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I'm currently planning my autumn (August/September) trek somewhere in Canadian mountains. Canada is vast and there are many very spectacular places, but some are very popular; for example, Jasper National Park gets some 2 million visitors per year, and even backcountry camping is limited to campsites and need reservations. This means there is neither solitude nor flexibility, so I will look for a less popular location. I've been considering Kluane national park, Mealy mountains national park, Tatsenshini-Alsek provincial park, Northern Rocky Mountains provincial park, Tombstone territorial park, and others. I suspect the number of visitors for those parks ranges from less than a hundred to hundreds of thousands per year, but I'm only guessing. When off-trail hiking is possible and permitted, the probability of solitude naturally increases dramatically.

For U.S. national parks, visitor statistics are available online. For Canadian national parks too. Total visits for BC provincial parks top 20 million. But is there anywhere where per-park visitors for provincial and territorial parks in Canada are estimated?

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I take issue with your claim that camping only on designated sites means no solitude. In canoe camping parks, backcountry camping is limited to designated sites, but each site is for one party and well separated from others. I have gone for days without seeing other people except at portages. You might want to look into the specifics for the parks you're interested in - a designated site doesn't mean a crowded campground, at least it doesn't have to. –  Kate Gregory Apr 13 at 12:48

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Provincial park statistics:

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