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20

In the corridor zone (where you are planning) you are only allowed to camp at designated campgrounds, which are secured on a reservation basis. If they are full, of the options you list, 2. Pray hard a permit is available when I show up is your best bet. The park leaves a percentage of permits unreserved for the main corridor (which includes the Bright ...


11

Depending on your activity level, access to water, etc, the types of food you carry should change accordingly. Some points to consider: Dehydrated foods are great in that they are light-weight since they have no water in them. But they might not be a wise choice if you are dry camping with no water available (e.g. in the desert) since you would just have ...


8

First - Assess the situation and determine if an active rescue is possible and safe. Many would be rescuers are caught or killed in follow up avalanches because they acted without assessing the surrounding conditions. Assuming you have equipment to assist in the rescue follow the guidelines below. Yell to alert your partners and other people that may be ...


8

If you choose to go backpacking in the Sierra Nevada in April, prepare yourself as if you were going in winter, because there will still be significant snow, and you could be hit by a blizzard at any time. To quote the National Park Service: Hiking and backpacking options are still limited in April. Expect snow above 6,000 feet (this varies from year to ...


8

I hike in generally the same area of the country, mostly on the AT around NC and VA. Snakes in this area will be most active during spring and fall months. Generally they will be more active in moderate temperatures. In extreme cold and extreme heat you'll see less snakes. In the summer they will be more active in the early mornings and evenings. During ...


7

By engaging in winter sports (where there is significant snow on the ground) you are already greatly reducing your impact. The biggest impacts to back-country areas from non-motorized recreation come from vegetation disturbance: boots grinding up plants and breaking topsoil, tents compressing vegetation, camp activity destroying vegetation, fire scars, etc. ...


6

I like the other answers (+1). Here is a method based on that described in How To Stay Alive in the Woods by Bradford Angier. You need a stick, another rigid object or string, and a sunny day. In the morning, put the stick in the ground and put a string from the top of the stick down to the tip of the stick's shadow. Mark that location, and then trace a ...


6

This question really made me curious as my wife has asked me the same thing. If you end up finding a better solution than anyone on this site can provide, I ask that you would please share it. I searched the web for a bit and found this website. Allow me to quote the part I found most important. Sponges Isabelle Gauthier of Blood Sisters, an ...


6

You can get a lot of the way towards understanding which ground has a good likelihood of being marshy from full use of Ordnance Survey (or equivalent) maps, and looking at the type of rock in the area you will be hiking. Good quality maps give a lot of detail around topography, so you can look at slopes and heights near watercourses etc. If you are on a ...


6

Most of the food I take on trips is low in sodium content by design, so I usually specifically plan on taking some overly salty foods. Like Jerky, although I have done Pringles on some shorter trips. I used to also take several small disposable salt packets and put one or two in my water bottle when filling up. That much wasn't taste-able, but I was always ...


6

Yes you can. And more to the point, you should (save weight, and leave no trace). I have not found a backpacking cooking mess that could not be cleaned with a combination of (in this order): Tongue Finger Water + Finger (drink it -- truly "Leave No Trace" (its not as bad as you think)) Snow (when available) Pine Needles / plant leaves / grass stalks / ...


5

What I do is carry a small microfiber cloth. First I rinse my dishes, then I swish with a small amount of boiling water (usually left from our post dinner coffee), and wipe with the cloth. Voila, clean dishes. Sorry I missed the part about "found in the wilderness". Given that just skip the cloth and use the water ;) Another note. If the above method ...


5

A nice rule of thumb that I've used is to hold you hand out at arms length, with the first four fingers of your hand parallel to the ground. Your finger's width represents about 15 minutes of sunlight. So, for example, if I held up my hand and measured about 10 finger widths from the horizon to the current location of the sun, there would be somewhere around ...


4

As an update, I arrived at the canyon on May 13th. They had precisely one open slot and thus I was able to hike down to Bright Angel one day, and back up the next. A rim-to-river in a day is doable, but hard. For a first timer, it is definitely worth overnighting and going back up. Especially during May, hiking between about 11 - 3 is really uncomfortable. ...


