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14

Do boots really last (only) 400 miles? In short, yes. If you are a hard-man/woman, you might stretch one pair of boots to half the AT. Normal people go through quite a few pairs - I used 10-ish pairs of trail runners on the PCT (Pacific Crest Trail), partially because my feet grew 2 sizes and I didn't realize that was why I was suddenly getting blisters ...


13

If you treat your gear well, it will almost all last a whole thru-hike. Rain Jacket If you have a bad year, you can have 80+ days of rain, and the shoulder straps of your backpack will wear out (delaminate usually) the shoulders of your rain jacket. Shoes are covered over in the other question pretty thoroughly I'd say. Pants: If you wear pants, ...


10

I think what you are trying to get at is the proper etiquette for hiking on the AT during peak season, when the most hikers and backpackers are on the trail. Exactly when peak season is, and how many people you will see at peak season really depends on where you are on the trail. Various places will have different number of Thru-hikers, section-hikers, ...


8

I don't think you need to bypass them at all. You didn't say what time of year you'd be going, but in the later summer/fall, they are not nearly that deep. Also, at any time of year you could easily carry your pack(s) across, then go back and piggy-back your son with a 2nd trip. The first trip would also give you a feel for how rough the crossing would ...


7

I think you need to separate this into two parts: Money spent before the trail starts, and budgeting while on the trail. Before you start, you're going to spend money on gear for sure. Your sleeping bag that was good enough for a weekend trip is now your home... Do you really want to put up with that limp, cold bag for 5-6 months? Same goes with a lot of ...


7

TL;DR It's very difficult if not impossible. Norovirus is very, very contagious. It can be spread: close contact with someone with norovirus – they may breathe out small particles containing the virus that you could inhale touching contaminated surfaces or objects – the virus can survive outside the body for several days eating ...


6

I would suggest you look at a mid range synthetic bag say rated at around 40F this will allow you to use it as a blanket on warmer nights and with a liner or bivy sack you can extend that range down to mid 20's. Although synthetic bags tend to be larger when stuffed (they take up more room in your backpack) they do well even when they get damp which will ...


5

The best strategy is to probably hike an alternate hike. Instead of the traditional NOBO GAME route with a start date at the end of March, you could go SOBO, or do a flip flop, or start early or late. By avoiding the crowds, you reduce your risks. You can also avoid shelters and hostels. Good hygiene, plenty of rest, and a proper diet are also useful for ...


5

Lower half temperatures are quite warm. You'll regularly get 70°F+ at night. I would advise for a lightweight synthetic, as you may also end up damp from rain and sweat. I use a travel sack in the summer. Alternatively a heavy liner may do fine, such as the reactor. I've been hiking down here for years and haven't seen summer temperatures warranting ...


5

It somewhat depends on how warm you sleep and how much you're willing to layer up in your bag. I've met people who claim they used one 30F bag the whole trip (with thick layers at the start, and used as a quilt through the rest of the trip). I would call them "ultralight freaks". The more normal setup is to start with a 0-20F bag, depending on your normal ...


5

You don't mention any first-aid or survival items. I would include a first aid kit with maybe a compass and signaling mirror, maybe a firestarter of some kind. I would think that would add a negligible amount of weight to your rig.


5

In peak season (late spring/summer) most trail etiquette on the AT relates to thru-hikers, but not all of it, and generally is about the same on the whole trail. Thru-hikers are of course those who are continuously hiking the entirety of the Appalachian Trail, north or southbound. This information is essentially entirely based on my experience on the AT and ...


4

Early October should not be overly busy. South bounders (SOBO) starts around July and will be out of Main by that time. North bounders (NOBO) must finish before October 15 and many of them will already have completed the trail. For SOBOs, June-July is the peak season for Maine. There are less than 500 thru hikers per season in this direction. For NOBOs, ...


4

I met a guy who left February 14th, the same day as I did, and he used a 40F Katabatic quilt the whole time. He slept with his down coat and gloves on. I didn't meet many people with 0F bags. I took a 0F Feathered Friends bag and was never uncomfortable. I swapped it out for a 35F bag in early May and had a few cold nights in Northern Virginia. Leaving ...


4

Acquire it 6 months or less before your trip on the AT. There is some controversy but it seems you can probably count on immunity from an exposure to last 6+ months. Some of the best places to acquirer Norovirus (that are easily accessible) are daycare centers and nursing homes. Volunteering at one or more of these institutions, is win/win you get to ...


4

In the civilized world you wash your hands regularly, and food handlers should so and additionally wear gloves so if they carry any pathogen, it's not transmitted to the food. We don't have that luxury during outdoorsman activities such as hiking, but we do have two tools we can use to limit exposure. Carry and use hand sanitizer. Use it before and after ...


3

For a bare essential setup, you'll do just fine. You might want to consider: Better food selection Duct tape Emergency kit Light source Change the water containers Mini-carabiner Prefer non-canned goods because they are lighter, take less space and the resulting trash compacts better. You can find tuna packs too. You can roll duct tape on your poles or ...


3

I suspect you are bringing more items than you have listed, since you've alluded to some of them in the comments. That said, here's what I see as missing or improvable: Flashlight. Is that because you carry it on you? An LED microlight is quite small. Letting your eyes adapt to the dark often works, but sometimes more is needed. Kitchen gear. Are you ...


2

As far as anyone knows, no one has done a triple hike of each of the Triple Crown of Hiking. That said ... None of the three trail conservatories keep very rigorous records; instead they make estimates of trail usage based on trail registers and permit applications. Someone can do the full PCT and the PCTA would never know that they reached the end. The ...


2

In addition to what Russell said, consider that the bag by itself does not need to cover the lowest temperature extremes you will encounter. You can get one good for most of the conditions, then add insulation on unusually cold nights. A space blanket over the bag makes a significant difference. So does wearing socks, long underwear, and a thin polypro ...


2

I've done some short stretches of the AT in near-by areas of NY state which should be about the same as the AT in CT. The trail is well-marked and well-traveled. Wildlife is mostly the standard small woodland animals, but there can also be bears. We have not had trouble finding suitable trees for hoisting a bear bag and have not had a problem with that. ...


1

I'm looking for the exact same thing. I'm using Guthook's AT Guide for Android to figure out bite size pieces of the trail and if it let you mark sections as complete, it'd be absolutely perfect. I'll prolly stick with that and then a printed map with highlighter for that pretty and satisfying map view...


1

I don't know about online website, but you can use a handheld GPS like Etrex to keep track of your progress. And since this stores GPS in a common format, you can import this data into another program that will render it in Google Maps which you can then display on your web browser.


1

I'm not sure that anyone can give you a specific number that will suit your needs. Its worth bearing in mind that the temperature ratings on sleeping bags are created using a somewhat arbitrary test involving a dummy with sensors read more. The good thing about this test is that it creates an objective position from which to judge a sleeping bags insulation ...


1

Although some of the articles there appear to require payment, BackpackingLight have lots of gear lists for different conditions, including both long and short trips. (This list specifically refers to the AT)



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