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75

Wild dogs can indeed be dangerous, and packs can be extremely dangerous. You do not want to take on a pack of dogs if you can at all avoid it, and running is often a particularly bad idea. I suggest starting with the basics: try to keep the dog calm and don't try to intimidate it. This means: Don't make direct eye contact, and remember that sunglasses ...


30

TLDR: Foxes do not attack humans. So you can go there day and night. To me this sounds more like a spooking story than reality. Foxes hunt very small animals, humans are way too big for them. Anyway, in their natural habitat they are extremely shy and will run away from you most likely before you are even aware of its presence. Foxes with rabies can lose ...


27

To the question of whether you should run from a pack of dogs that may be aggressive, the answer is an unqualified NO!. As to what you should do, the answer is a bit more complicated. In the vast majority of cases, dogs won't attack you without provocation. As always, assume the best but prepare for the worst. The basics: Be Prepared: Prevention is ...


26

I'd say the only circumstances where you could try to run is when a safe place is near (your car, some kind of shelter, a tree you can climb etc.), the dogs are already alert and running to you (otherwise you could just walk to the shelter without them noticing), and you can realistically make it to the shelter before the dogs do. Remember that dogs car run ...


24

So far all of the answers are assuming the wild dogs are actively hunting you or at least seriously considering attacking you. This might be due to the part of your question where you say: ... or should I stand fast and defend myself? If the dogs appear to be actively hunting you then a controlled exit to a safe area as suggested by Dmitry Grigoryev is ...


12

In Mexico, I learned that the best way to deal with wild dogs was to squat down very briefly and pick up a small stone. I never had to actually chuck it at a dog. They skulked off quite quickly when they saw the movement that looked like the human was picking up a small rock.


10

Yes! Not a silly question at all and surprisingly easy to answer: yes! There are even sound-systems exactly for that use. Try sound. Sound can have an excellent impact on a coyote that has wandered into your yard or campsite. Try banging trash can lids or anything else that is noisy to scare the coyote off. Yell and make a lot of noise ...


10

Urban red foxes have been known to be a tad vicious or territorial and attack people... but it is not a common occurrence by any means, usually it's due to the fox having gotten itself into a cornered situation, they then act as any wild animal will and potentially strike. There is always the odd news story of a fox getting into a house, and attacking ...


9

In the picture given: The brown spot beneath the arm is a gut shot. If sitting just like this you'd have to shoot through the arm for a chest shot (and waste most of that meat). In general: Rifle hunting (.22) just shoot for the head. The head is just as big as the chest target area and damages the meat less. Generally though squirrels are not very ...


9

The sound you are referring to is probably a plaintive call used to attract attention (of a mate or from the little ones to the parents for feeding) it might just be them wanting to be fed. You can find a better explanation with sound samples here: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Herring_Gull/sounds


8

It sounds like they were telling tales, possibly for your own good. Exploring by night can be extremely dangerous, for reasons that have nothing to do with foxes. Tripping, falling, or just plain walking into a tree are very real dangers. Foxes, however, are not[1]. They do hunt in small family groups (a skulk, not a pack), but target prey like mice. ...


6

Having actually hunted and killed squirrels for food before, if you're planning on keeping the meat, then you don't want to shoot it in the body, shoot it in the head. A squirrels head is just as big as it's kill zone, if you shoot for the body you'll likely damage the precious meager morsels. One squirrel isn't enough food for one person to begin with, so ...


6

As to the OP's question: The answer is Most Probably Not. From http://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?a=2723&q=345000, a State of Connecticut publication on the Eastern Chipmunk: There is no difference in appearance between males and females. From How to tell if the Chipmunk is male or female •Pick your chipmunk up with your hands and place ...


6

Because of the extremely high "Fear Factor" this subject engenders, I want to carefully examine the threat of contracting rabies from a different but still extremely vital angle: The engendered rabies threat from a fox bite is admittedly over-rated; as it now stands, it can be construed to be more of a "psychological," rather than "physical," danger. I am ...


6

If you ask the net, you'll find some Serbian Scorpions. But I hope you'll never find one of these in your tent. I was a few times in Serbia, Bosnia and Croatia and have never a Scorpion in my tent. Also I don't know any scorpions from there being harmful/poisonous. Just be care full when entering your tent and keep the tent closed. If you want, you can put ...


