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We're planning a 9 to 10 hour dive. We can't go that long without eating.

What kind of 'food' could replace at least 2 meals of the day so we can 'survive' a long dive like that?

We'll figure out if something can be eaten while scuba diving. But maybe someone has already done something like that or has another 'extreme' sport where normal food isn't applicable anymore.

I'm thinking astronaut food but where do you get that?

I'm looking for something that looks like tube of toothpaste or similar.

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I might check an outdoors or sporting goods store to see what they have for food. Any astronaut food I've seen in stores or online seem to be more of a novelty thing (granted I didn't search too deeply) so I don't know how available actual astronaut food is to the public. You could try dehydrating your own food as an option. –  Matt Chan Apr 19 '12 at 15:07
    
Yeah and the online astronaut food a saw are not really suitable for underwater. ( It needs to be fluid so we don't have to chew on it, and we can push it out of a 'container' in our mouths without touching the water ) –  scubaFLY Apr 20 '12 at 7:16
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Something like Energy gels or Performance gels perhaps? –  Markus Wall Apr 20 '12 at 8:32
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Am I missing something or is this question a joke? According to PADI scuba charts, a dive to 35 feet has a maximum allowable bottom time of 205 minutes, which is a bit over 3 hours. In reality you would not want to get so close to the limit and you would probably not go to just 35 feet. Unless there is something I don't know about, a 10 hour dive would kill you from nitrogren narcosis/poisoning. worlddivingreview.com/scuba-diving-and-nitrogen-narcosis –  yarian Nov 12 '12 at 4:04
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I know about eating gels, eating bananas, even mars bars, but since not many divers do this I was wondering if there was a better solution. Note that even today PADI instructors teach students to ascent at a max speed of 18meters/min while this originates from military standards where this was the speed where military divers could ascent with all their gear and not based on decompression limits. decompression limits ( non deco dives ) are actually and have been 10m/min for more than 10 years. So I really don't trust PADI standards especially in 'non PADI' ( recreational ) dives –  FLY Nov 12 '12 at 16:07
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migrated from fitness.stackexchange.com Apr 26 '12 at 12:45

This question came from our site for physical fitness professionals, athletes, trainers, and those providing health-related needs.

1 Answer

up vote 9 down vote accepted

When I climbed Mount Everest in 2010 I went from 9 pm, when we started for the summit, until 5 pm the next day, without eating. I had only 1 liter of gatorade to drink in that time too. Obviously I didn't die, and it required a lot of energy, let me assure you. So you can 'survive' your dive, and I guess challenge your thought about 'we can't go that long without eating'. If you can drink during your dive then you can take in calories through sports drinks or gels. I imagine training for a long dive like that by progressively doing longer and longer dives without food but only with sports drinks might make it easier too. Hope that helps!

Update: just to add, I did not eat much before the ascent, as at altitude it gets hard to eat. Your body will not like it but it will survive. Getting past the mental barrier might be a bigger challenge.

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I know I will 'survive' but for safety we want to keep a focused mind. But as you climbed the Mount Everest, you probably needed a focused mind as well. Training dives are gonna be made and we will test this. Thanks for your answer. edit: drinking during dives is possible so we will stick to sport drinks and gels. –  scubaFLY Apr 23 '12 at 7:37
    
I suggest making your own gels, if you weren't already thinking that. It's nice to be able to tailor the taste, consistency, and nutrition to your needs. –  Greg.Ley Apr 26 '12 at 19:08
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