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I started geocaching roughly a month ago and it's really fun activity to get into.

I had a few questions (though one was answered already here > What should be carried in a standard Geocaching bag?) but my main question is typically for the UK due to people nature here, though all ideas are welcome.

So far we've a small geocaching kit consisting of pens, extra paper and lunch bag style plastic bags to help protect damp logbooks (of which thus far we have found many). Sometimes we pick up a few small items that we add in - so far we haven't taken any items out of a cache - these were mostly small toys, coins, etc. This is commonly what we find in caches as well.

Most caches we find currently are small (excluding micro) with the odd regular. And per item we would look to pay £3 or less, as we can find 6-7 caches per day out, but price does not necessarily constitute value to an outdoorsman. I would reserve pricier items for harder caches (4-5) but we are currently only finding 1-3 rated caches.

I am loathe to leave things like matches or fire starters or other useful outdoor tools such as that due to idiots who might abuse them. Though once or twice I've seen a compass in the caches and think these are a good idea. Caches should be, I believe, useful outdoors items, but to avoid caches being filled with toys and money, and wanting to overall improve the quality of my local caches:

What are considered good items to leave in a geocache? What items should be avoided?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

All under £3:


What about a Spork

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everyone should have a spork....


Vango eye light £3 bargain

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Vango mug

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  • button compass
  • pencil sharpener
  • magnifying glass

(updates when I think of some more)

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I really like these as all cater for the small caches :) and I could probably pick up a bunch of these from poundland :) –  Aravona Aug 12 at 7:06

A cheap ($17) camera! Would document geocachers, perhaps with instructions to take your pic! Keychain Camera

Small laser pointer. Batteries last a long time, light shines long distance, and it's lightweight - great to help emergency crews find you.

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Good idea for a 4-5 star rating cache, I wouldn't want to leave this in my everyday 1-3 stars though, any further suggestions? –  Aravona Aug 12 at 6:58
    
How about a small laser pointer. Batteries last a long time, light shines long distance, and it's lightweight - great to help emergency crews find you: officedepot.com/a/products/783351/… –  Lizz Aug 12 at 7:10
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Nice idea but again something of that cost I would only put in a more difficult cache ideally looking for items more like Liam and Stevemarvell have said, small and cheap and useful for the British outdoors. –  Aravona Aug 12 at 7:15
    
My bad - sorry. Laser pointer for $2.27 (no tax or shipping): dx.com/p/… –  Lizz Aug 12 at 7:29
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Updated your question to fix links and add the laser in - feel free to revert but a fuller answer is better than lots of comments :) ideally though I'm looking to source locally from the UK :) –  Aravona Aug 12 at 7:39

Being in the military, I particularly like the idea of Challenge Coins (if you have the funding to put into it) as a geocaching reward. Places like this (http://www.challengecoins4less.com/) let you make your own, or you could consider buying a pre-made coin. They're small and pretty fun to have. I would definitely save them for a tougher find though, as they can cost 2-3 USD a piece.

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Nice idea, trackables though I would again only leave in a 4-5 star cache, not the everyday 1-3 stars that are more common here. Plus they are a lot more expensive in the UK (UK based question) –  Aravona Aug 12 at 7:03

If you want to drop some really useful outdoor items, consider that all plastic straps, strap side release latches and strap adjusters, as well as safety-pins, needles and threads, and other repair items.

Some caches may bless you for it if his/hers rucksack is damaged while hiking, and they have not repair kit.

Such things are cheap to buy in bulk, but if you need them they are very precious :)

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This answer actually gave us the idea to get some bootlaces and add them to a cache, thanks! –  Aravona Sep 17 at 12:48

Books

Check charity shops, you can often get books for £1, or sometimes 4 for £1. Or any books you have read, and don't want to keep. You can pick relevant books, ie anything about the outdoors, or children's books for a family friendly cache, or something specific to the local area or theme of the cache.

You do have to be selective as to what books will actually fit in a cache. But there some reasonably large caches that will fit a standard paperback. It is worth putting the book in a ziplock bag, in case the cache gets wet inside.

You can register the books on BookCrossing, which allows people to log them, and you can track them if they are released again. I have left a number of BookCrossing books in caches - most are never logged again. But a few are moved on to other caches, or left in the wild elsewhere, sometimes travelling great distances, and being read by many different people.

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