6

*Are wolves a legitimate worry-worthy threat to back-country travelers?* The short answer is no. I can honestly say I have a lot of experience around wolves. I live in Alaska and have encountered wolves here many times, as well as in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Canada. Wolf attacks are extremely rare. What are my odds of ...


6

Firstly wild dogs are not harmful if you are not doing any foolish in front of it. SERIOUS BITES ARE RELATIVELY RARE, AND NO PARTICULAR BREED is more likely to be responsible for serious bites 1 This maybe bit scary, but sometimes doing nothing and just standing still can save your life. Animals focus on you more when you running. Most ...


5

As a youngster I roamed a lot of times in nature in the former Yugoslavia, and I have seen a scorpion only once when I turned a heavy stone. It looks to me that scorpions there appreciate places where it's pretty cold in the warm South European summer. I've never heard any local people complaining about scorpions.


5

I have couple tips for such situation: Try to stand sideways to the dog if it is possible - I've heard about that in some National Geographic program - it's pretty neutral stand for dogs. In the same time try retreat very slowly Try to climb somewhere dog can't reach You (if it is possible) Don't be afraid; in most cases You're bigger and stronger and the ...


5

The robin should be quite capable of building the nest on her own. Almost anywhere there should be enough dried grass and small twigs around. It is unlikely your robin is having trouble finding building material. The best thing you can do for the robin family is to give them space. For your own enjoyment and perhaps that of others, you might install a ...


4

Here are some statistics on coyote attacks versus dog attacks in the US, on a per-year basis. (See notes at the end on how I got the numbers.) dog bites: 4.6 million fatal attacks by dogs on humans: 25 coyote bites: 8 fatal attacks by coyotes on humans: 0.06 These figures show that your chances of getting bitten by a dog are about 500,000 times greater ...


4

Just today I had a very interesting time watching a coyote (while it watched me) at the golf course across the street from my house in Oregon. S/he wasn't at all aggressive, but wary enough of me to not be seen as a threat to me (for example, the coyotes down in California, where I live outside of summer, are completely unafraid of humans, to the point of it ...


4

There are 2 types of dog aggression you are concerned about here: Territorial agression: Most common situation, you are coming through a place they consider their turf. You ignored the "obvious" piss smell and are trespassing. They are not attacking you so much as defending and they are somewhat afraid but there is strength in numbers. Do not run, that ...


3

I am not a Rabies expert - but I have very slightly more 1st hand experience than most people. Some years ago I was bitten by a guard dog in China (we were playing). My hosts were aghast, for reasons that made no sense to me. They took me to hospital. It was only when I saw the Rabies medication that I understood. The dog was never likely to have Rabies ...


3

You can't run from them, but... They can't climb to a tree. You can. They can't jump over a fence. You can. They can't even break a single glass window. Many of them fears if they see anything in your hands. They don't have any idea if this object is really dangerous or painful, or not. But... A dog see a human as a leader and a source of very happy ...


3

I live in NE Ohio. We have coyotes in a number of the local parks here including the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. The only warning the park service gives is that you keep dogs on a leash. They also request that you report any aggressive behavior. The rangers and naturalists I talk to have never had an issue with one except where someone has run their dog ...


3

We have one spot under our back deck where Robin's make a nest every year, last year we had a nest with five eggs: Every year, we did absolutely nothing to help them out, and they always did just fine. I did think that I could have helped a bit by giving them a couple worms when I poked my head in to take a look. Every time they'd hear something near by ...


2

For UK birds the RSPB maintains a directory of birds The information on each bird includes a recording of it's call:


2

I've lived in coyote country for most of my life and I've never even seen one. I've heard them, but never seen them. When I was a kid, I used to wander around the ranch I lived on in Santa Cruz with two golden retrievers. One of them was a male. He was a massive, powerful beast of about 90 lbs. Golden retrievers have a reputation for being friendly, and ...


2

I've spent many years hiking and camping in the Rocky Mountains and California, and animals I have seen more than once or regularly include black bears, deer, elk, moose, wild turkey, beaver, mountain goats and longhorn sheep. I've never seen mountain lions, although they are plentiful, but they keep themselves hidden. My aunt's husband says he wanted to ...



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