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15

According to regulations in Tanzania, you can't climb Kilimanjaro without a guide. That means you will 100% be with somebody that understands the nature of acclimatization and has likely been up many many times previously. When you hire a guide, or book a guided trip via a company, they will also take care of permits for you. Most companies automatically ...


11

Disclaimer - this is purely based on a bit of prior knowledge and augmented with some more research, I've never been to subsaharan Africa and don't really plan to ever wild camp there! Wild camping around that area verges along the more extreme side of wild camping - some may say it's madness, and there's obviously much, much more risk than wild camping in ...


10

I think it may be difficult to directly compare laminate or coated hardshells with softshells, because the technology involved can be complicated. So here's the simple answer: If you get a strech-woven softshell, it will almost certainly be more breathable than any hardshell, at the expense of complete waterproofness. At the same time, most softshells are ...


9

I wrote up some notes here that me be helpful. Climbing Kilimanjaro is not a big deal. It doesn't require a lot of stamina or strength, because the need for gradual acclimatization severely limits how far you can go every day. It's not legal to climb without a guide, and when you pay for a guide, you're also typically also getting a lot of support, which is ...


7

I have camped in the Okavango delta, Kalahari desert and on Kilimanjaro. I would not try sleeping outside, tent is a minimum. On one of the trips we had a 4x4 with a roof tent. That was very practical, easy to put up, and you felt a bit safer being off the ground. Some of the game reserves have camping sites. There is not much difference with respect to ...


7

Aligning the answer strictly for Kilimanjaro, I'd first recommend you to select the route that you are going to take. If you want to take the easiest way up, the Marangu route shall be perfectly suitable for you (No offence, just in case if you remain unprepared, if you have been preparing well, you might try the other routes. I'd consider taking two ...


6

Killamanjaro has relatively simple terrain. The main issue with climbing it is it's height (it's nearly 6000m/20,000feet). You will need to acclimatise correctly. It will take several days to do this so you will need to spend some time on the mountain (this won't be a day hike!) Most people who climb this mountain do so as part of an organised group. If ...


2

I'm researching wild camping in western Africa at the moment and the main thing I've learned thus far is not to listen to people who haven't been there. Threat from animals aside, apparently the thing to do is to ask at villages if it's okay to spend the night on their land. You'll likely be given food, too.



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