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9

In general they are not considered dangerous because they rarely attack humans. You should not run away from coyotes as they will consider you a prey if you do. Under extreme circumstances they may circle an individual or a group. Making noise generally keeps them at bay or at a distance. In 2009, there was, unfortunately, a fatality in Cape-Breton ...


6

I'm lucky to come from the UK where this isn't really an issue (though we still have adders, so sometimes I'm a bit wary.) Having said that, I'll generally still take the following precautions to avoid being bitten, even if it's not life threatening (red ant bytes can still be bloody annoying for instance, and there's lots of those!) Use a torch. I always ...


6

A few points to add here: Coyotes are not know to be aggressive towards humans. But always remember that coyote is a wild animal. It is not domesticated and hence it's very difficult say with certainty about the behavior. Coyotes are know to attack dogs, sheep and other livestock. So yes, they can bite. If not you, your dog maybe? Any animal, when it ...


6

Wind-chimes where originally designed to keep wildlife away, for example Wolves don't like sounds they don't know, that's why it will keep them away. So it's safer (to play an instrument) than not playing an instrument on your campsite


3

Friends of mine were going for a trip to Canada. They told me that walking the woods they were singing/whistling/clapping most of the time. The main issue is alarming bears abruptly which can cause them to attack. I guess this is true for other wild animals too. I made a quick google search to verify this. You can find tips very easily, like e.g. here where ...


2

Adding to what Don Branson said, Try not to dismantle or peep into a pile of stones, small cracks. With reference to :"During winter, do most of these reptiles go in some sort of hibernation, or can some/many still be found and seen during the day where there is some sun?" What I've observed is, It is most likely that you may come across a snake/serpent ...


2

I have been recommended to carry a tin can, filled partly with gravel. This will rattle and oust snakes, boars, bears. I have no idea how effective this would be. Playing a musical instrument should have similar effect, as suggested by all the comments.


2

Coyotes now live in our area in significant numbers. There was a den on our property this winter, and a few months ago there were four pups romping around in our back yard. We hear them howling pretty much every night. I've been in the woods and in open fields with coyotes around and never felt threatened or considered it a problem at all. In fact, I ...


2

Obviously safety is usually a relative concept, what seems safe for you might not be for others, so answers here may vary. I don't have experience with geocaching, but I do have a lot of experience with reptiles. I'm a hobbyist wildlife photographer specializing in reptiles, amphibians and insects. When reaching into an unknown area, the safest thing that I ...


1

To add to what others have mentioned, reptiles do indeed go into hibernation, but not in the thought of "traditional" hibernation, such as that of a bear or other mammals. Reptiles usually do burrow down, but they can certainly be awoken. Here in the southeast, if the temperatures rise just a bit, we have plenty of snakes and lizards around sunning ...



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