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21

I'm going to say that fit is one of the most important elements. I highly suggest you find yourself a store and try on a lot of backpacks. Make sure you properly adjust them. Usually, someone in a store will be able to help you out. Additionally, the various features you listed are useful for different activities. When buying a pack, consider what you'll be ...


10

Yes! This is a rewarding and awesome experience. I have three children that I take hiking all the time. My youngest is almost a month old and he hasn't been out yet, but will as soon as he has a bit of neck control. I was also raised going on many hikes in my father's pack. I have the old pack that I was carried in and let me tell you, they have made leaps ...


8

Looking at the picture of your new pack, those 'smallish straps' appear to be compression straps to pull in your backpack once you've packed to stop the weight inside from shifting. I'd say they're definitely not for packing external gear. I would avoid hanging anything below my bag - it alters the weight balance, and can strain your back. After one ...


7

Slightly different take here: prevention You should regularly inspect the pack The joining of straps to seams. Can you see stitching? Can the strap move independently of the seam (even a little)? This is easy to reinforce. I turn it inside out, add a piece of fabric over the inside seam, and stitch just a bit past the original (note this can only ...


7

Pack weight - A heavy pack is also some extra Kg on your back. Even though a good pack will put them to good use in distributing the content's weight over your back. Pack frame - Many ultra-light backpacks come with a minimal frame design, or no frame at all. You'd need to use to use your mattress to create a simple frame. Accessibility- The number of ...


6

Hide your pack or move it a bit off the trail. Make sure you do not overdo it and end up not being able to find it back yourself. :-) Although you are in the wood, if you are in a popular area, it is possible that other local visit the same area. I've never heard of people bringing alarms for their bags and don't recommend it. I doubt it will be of any help ...


6

Generally the far from the civilization you go, the safer your things are. Thiefs are operating there where people live or where there are a lot of people. Distant rocks, caves etc. are not their target. I have not heard of something being stolen from someone's luggage in mountains, for example. If some point is at least a few km far from the place where ...


6

I have always viewed packing of backpack in terms of: Ease of access. Distribution of weight to prevent unwanted strain. Distribution of weight is a very important aspect that you have to consider while trekking for a longer duration. Ideally, the heavier things should be closer to your body and the lighter ones away from you. The logic being, the center ...


6

For every item, I weigh up the regularity of use, vs the urgency of use. For example, my kettle and mug and lunch are always right at the top. My medkit, raincoat, light jersey, headlamp and pocket knife are in the side pockets or top pocket. Anything I will only use at camp is at the bottom (so generally, my camp clothing, sleeping stuff, toiletries, etc) ...


6

If your sleeping bag, or its compression bag, doesn't have straps around the outside, you'll need at least four pieces of twine to strap your bag down. Two to loop around the sleeping bag, and two more to link the loops on your bag to the loops on your backpack. Make sure the pieces intended for linking the sleeping bag to the backpack are tied down by the ...


6

What really gets to me, is strap placement. Since I'm a big guy, if the straps on the top half of pack are close, it gets really uncomfortable real fast. So I'd also like to add strap placement on the watch-out list. So I definitely agree that you should buy a backpack hands on. Internet is too much of a gamble for me.


6

The garbage bags are soft and flexible, so they'll fit around stuff a lot easier than a rucksack. As well as being stiffer a rucksack will be divided into different compartments. The volume will include the side pockets and the lid space. Something like the sleeping bag will take up a large space and then other stuff will have to fit around it. Things may ...


5

Buckles, straps and zippers are all relatively easy to replace, but it can be worth taking a spare strap with you in case one fails in the wild. I usually keep one spare 6 ft strap and a pair of 2 ft bungee cords in the bottom of my camping pack - they also have other uses, so aren't entirely dead weight.


4

Pack-Buying Priorities: Comfort Comfort Comfort Workmanship quality Everything else Best Materials: Dyneema (which is the same thing as Spectra): Ultra high-end fiber stronger than Kevlar. Packs made of full Spectra/Dyneema cost $1000-2000. BEWARE there are lots of cheaper packs that claim Spectra or Dyneema, but which only use these high-end fibers ...


4

This gets into the realm of "personal preference" but I would suggest only tie those things on the outside of your pack that you don't want at the end of the day. Anything on the outside will tend to get chewed up by brush, be-thorned by cactus, ground into rocks and dirt every time you set your pack down, get soaked when you slip on that stream crossing, ...


