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-1

While the following won't absolutely prevent it, it will help: Set up a hand washing station in camp. The easiest one of these is a perforated ladle made from a pop bottle. Size the holes so that it runs water for 10-15 seconds. Provide a foam soap dispenser that has an anti-viral in it. Have a dedicated bucket. The station is set up on a tree near the ...


5

The best strategy is to probably hike an alternate hike. Instead of the traditional NOBO GAME route with a start date at the end of March, you could go SOBO, or do a flip flop, or start early or late. By avoiding the crowds, you reduce your risks. You can also avoid shelters and hostels. Good hygiene, plenty of rest, and a proper diet are also useful for ...


4

Acquire it 6 months or less before your trip on the AT. There is some controversy but it seems you can probably count on immunity from an exposure to last 6+ months. Some of the best places to acquirer Norovirus (that are easily accessible) are daycare centers and nursing homes. Volunteering at one or more of these institutions, is win/win you get to ...


7

TL;DR It's very difficult if not impossible. Norovirus is very, very contagious. It can be spread: close contact with someone with norovirus – they may breathe out small particles containing the virus that you could inhale touching contaminated surfaces or objects – the virus can survive outside the body for several days eating ...


4

In the civilized world you wash your hands regularly, and food handlers should so and additionally wear gloves so if they carry any pathogen, it's not transmitted to the food. We don't have that luxury during outdoorsman activities such as hiking, but we do have two tools we can use to limit exposure. Carry and use hand sanitizer. Use it before and after ...



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