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72

Wild dogs can indeed be dangerous, and packs can be extremely dangerous. You do not want to take on a pack of dogs if you can at all avoid it, and running is often a particularly bad idea. I suggest starting with the basics: try to keep the dog calm and don't try to intimidate it. This means: Don't make direct eye contact, and remember that sunglasses ...


29

TLDR: Foxes do not attack humans. So you can go there day and night. To me this sounds more like a spooking story than reality. Foxes hunt very small animals, humans are way too big for them. Anyway, in their natural habitat they are extremely shy and will run away from you most likely before you are even aware of its presence. Foxes with rabies can lose ...


25

I'd say the only circumstances where you could try to run is when a safe place is near (your car, some kind of shelter, a tree you can climb etc.), the dogs are already alert and running to you (otherwise you could just walk to the shelter without them noticing), and you can realistically make it to the shelter before the dogs do. Remember that dogs car run ...


25

To the question of whether you should run from a pack of dogs that may be aggressive, the answer is an unqualified NO!. As to what you should do, the answer is a bit more complicated. In the vast majority of cases, dogs won't attack you without provocation. As always, assume the best but prepare for the worst. The basics: Be Prepared: Prevention is ...


23

So far all of the answers are assuming the wild dogs are actively hunting you or at least seriously considering attacking you. This might be due to the part of your question where you say: ... or should I stand fast and defend myself? If the dogs appear to be actively hunting you then a controlled exit to a safe area as suggested by Dmitry Grigoryev is ...


21

In general they are not considered dangerous because they rarely attack humans. You should not run away from coyotes as they will consider you a prey if you do. Under extreme circumstances they may circle an individual or a group. Making noise generally keeps them at bay or at a distance. In 2009, there was, unfortunately, a fatality in Cape-Breton ...


11

A few points to add here: Coyotes are not know to be aggressive towards humans. But always remember that coyote is a wild animal. It is not domesticated and hence it's very difficult say with certainty about the behavior. Coyotes are know to attack dogs, sheep and other livestock. So yes, they can bite. If not you, your dog maybe? Any animal, when it ...


10

Cornell Labs has several good resources: http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1478&ac=ac The Sibley app also has bird sounds you can compare to (as do several other mobile apps): http://www.mydigitalearth.com/dproducts/sibleyinfo.html There is supposed to be an app coming out which can identify automatically, but I have not yet found a copy of ...


10

Wind-chimes where originally designed to keep wildlife away, for example Wolves don't like sounds they don't know, that's why it will keep them away. So it's safer (to play an instrument) than not playing an instrument on your campsite


10

In Mexico, I learned that the best way to deal with wild dogs was to squat down very briefly and pick up a small stone. I never had to actually chuck it at a dog. They skulked off quite quickly when they saw the movement that looked like the human was picking up a small rock.


10

Urban red foxes have been known to be a tad vicious or territorial and attack people... but it is not a common occurrence by any means, usually it's due to the fox having gotten itself into a cornered situation, they then act as any wild animal will and potentially strike. There is always the odd news story of a fox getting into a house, and attacking ...


10

Yes! Not a silly question at all and surprisingly easy to answer: yes! There are even sound-systems exactly for that use. Try sound. Sound can have an excellent impact on a coyote that has wandered into your yard or campsite. Try banging trash can lids or anything else that is noisy to scare the coyote off. Yell and make a lot of noise ...


9

Coyotes now live in our area in significant numbers. There was a den on our property this winter, and a few months ago there were four pups romping around in our back yard. We hear them howling pretty much every night. I've been in the woods and in open fields with coyotes around and never felt threatened or considered it a problem at all. In fact, I ...


9

This is a great example of technically true statistics being misleading. I'll take their word for it that more people get injured by moose than any other animal except hippos. However, I strongly suspect that most moose injuries are due to automobile collisions with moose. Moose have evolved to be big enough so that predators aren't a threat to a healthy ...


8

When a car hts a moose, because their legs are so long, generally the moose's body slides across the hood and collides with the windshield and people. Combined with the larger weight of a moose compared to a deer or other wildlife, people are much less likely to survive an accident when their car hits a moose. That said, it is possible to have an ...


