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9

That depends entirely on weather conditions and the paths you plan to take. If you stay on cleared roads, your Icetrekkers should be sufficient (and may not even be necessary). The main problem will be snow, not ice. Hiking paths will generally not be cleared of snow, so you'd need snowshoes or touring skis. Additionally, if there is (or has been) heavy ...


7

Yes it is, but only for one night in any single spot. Staying multiple nights is considered camping and is not allowed. It is never allowed in national parks. I could only find Dutch references for this, but they all say the same and refer to relevant text in the Austrian lawbooks.


5

You cannot book most huts in advance. You simply arrive and get a place to sleep. If you're late then you will have to sleep on the floor. Places are awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. I speak from (limited) experience. I haven't slept in huts much, but I've visited quite often, and most are quite basic. There are some modern huts that can be ...


4

It is allowed if there's no sign declaring it as Naturschutzgebiet/Naturschutzzone this is german for natural reserve if there's no such sign or you know for sure your not in such a reserve, it's safe to swim legally. However, best practice is to ask at the local tourist information center.


3

When exactly do you plan to go? If you head over there in mid-late June, you should be completely fine without reservations. High-season for European trekkers doesn't start until much later in the summer (around mid-July), and the trails and huts will be significantly less crowded earlier in the summer. Otherwise, I would strongly suggest booking your huts ...


3

One such resource would the website of the Alpenverein. On their website, you can find an intercative hut-finding service. If you click on any of the huts, you will get detailed information about opening dates, services available, possibly a link to a website, etc. Most of this information is in German. If you can't read German, you might try Google ...


3

This is a copy paste from wikipedia: The right to roam in Austria, particularly in forests and mountainous areas, is called Wegefreiheit. Since 1975 the right to roam in forests is guaranteed by Federal law. In particular, walking, running, hiking, and resting are automatically allowed to the public in most forest areas. However, horse riding, ...


3

Having just returned from our trip, I will try to provide a description of how we planned it and how things worked out. When we arrived in Vienna we purchased a topographic map of the Gesause region at a book store. With this in hand, we decided to take a train from Vienna to Gaishorn am See, to the south of the park. The train takes three hours and isn't ...


2

I can recommend the Verwall-Trek. It is a trek from St. Christoph (Arlberg, near St. Anton) via the Kaltenberghütte, Konstanzer Hütte, Neue Heilbronner Hütte, Friedrichshafener Hütte, Darmstädter Hütte, Niederelbehütte und Edmund-Graf-Hütte to Pettneu. Of course you can adjust the route as you wish. I recommend to fly to Friedrichshafen or Innsbruck and then ...


2

The Hochschwab is a mountain range in Styria. You can find trail information with photos about this region in German or English using Google Translate. You may want to spend a few nights at the same hut to simplify the logistics. You could plan several day hikes from the same hut. There is a beautiful lake that people scuba dive in which is car accessible. ...



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