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9

In general they are not considered dangerous because they rarely attack humans. You should not run away from coyotes as they will consider you a prey if you do. Under extreme circumstances they may circle an individual or a group. Making noise generally keeps them at bay or at a distance. In 2009, there was, unfortunately, a fatality in Cape-Breton ...


8

Wind-chimes where originally designed to keep wildlife away, for example Wolves don't like sounds they don't know, that's why it will keep them away. So it's safer (to play an instrument) than not playing an instrument on your campsite


8

This is a great example of technically true statistics being misleading. I'll take their word for it that more people get injured by moose than any other animal except hippos. However, I strongly suspect that most moose injuries are due to automobile collisions with moose. Moose have evolved to be big enough so that predators aren't a threat to a healthy ...


8

When a car hts a moose, because their legs are so long, generally the moose's body slides across the hood and collides with the windshield and people. Combined with the larger weight of a moose compared to a deer or other wildlife, people are much less likely to survive an accident when their car hits a moose. That said, it is possible to have an ...


8

I assume that the way the said animal is marking it's territory, and with reference to "They don't come at night when I sleep inside.", can I assume that you are camping there more than a night or two? If thats the case then I am hoping that its not a backcountry area where you have bears. Marking the territory in the sense you are talking of definitely ...


6

I'm lucky to come from the UK where this isn't really an issue (though we still have adders, so sometimes I'm a bit wary.) Having said that, I'll generally still take the following precautions to avoid being bitten, even if it's not life threatening (red ant bytes can still be bloody annoying for instance, and there's lots of those!) Use a torch. I always ...


6

Cornell Labs has several good resources: http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1478&ac=ac The Sibley app also has bird sounds you can compare to (as do several other mobile apps): http://www.mydigitalearth.com/dproducts/sibleyinfo.html There is supposed to be an app coming out which can identify automatically, but I have not yet found a copy of ...


6

Here's the Wolf Safety guidelines and procedures for British Columbia Parks, and here's backcountry advice around wolves from the Predator Conservation Alliance, they basically say that wolves don't normally pose a threat, keep 100m distance, use bear spray if necessary. I live in a national park that has two wolf packs, coyotes, cougars, black and grizzly ...


6

Wikipedia has very nice article about Wolf attacks on humans Wolves will avoid people like any other wild predator that is smaller than the average human. If you come between them and their young, you should just slowly back out of that situation and heed the wolf's warnings. Unless the wolves are threatened by you, the chances of an attack are very ...


6

A few points to add here: Coyotes are not know to be aggressive towards humans. But always remember that coyote is a wild animal. It is not domesticated and hence it's very difficult say with certainty about the behavior. Coyotes are know to attack dogs, sheep and other livestock. So yes, they can bite. If not you, your dog maybe? Any animal, when it ...


4

Friends of mine were going for a trip to Canada. They told me that walking the woods they were singing/whistling/clapping most of the time. The main issue is alarming bears abruptly which can cause them to attack. I guess this is true for other wild animals too. I made a quick google search to verify this. You can find tips very easily, like e.g. here where ...


4

I agree with berry120 that contacting local experts, or even hobbyists will most likely be the easiest way to go. They should have a much better knowledge of local species than you would be able to find in (online) literature. Comming across plants or animals in the outdoors its always interesting to identify them, but not always easy. In my experience its ...


3

Adding to what Don Branson said, Try not to dismantle or peep into a pile of stones, small cracks. With reference to :"During winter, do most of these reptiles go in some sort of hibernation, or can some/many still be found and seen during the day where there is some sun?" What I've observed is, It is most likely that you may come across a snake/serpent ...


3

Campers in polar region are encouraged to adopt the following habit (taken from here): Along the northern coast, near North Pangnirtung Fiord, the potential for polar bear encounters is higher because of proximity to the ocean. Hikers are encouraged to camp several kilometres inland rather than on the coast. Does this company take risks? It ...


3

I have been recommended to carry a tin can, filled partly with gravel. This will rattle and oust snakes, boars, bears. I have no idea how effective this would be. Playing a musical instrument should have similar effect, as suggested by all the comments.


3

I am going to take a shot at this one and say it will not be enough to ensure your safety. Bears are very curious animals and they are not afraid to get in contact with humans. Polar Bears have mastered their predilection area because they are on the top of the food chain. For more information, please refer here Taken from the above link: "Avoid camping ...


3

According to @mojzis' link, there is a chance of wolves: So perhaps the most useful recommendation would be to speak to locals in each area you travel to, to understand what areas are considered safe, and whether they have local guidelines on food storage, proximity to open areas, gun permits etc. And of course that guidance would hold for any such ...


2

Coyotes now live in our area in significant numbers. There was a den on our property this winter, and a few months ago there were four pups romping around in our back yard. We hear them howling pretty much every night. I've been in the woods and in open fields with coyotes around and never felt threatened or considered it a problem at all. In fact, I ...


2

I think this question is sufficiently similar to the other one that the answer will be identical. It isn't safe. Of course this company is taking risks, as all exploration companies do. There are many risks with camping or trekking in polar bear country. What you do is minimise the risks where possible, and accept the risks you can't minimise. As @Amine ...


2

If you're after a certain, one-off dead set answer then you might want to try looking up departments / experts in this area in academia and then send them a polite email saying you'd be very grateful of their help. I'm sure many would be willing to answer since as experts in their field it'd probably take 2 seconds to work out (and many people I know in ...


2

Unfortunately your picture doesn't give a good sense of scale, but my first reaction was that it looked like dog poop. Some other canid is also possible, with coyote being the most probable, then fox. As for safety concert, you don't need to examine poop for that. There is nothing in southern NH that is a physical threat to humans, at least assuming a ...


2

Obviously safety is usually a relative concept, what seems safe for you might not be for others, so answers here may vary. I don't have experience with geocaching, but I do have a lot of experience with reptiles. I'm a hobbyist wildlife photographer specializing in reptiles, amphibians and insects. When reaching into an unknown area, the safest thing that I ...


2

To add to what others have mentioned, reptiles do indeed go into hibernation, but not in the thought of "traditional" hibernation, such as that of a bear or other mammals. Reptiles usually do burrow down, but they can certainly be awoken. Here in the southeast, if the temperatures rise just a bit, we have plenty of snakes and lizards around sunning ...


2

The great thing about finding bones outside is that for the most part, they're already clean! I'm from a small hunting town, going out for hikes to look for bones and sheds is a popular thing to do in the spring. I found bear skull on a game trail once, you don't need to do much more than collect them in a garbage bag or a cardboard box, old bones aren't ...


1

As for different animals, or yourself, marking their territory, I think the only time that makes a difference is when the two animals are in competition with each other. A bear or mountain lion will have a large territory marked that they hunt within. However, a raccoon may occupy a smaller territory within a bears territory. The bear will ignore any raccoon ...


1

Try marking the tent as your territory. Same way they do.



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