8

I agree with berry120 that contacting local experts, or even hobbyists will most likely be the easiest way to go. They should have a much better knowledge of local species than you would be able to find in (online) literature. Comming across plants or animals in the outdoors its always interesting to identify them, but not always easy. In my experience its ...


8

I assume that the way the said animal is marking it's territory, and with reference to "They don't come at night when I sleep inside.", can I assume that you are camping there more than a night or two? If thats the case then I am hoping that its not a backcountry area where you have bears. Marking the territory in the sense you are talking of definitely ...


8

It sounds like they were telling tales, possibly for your own good. Exploring by night can be extremely dangerous, for reasons that have nothing to do with foxes. Tripping, falling, or just plain walking into a tree are very real dangers. Foxes, however, are not[1]. They do hunt in small family groups (a skulk, not a pack), but target prey like mice. ...


7

Here's the Wolf Safety guidelines and procedures for British Columbia Parks, and here's backcountry advice around wolves from the Predator Conservation Alliance, they basically say that wolves don't normally pose a threat, keep 100m distance, use bear spray if necessary. I live in a national park that has two wolf packs, coyotes, cougars, black and grizzly ...


6

I'm lucky to come from the UK where this isn't really an issue (though we still have adders, so sometimes I'm a bit wary.) Having said that, I'll generally still take the following precautions to avoid being bitten, even if it's not life threatening (red ant bytes can still be bloody annoying for instance, and there's lots of those!) Use a torch. I always ...


6

Wikipedia has very nice article about Wolf attacks on humans Wolves will avoid people like any other wild predator that is smaller than the average human. If you come between them and their young, you should just slowly back out of that situation and heed the wolf's warnings. Unless the wolves are threatened by you, the chances of an attack are very ...


6

The only way you could do the lamb harm by picking it up (aside from dropping it, or otherwise injuring it by handling it wrong) is if for one reason or another it wasn't accepted back into its herd, or if your interaction gave it a reason to leave the herd. Some animals will reject their dependant young if they smell like human, as far as I'm aware this ...


6

If you ask the net, you'll find some Serbian Scorpions. But I hope you'll never find one of these in your tent. I was a few times in Serbia, Bosnia and Croatia and have never a Scorpion in my tent. Also I don't know any scorpions from there being harmful/poisonous. Just be care full when entering your tent and keep the tent closed. If you want, you can put ...


6

Because of the extremely high "Fear Factor" this subject engenders, I want to carefully examine the threat of contracting rabies from a different but still extremely vital angle: The engendered rabies threat from a fox bite is admittedly over-rated; as it now stands, it can be construed to be more of a "psychological," rather than "physical," danger. I am ...


5

If you're after a certain, one-off dead set answer then you might want to try looking up departments / experts in this area in academia and then send them a polite email saying you'd be very grateful of their help. I'm sure many would be willing to answer since as experts in their field it'd probably take 2 seconds to work out (and many people I know in ...


5

Friends of mine were going for a trip to Canada. They told me that walking the woods they were singing/whistling/clapping most of the time. The main issue is alarming bears abruptly which can cause them to attack. I guess this is true for other wild animals too. I made a quick google search to verify this. You can find tips very easily, like e.g. here where ...


5

As a youngster I roamed a lot of times in nature in the former Yugoslavia, and I have seen a scorpion only once when I turned a heavy stone. It looks to me that scorpions there appreciate places where it's pretty cold in the warm South European summer. I've never heard any local people complaining about scorpions.


5

Firstly wild dogs are not harmful if you are not doing any foolish in front of it. SERIOUS BITES ARE RELATIVELY RARE, AND NO PARTICULAR BREED is more likely to be responsible for serious bites 1 This maybe bit scary, but sometimes doing nothing and just standing still can save your life. Animals focus on you more when you running. Most ...


5

As to the OP's question: The answer is Most Probably Not. From http://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?a=2723&q=345000, a State of Connecticut publication on the Eastern Chipmunk: There is no difference in appearance between males and females. From How to tell if the Chipmunk is male or female •Pick your chipmunk up with your hands and place ...


4

According to @mojzis' link, there is a chance of wolves: So perhaps the most useful recommendation would be to speak to locals in each area you travel to, to understand what areas are considered safe, and whether they have local guidelines on food storage, proximity to open areas, gun permits etc. And of course that guidance would hold for any such ...



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