4

I think you won't be able to do much with your existing rucksack, but there are many out there specifically designed to avoid the sweaty back. Deuter make a range of rucksacks with their Airstripes system: This holds the rucksack away from your back as much as possible and allows air to flow over your back to evaporate sweat. Various other manufacturers ...


4

When I pack my backpack in the morning, I sort everything into two categories: Things I will (almost) certainly not need before I set up camp again (sleeping bag, tent, kitchen, most food, etc.) Things I might or certainly will need before I set up camp again. Usually, the two categories don't change. The only item that changes is the items I need for ...


3

I'll echo the most prominent theme in the related question, which is that above all else comfort is the most important consideration in any backpack. The worst backpack is one that ends up causing you pain after a few hours when you have to put up with it for the entire week - so trying on as many as you can is important. If you're at all in doubt after a ...


3

As per The North Face Customer Service: Each strap (not bungee, sorry about that) should have a barrel on one end followed by an overhand knot holding the two ends of the strap. Simply undo the knot, depress the button on the barrel and un-thread one end of the strap. Thread through loops as desired, re-thread through barrel, tie off ends using a 2 ...


3

Trying to stuff your gear into a plastic bag will only give you a lower bound on the pack size. As with many parameters, the backpack size in litres is more to compare different models, not to be taken as an absolute value. Also, different manufacturers tend to use different litres :) A 60–65 litre backpack with an adjustable top is a reasonable first ...


3

As already stressed by others, the backpack has to be comfortable. If the back system does not fit you, other features won’t make a difference. But there are plenty of good back systems and therefore good backpacks to choose from, so here are a few more tips: I like pockets on the hip belt. Good for a small camera, change or handkerchief to keep at hand. I ...


2

We used an Ergo baby carrier when our now 5 year old daughter was too small to walk. I am fairly small (5'2" with a narrow frame), so the bigger backpacks with frames like Kelty didn't fit me. One thing to consider is that once she can walk, your daughter is likely to want in and out frequently so you want something that is easy to so. It's totally ...


2

Generally speaking, straps and buckles don't just fail one day, you can see signs of wear a while in advance. Of course there are exceptions and you should arguably be prepared for these too, but giving the essentials a glance over once in a while can't do any harm. As a general pointer, bear in mind your use case as well. If you know your pack is about to ...


2

I've never had a pack failure 'in the wild' but I think my usual repair kit of duct tape, tie wraps and a bit of paracord should be able to handle most things. Minor strap and buckle failures aren't likely to cause you major problem - but if a shoulder strap fails, that's quite a challenge: Just remember your pack is a vital part of your gear, and look ...


2

I guess it all depends on the pack size of your mummy sleeping bag. Typically army issues haversacks have dimensions of anything ranging between 12x12" to 13"x18" (30x30cm and 33x45cm). If the compression bag that comes with the sleeping bag does not fit when you place it in the haversack, you could use a different compression sack where you could change the ...


2

If you put a sleeping bag on the outside of the pack, you should have it in a stuff sack or something similar that is strong, waterproof, and has loops for straps. A sleeping bag is something you don't want wet or lost. You can strap the stuff sack with the sleeping bag anywhere, probably near the bottom or on top of the pack. I usually pack the sleeping ...


2

This is what backpacks like the Osprey Atmos were designed for. They're slightly elevated/separated from the users back so that ventilation can improve. However, these sorts of backpacks (not just the Atmos) aren't designed to carry heavier loads that conform to the users back. This is because the further the pack is from your back, the more difficult it ...


2

This is a question whose answer depends a lot on personal style and preferences. I prefer an ultralight style of backpacking. For a week without resupply, I would use my Gossamer gear G4, which is a 66 liter pack that weighs 0.9 lb. It's basically a silnylon sack with two arm straps, plus some netting on the outside that contributes to the stated capacity of ...


2

From my experience, I would recommend getting a larger pack, especially if you're planning to do longer trips. Also, if you ever go on a trip in the winter, it will usually require more clothing and possibly larger sleeping bags/mats. For reference, I have a 48L pack and that is enough room (for me) for about a weekend trip. If I'm sharing gear with ...


2

Clip together any unclipped compression straps even if you aren't tightening them, just to reduce the length that flaps around. The adjustment straps on the top and bottom of the shoulder straps should generally be kept loose so you can adjust the load throughout a hike depending on terrain. Osprey hip belt straps are often ridiculously long, however, and ...



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