Take the 2-minute tour ×
The Great Outdoors Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people who love outdoor activities, excursions, and outdoorsmanship. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the last few months I have come to the conclusion that I need to have a fingerboard at home if my climbing is to get to the next level.
generic fingerboard image
But the problem is that I live in an apartment. How can I mount a fingerboard in an apartment?

What options are there in an apartment to mount a fingerboard without definitely losing my security deposit? The goal will be to spend a lot of time hanging off of this thing, so it will need to be very reliable bearing my weight.

I have been assuming I NEED to mount this to the wall permanently. Is there another option? Is there an inexpensive way to build a free-standing structure for it?

share|improve this question
5  
If you do mount it directly, make sure you are attaching to studs and joists, not just the drywall. Otherwise, you're looking at a large repair bill. See DIY.SE for tips on patching holes before moving out. –  BMitch Dec 31 '12 at 19:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You have a few options:

  • Don't worry about the lease and accept the fact that you may lose your security deposit. You can take the board down before you move out, spackle over the holes, and hope the landlord doesn't notice. I live in the US, and that seems to be the preferred option here. Everyone I know who has a hangboard has done this, and they seem to get away with it.
  • Build a system board, and mount the hangboard to the top. You can build a freestanding structure like this, and mount a hangboard to the top. I don't have a design handy, but a friend of mine build a variation of this design where there was space to mount the hangboard on top. This would take up a large amount of floorspace, and be the most expensive option.
  • Use another product:
    • Metolius Rock Rings: You could suspend a pair of Metolius Rock Rings from a doorjam mounted pull-up bar, like in this this picture.
    • Blank Slate board: here its another hangboard from a different company, but it comes attached to its own removable doorjamb mounted frame. I've never actually used one, just seen them advertised.
share|improve this answer
1  
The system board would be my preferred option - as you will undoubtedly cause damage to the wall over time with your feet, knees etc (I know I did) so a board that can take the scuffs and damage is a cheaper solution than repairs to drywall! –  Rory Alsop Dec 31 '12 at 20:00
    
I already have a doorjam-mounted pull-up bar. So my first move will be to buy the rock rings and mount them as you've shown. After that I will work on the other options. Thanks for the response! –  theJollySin Jan 2 '13 at 18:39
    
The "system board" idea is great, but it's not freestanding. It needs to be attached to the surrounding structure (the studs and joists inside the walls of the room.) But if you are going to put holes in the walls anyway, this is a better option if you have the space, the cash, and access to tools to build it. –  manoftheson Jan 15 '13 at 19:49
    
I bought the Metolious Rock Rings, by the way. They're mounted on my doorjab pull-up bar. I have been doing a 20-minute finger work-out twice a week that is exceedingly painful. Thanks so much for your help. –  theJollySin Jan 24 '13 at 15:50
1  
Painful in a good way? :) –  DavidR Jan 24 '13 at 17:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.