Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

I'm going to say that fit is one of the most important elements. I highly suggest you find yourself a store and try on a lot of backpacks. Make sure you properly adjust them. Usually, someone in a store will be able to help you out. Additionally, the various features you listed are useful for different activities. When buying a pack, consider what you'll be ...


10

Slightly different take here: prevention You should regularly inspect the pack The joining of straps to seams. Can you see stitching? Can the strap move independently of the seam (even a little)? This is easy to reinforce. I turn it inside out, add a piece of fabric over the inside seam, and stitch just a bit past the original (note this can only ...


10

Yes! This is a rewarding and awesome experience. I have three children that I take hiking all the time. My youngest is almost a month old and he hasn't been out yet, but will as soon as he has a bit of neck control. I was also raised going on many hikes in my father's pack. I have the old pack that I was carried in and let me tell you, they have made leaps ...


8

Looking at the picture of your new pack, those 'smallish straps' appear to be compression straps to pull in your backpack once you've packed to stop the weight inside from shifting. I'd say they're definitely not for packing external gear. I would avoid hanging anything below my bag - it alters the weight balance, and can strain your back. After one ...


7

If your sleeping bag, or its compression bag, doesn't have straps around the outside, you'll need at least four pieces of twine to strap your bag down. Two to loop around the sleeping bag, and two more to link the loops on your bag to the loops on your backpack. Make sure the pieces intended for linking the sleeping bag to the backpack are tied down by the ...


7

Pack weight - A heavy pack is also some extra Kg on your back. Even though a good pack will put them to good use in distributing the content's weight over your back. Pack frame - Many ultra-light backpacks come with a minimal frame design, or no frame at all. You'd need to use to use your mattress to create a simple frame. Accessibility- The number of ...


7

I was a light infantry soldier all we used to do was roll each of the ends and use electrical tape to bind them leaving alowences for adjusting straps. I also advise taking a spare roll of tape just in case you need to use the strap and then have to re bind them


7

I'm assuming you mean whether long and thin things should go in vertically or horizontally, or folded clothes go in horizontal or vertical layers. The advantage of packing vertically is that more of your stuff is easily accessible from the top of the rucksack. Packing horizontally means the things at the bottom are hard to get to. The disadvantage of ...


7

I tend to find that although I plan to pack either horizontally or vertically it never ends up that way, though I've tried both in the past. I now tend to pack in a manner of: How likely am I going to need that item. Will using this item remove it from my pack (food) Will using this item lighten my pack afterwards (gas canister / water bottles) If I ...


6

What really gets to me, is strap placement. Since I'm a big guy, if the straps on the top half of pack are close, it gets really uncomfortable real fast. So I'd also like to add strap placement on the watch-out list. So I definitely agree that you should buy a backpack hands on. Internet is too much of a gamble for me.


6

The garbage bags are soft and flexible, so they'll fit around stuff a lot easier than a rucksack. As well as being stiffer a rucksack will be divided into different compartments. The volume will include the side pockets and the lid space. Something like the sleeping bag will take up a large space and then other stuff will have to fit around it. Things may ...


6

I have always viewed packing of backpack in terms of: Ease of access. Distribution of weight to prevent unwanted strain. Distribution of weight is a very important aspect that you have to consider while trekking for a longer duration. Ideally, the heavier things should be closer to your body and the lighter ones away from you. The logic being, the center ...


6

For every item, I weigh up the regularity of use, vs the urgency of use. For example, my kettle and mug and lunch are always right at the top. My medkit, raincoat, light jersey, headlamp and pocket knife are in the side pockets or top pocket. Anything I will only use at camp is at the bottom (so generally, my camp clothing, sleeping stuff, toiletries, etc) ...


6

Hide your pack or move it a bit off the trail. Make sure you do not overdo it and end up not being able to find it back yourself. :-) Although you are in the wood, if you are in a popular area, it is possible that other local visit the same area. I've never heard of people bringing alarms for their bags and don't recommend it. I doubt it will be of any help ...


6

Generally the far from the civilization you go, the safer your things are. Thiefs are operating there where people live or where there are a lot of people. Distant rocks, caves etc. are not their target. I have not heard of something being stolen from someone's luggage in mountains, for example. If some point is at least a few km far from the place where ...


