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13

Yes it is, but only for one night in any single spot. Staying multiple nights is considered camping and is not allowed. It is never allowed in national parks. I could only find Dutch references for this, but they all say the same and refer to relevant text in the Austrian lawbooks.


7

tl;dr What you describe is absolutely allowed (using a bivouac to spend one night). If you set up a small camp (described as a "planned bivouac" further in this text), you shouldn't be in a protected area. Bivouac Wikipedia Sleeping one night without a tent or a small igloo. An emergency bivouac is basically allowed everywhere. A planned bivouac ...


6

Having just returned from our trip, I will try to provide a description of how we planned it and how things worked out. When we arrived in Vienna we purchased a topographic map of the Gesause region at a book store. With this in hand, we decided to take a train from Vienna to Gaishorn am See, to the south of the park. The train takes three hours and isn't ...


5

The website of the Heilbronner Hütte has a pretty nifty leaflet concerning the tour you are planning. It is in German but I guess you'll be able to read the graph. Be aware that it states: Diese großartige und abwechslungsreiche aber sehr lange Tour wird nur ausdauernden Berggehern empfohlen. which roughly translates to "This amazing and varied, yet ...


5

One such resource would the website of the Alpenverein. On their website, you can find an interactive hut-finding service. If you click on any of the huts, you will get detailed information about opening dates, services available, possibly a link to a website, etc. Most of this information is in German. If you can't read German, you might try Google ...


5

It is allowed if there's no sign declaring it as Naturschutzgebiet/Naturschutzzone this is german for natural reserve if there's no such sign or you know for sure your not in such a reserve, it's safe to swim legally. However, best practice is to ask at the local tourist information center.


5

The linked topic of @Eyal is a good starting point to get an idea what to expect on those kind of hut treks. I would recommend to get information from online trip reports like on the site you linked to. They already marked the different sections of the Via Alpina where you could pick out 5 sections/days. First of all you should get something to work with ...


4

I can recommend the Verwall-Trek. It is a trek from St. Christoph (Arlberg, near St. Anton) via the Kaltenberghütte, Konstanzer Hütte, Neue Heilbronner Hütte, Friedrichshafener Hütte, Darmstädter Hütte, Niederelbehütte und Edmund-Graf-Hütte to Pettneu. Of course you can adjust the route as you wish. I recommend to fly to Friedrichshafen or Innsbruck and then ...


3

The Hochschwab is a mountain range in Styria. You can find trail information with photos about this region in German or English using Google Translate. You may want to spend a few nights at the same hut to simplify the logistics. You could plan several day hikes from the same hut. There is a beautiful lake that people scuba dive in which is car accessible. ...


3

This is a copy paste from wikipedia: The right to roam in Austria, particularly in forests and mountainous areas, is called Wegefreiheit. Since 1975 the right to roam in forests is guaranteed by Federal law. In particular, walking, running, hiking, and resting are automatically allowed to the public in most forest areas. However, horse riding, ...


2

With the information on the website and g00gle maps, I think the whole parcour should be between 1500m and max. 1600m.



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