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11

If you treat your gear well, it will almost all last a whole thru-hike. Rain Jacket If you have a bad year, you can have 80+ days of rain, and the shoulder straps of your backpack will wear out (delaminate usually) the shoulders of your rain jacket. Shoes are covered over in the other question pretty thoroughly I'd say. Pants: If you wear pants, ...


10

Do boots really last (only) 400 miles? In short, yes. If you are a hard-man/woman, you might stretch one pair of boots to half the AT. Normal people go through quite a few pairs - I used 10-ish pairs of trail runners on the PCT, partially because my feet grew 2 sizes and I didn't realize that was why I was suddenly getting blisters from my previously ...


7

I think what you are trying to get at is the proper etiquette for hiking on the AT during peak season, when the most hikers and backpackers are on the trail. Exactly when peak season is, and how many people you will see at peak season really depends on where you are on the trail. Various places will have different number of Thru-hikers, section-hikers, ...


5

In peak season (late spring/summer) most trail etiquette on the AT relates to thru-hikers, but not all of it, and generally is about the same on the whole trail. Thru-hikers are of course those who are continuously hiking the entirety of the Appalachian Trail, north or southbound. This information is essentially entirely based on my experience on the AT and ...


4

It somewhat depends on how warm you sleep and how much you're willing to layer up in your bag. I've met people who claim they used one 30F bag the whole trip (with thick layers at the start, and used as a quilt through the rest of the trip). I would call them "ultralight freaks". The more normal setup is to start with a 0-20F bag, depending on your normal ...


4

I would suggest you look at a mid range synthetic bag say rated at around 40F this will allow you to use it as a blanket on warmer nights and with a liner or bivy sack you can extend that range down to mid 20's. Although synthetic bags tend to be larger when stuffed (they take up more room in your backpack) they do well even when they get damp which will ...


2

Lower half temperatures are quite warm. You'll regularly get 70°F+ at night. I would advise for a lightweight synthetic, as you may also end up damp from rain and sweat. I use a travel sack in the summer. Alternatively a heavy liner may do fine, such as the reactor. I've been hiking down here for years and haven't seen summer temperatures warranting ...


1

Although some of the articles there appear to require payment, BackpackingLight have lots of gear lists for different conditions, including both long and short trips. (This list specifically refers to the AT)



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