4

You touched on one thing: fires are often seasonal. Want to avoid fires in the Canadian Rockies? Come in the winter time. Want to risk smoke inhilation in the BC interior, come visit in August. Find out what the situation is in the area you are visiting, for the extent of your visit. Most parks have fire safety levels that clearly indicate weather the fire ...


3

To get the hygiene part out of the way, everybody needs to bring or have access to good (alcohol based) hand sanitizer at all times. For deciding on the size of cooking groups: how large is your cooking pot? At scouting we either set up a base camp where we'll cook for the entire group (25 persons) or when hiking we use smaller gear and would split up in ...


3

This isn't a direct answer to the question, but I want to point out that most ordinary forest fires pose little danger to humans. It is the relatively unusual crown fires which can be very dangerous. In generally dry pine forests, like many parts of the western US, forest fire is a natural and relatively frequent (from the point of view of long-lived ...


3

Disclaimer: I'm also talking from the perspective of not having any experience in packrafts, but more from a general survival standpoint. Is it fine to get started by simply reading info from books, websites etc. and get on the raft, or should one really start with a proper course in safety? I'd say that in certain scenarios it is ok to read up about ...


3

One important part of planning back country trips in the West revolves around bears. I'm basing what I write on my trips to Sequoia and Yosemite (which only have black bears), but it should be relevant since Yellowstone has both black bears and grizzlies (which are more aggressive). You'll need to prepare for them, and one thing that people do (and rangers ...


2

A long time ago, before people had consistent access to Lye or any of the oils we use in soap now, they made it out of what they had on hand. A common one would be wood ash and rendered animal fat ( tallow ). There's guide on eHow on making said soap, but it appears to not only be time intensive ( rest time of over two months total ), but also involves ...


2

My results: That particular April was unusually warm. We needed to be prepared to start hiking in hot weather (70-80F) and end up hiking in 4 feet of snow at higher elevation. Snowshoes are a must. The trail we were on was impossible to follow perfectly in the winter, so be prepared to end up off trail frequently. Cut logs are one helpful indicator of ...


2

Given that the basis for defining time is based on the Earth's rotation and where the Sun is relative to a point on the Earth, it's going to be difficult to estimate the time without knowing where the Sun is (I'll be interested to see the solutions other people have). Note: the following applies in the Northern hemisphere, in the Southern Hemisphere, ...


2

Well, having done both I can safely say that the haute route was harder for me. I've finished the Annapurna in a relatively good condition last year, and finished the haute route with 2 kneepads, a sore ankle and had to buy better trekking poles thru-out the trek (haven't used a trekking pole at all last year). However, my friend Ophir who has done both ...


2

There is one often forgotten thing in skiing that can be harmful. The waxes. The racing ones contain a lot of fluorocarbons that can stay in the environment for ages. The pure racing fluorocarbons (mostly powders) are dangerous even to people applying them and special masks should be worn (see). Consider using just pure hydrocarbon waxes or other waxes ...


2

From the GRCA back-country permit site: Permit Responses Permit requests are responded to through U.S. Mail - never by fax or e-mail. Due to the volume of requests received, the park cannot confirm receipt of requests until they have been fully processed. Please allow at least three weeks for processing. It does suggest that for hiking in ...


1

It's a good idea to reserve you campsite in advance 877-444-6777. If you are thinking about camping in the backcountry areas, you will need a permit (for $20), and it's advisable to consult with a ranger concerning your travel plans. As far as planning your hikes, it's best to visit the site: http://rockymountainnationalpark.com/trails-maps.


1

Some additions to the answer above: Try to walk near bigger trees (no marshland there) Avoid water Use a walking stick or just a stick of wood (you can even use it in case you would have to cross something or help with going up/down or just as help with walking).


1

Some things I have used to keep my skins in good shape Use mild detergent to wash the hairs with a sponge Don't get this on the sticky layer Spray with a 5% bleach solution and let dry, then rinse with water several hours later. If mildew grows, expose the hair sides to the sun for several hours to a day. UV exposure is very damaging to the mildew ...



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