6

There are any number of ways to do this, but perhaps the simplest is to use something similar to this belt mounting clip and have one of your rucksack straps fed through the belt loops: I would suggest mounting it either on the back of your pack, and allowing the camera to hang lens down, or on the top if you have a pack wide enough to avoid it hitting ...


5

I think you won't be able to do much with your existing rucksack, but there are many out there specifically designed to avoid the sweaty back. Deuter make a range of rucksacks with their Airstripes system: This holds the rucksack away from your back as much as possible and allows air to flow over your back to evaporate sweat. Various other manufacturers ...


5

Buckles, straps and zippers are all relatively easy to replace, but it can be worth taking a spare strap with you in case one fails in the wild. I usually keep one spare 6 ft strap and a pair of 2 ft bungee cords in the bottom of my camping pack - they also have other uses, so aren't entirely dead weight.


5

Personally I have not found backpacks to be very high-maintenance. After a trip I completely empty my pack, shake it out, and wipe off the dust with a damp cloth. If there's sap or other problems I'd try spot cleaning them with mild detergent, but so far I've been lucky. One thing I'm careful to do (with tents and other gear as well as packs) is to prop ...


4

This gets into the realm of "personal preference" but I would suggest only tie those things on the outside of your pack that you don't want at the end of the day. Anything on the outside will tend to get chewed up by brush, be-thorned by cactus, ground into rocks and dirt every time you set your pack down, get soaked when you slip on that stream crossing, ...


4

When I pack my backpack in the morning, I sort everything into two categories: Things I will (almost) certainly not need before I set up camp again (sleeping bag, tent, kitchen, most food, etc.) Things I might or certainly will need before I set up camp again. Usually, the two categories don't change. The only item that changes is the items I need for ...


4

Pack-Buying Priorities: Comfort Comfort Comfort Workmanship quality Everything else Best Materials: Dyneema (which is the same thing as Spectra): Ultra high-end fiber stronger than Kevlar. Packs made of full Spectra/Dyneema cost $1000-2000. BEWARE there are lots of cheaper packs that claim Spectra or Dyneema, but which only use these high-end fibers ...


4

The rucksacks that I own, have extra long straps as well. But the manufacturer has provided an elastic band of sorts on the straps to fold them and tuck them within the band (I'll try to post a pic once I get back home). Another option that I have tried is to tuck these longer straps into the side pockets (water bottle holders) and even tie up a lose knot of ...


4

I ended ordering Condor 2 and find it pretty much perfect for my needs. And answers are : Pretty slim, about 5-8cm. But beware that the bag is so stiff and sturdy that this is not an easy task. It has a rubbery black bottom which grips better to surfaces and protects from moisture. A nice thing is that the bag always stays upright when I put it on the ...


3

It's been a while since I posted this question, but I found an interesting alternative answer some time ago: Loosen your shoulder-straps such that the bottom edge of your backpack rests against your lower back (or butt in some cases I suppose) and the rest of the pack leans away from the rest of your back. Based on very limited fiddling around I did with ...


3

This is what backpacks like the Osprey Atmos were designed for. They're slightly elevated/separated from the users back so that ventilation can improve. However, these sorts of backpacks (not just the Atmos) aren't designed to carry heavier loads that conform to the users back. This is because the further the pack is from your back, the more difficult it ...


3

Trying to stuff your gear into a plastic bag will only give you a lower bound on the pack size. As with many parameters, the backpack size in litres is more to compare different models, not to be taken as an absolute value. Also, different manufacturers tend to use different litres :) A 60–65 litre backpack with an adjustable top is a reasonable first ...


3

As per The North Face Customer Service: Each strap (not bungee, sorry about that) should have a barrel on one end followed by an overhand knot holding the two ends of the strap. Simply undo the knot, depress the button on the barrel and un-thread one end of the strap. Thread through loops as desired, re-thread through barrel, tie off ends using a 2 ...


3

Generally speaking, straps and buckles don't just fail one day, you can see signs of wear a while in advance. Of course there are exceptions and you should arguably be prepared for these too, but giving the essentials a glance over once in a while can't do any harm. As a general pointer, bear in mind your use case as well. If you know your pack is about to ...


3

As already stressed by others, the backpack has to be comfortable. If the back system does not fit you, other features won’t make a difference. But there are plenty of good back systems and therefore good backpacks to choose from, so here are a few more tips: I like pockets on the hip belt. Good for a small camera, change or handkerchief to keep at hand. I ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible