Take the 2-minute tour ×
The Great Outdoors Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people who love outdoor activities, excursions, and outdoorsmanship. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd really like to hear thoughts about this from more advanced guys.

Since nearly one year I am living relatively close to the Alps so that weekend trips in the beautiful mountains of Germany and Austria are quite easy to achieve. So I am really enjoying to go for long hikes in wonderful nature with mostly great views.

Quickly I knew that I want more: Higher summits, bigger challenges with using diverse skills.

  • But how to achieve this?

I know it's probably too risky to make alpine tours alone, especially when you go over glaciers. I joined DAV to be insured while in the mountains and to be able to use the offerings like courses and guided tours. But they are quite expensive, I can't and don't want to do this every month.

I also read books about the topic but I guess book knowledge isn't enough, especially for higher risk mountain tours.

In my opinion the best would be to have a couple of more advanced friends who are able to teach or even know guides or groups and go with them for fun and to learn. Unfortunately I am not having this opportunity (yet?).

  • What do you think is most important to learn and how should one learn?

My experience is quite low, e.g. I have no clue about knots and security. I think that I am quite well equipped already, although this might not be the most important to start with. From my point of view I am also quite athletic and fit, so I can trek a day with medium weight backpack in a quite fast speed. At least in lower altitudes (I was never above 3000m, but my goal is to summit above 5000m in the next years).

Sorry that I wrote this wall of text, but you are welcome to do it too :)

Edit

To summarize the question I could also ask:

  • When you were a beginner, who were the persons you learnt from and how did you met them?
  • What did they teach you and in which order?
share|improve this question
2  
Mountaineering isn't one activity or one skill. It's a whole bunch of different skills, only some of which will be relevant for any given climb. A rock climbing gym is a good place to start learning some basic rope skills. Self-arrest is a crucial skill that is best learned from an experienced instructor with a good student-teacher ratio; however, you can also practice it alone and review the skills using youtube videos. Gradually try different things and increasing levels of difficulty. –  Ben Crowell Jan 22 at 18:17
    
@BenCrowell Yes every route is different and needs a diverse set of skills. Knowing what to do while on rock and ice are what I have to learn. I made a course last year for basic mountaineering where we tried self-arrest or learnt how to navigate. It was really cool and I'd wish to do this every weekend... So I would love to "try different things". The how's and where's are the main question I am asking here. I could call it: "When you were a beginner, who were the persons you learnt from and how did you met them? What did they teach you and in which order?". –  EverythingRightPlace Jan 23 at 17:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In my opinion the best would be to have a couple of more advanced friends who are able to teach or even know guides or groups and go with them for fun and to learn. Unfortunately I am not having this opportunity (yet?).

How that, when you are already a member of the DAV? It is first and foremost an club of mountain enthusiasts, not a provider of insurance and paid courses. The Ortsgruppen and Interessengruppen are basically just people enjoying their hobby together, and open to all DAV members. They have regular (weekly to monthly) meetups and are usually happy to welcome newcomers. However, they will expect you to have at least basic knowledge about things like "knots and security" before they take you on a trip - so it might be a good idea to pay for a course first, maybe after going to a meetup and asking for advice which one would be most appropriate.

There is also an online DAV community where your question might yield more specific answers than here.

To make this answer more general: Try to find clubs or informal meetings of fellow mountaineers where you can meet people to learn from. Apart fomr the internet, stores that carry mountaineering equipment are a good place to start; the employees are often involved in the local scene or at least know about it.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Michael. Thx for your answer. By pure chance I discovered just yesterday that there is something like the "Interessengruppen". There is a group for alpine tours, I will go there for sure! –  EverythingRightPlace Jan 27 at 16:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.