Hot answers tagged

38

The key to keeping your back happy is to drive as much pack weight to your hips as possible. A side note on weight is that the lighter your pack overall, the happier your back. A lot of the packing order depends on your particular pack, but in general, the bottom of a pack is below your hips. Therefore, it is best to put something big and light in the ...


29

A mug outside the backpack is far easier to reach. In some areas, you will pass streams very often. During my first ever backpacking trip, with a group of Swedish people hiking Kaisepakte – Pessiskåtan – Lapporten – Tältlägret – Abisko in September 2005, most people had a mug hanging outside so that they could reach it immediately. Every 5 minutes or so, ...


24

The short answer is, "it depends". Packs sold to women may have only superficial changes compared to the men's version (i.e. the color is different), but there are usually a few common differences: Shorter torso length (distance from shoulder to hip, often shorter in women). Narrower shoulder straps (men tend to have broader shoulders). Shape of shoulder ...


23

I'm going to say that fit is one of the most important elements. I highly suggest you find yourself a store and try on a lot of backpacks. Make sure you properly adjust them. Usually, someone in a store will be able to help you out. Additionally, the various features you listed are useful for different activities. When buying a pack, consider what you'll be ...


22

The ideal weight is zero. The less weight you carry the more you will enjoy your outing. That being said, one should try to minimize their weight within reason. There exist different schools (Ultralight, super-ultralight, etc.) on what one should carry and how much it should weight. REI suggest the following categories: minimalist - Under 12 pounds ...


20

Well, this can somewhat depend on the type of backpack you have and the length of the trip you're planning to take (so how much you will be carrying), but there are a few general principles that apply to almost all situations: From the bottom up: The sleeping bag. Most backpacks have a larger, seperately-zipped area at the bottom that is the most ...


18

Some reasons for the long waist straps are: The most backpacks have only one size for everyone, so the backpack must fit a short/ tall/ tiny/ big person. It also depends what your wear for clothes under your rucksack, if you wear it over a single shirt or over a big insulation-jacket. For alpine backpacks or traveling: the waist straps need to fit around ...


18

The general rule of thumb is to carry no more than a third of your body weight. That should be your max, so the answer is to carry less than that. Make your bag as light as you can. Aside from that it largely depends on your level of strength and fitness, and what you feel comfortable carrying. I tend to carry a heavier bag than most people I hike with, but ...


17

There are quite a few backpacks made of waterproof materials, especially among cottage manufacturers. ZPacks, Hyperlight Mountain Gear, Zimmerbuilt, Gossamer Gear, and many others manufacture packs out of Hybrid Cuben Fiber, Dimension Polyant X-Pac fabrics, or other waterproof materials. Even more mainstream manufacturers use a good deal of waterproof ...


16

Hide your pack or move it a bit off the trail. Make sure you do not overdo it and end up not being able to find it back yourself. :-) Although you are in the wood, if you are in a popular area, it is possible that other local visit the same area. I've never heard of people bringing alarms for their bags and don't recommend it. I doubt it will be of any help ...


16

I was a light infantry soldier all we used to do was roll each of the ends and use electrical tape to bind them leaving alowences for adjusting straps. I also advise taking a spare roll of tape just in case you need to use the strap and then have to re bind them


16

The easiest way to carry a backpack is on your back. If you're looking for a bag for cycling, then you either need to invest in some pannier bags, or some bikepacks: I have a 20L Revelate seat bag on my bike and I love it, I still carry a small backpack, but I try to put all the bulky items in my seat bag. Heavy stuff should go inside a frame bag, but ...


15

Generally the far from the civilization you go, the safer your things are. Thiefs are operating there where people live or where there are a lot of people. Distant rocks, caves etc. are not their target. I have not heard of something being stolen from someone's luggage in mountains, for example. If some point is at least a few km far from the place where ...


15

One option that is super useful when you're travelling in a group is to have different packs for different purposes rather than each person carrying their own stuff. For example we have a "tent pack" and a "kitchen pack". The advantages include: a significant weight difference, which you could use to support hikers of different strengths. it's quicker to ...


15

Stabilizer/Load-lifter/Load-adjuster... Straps Those are stabilizer straps, also known as load lifter or load adjuster straps. You typically have another set of stabilizer straps on your waist belt as well. These straps essentially prevent your bag from flopping around on your back and help balance the load, which will ultimately lift the weight of the bag ...


15

Personally I don't do that, because having something clanging against my pack (or my back) all day is guaranteed to drive me insane. Eating equipment goes inside my pack, along with stoves. If I need a drink during the day, I have a water bottle. If I run out of water and find a stream, I fill the water bottle. No need for a mug during the day. ...


14

You can find smaller backpacks called daypacks but regarding the actual activity they are mostly around 25-35 litre. Smaller packs are often used for biking, trailrunning and as climbing backpack. The last mentioned might not be the right ones for you because you simply don't need to attach a rope or other features of those backpacks. For cycling and ...


13

Do you have 2 split rings (keyrings) with you? If so, here's how to make a buckle like that (or rather its D-ring predecessor): Attach both split rings to the upper strap, where the old buckle is/was. Pass the lower strap up through both split rings and back through the first. Here's an ASCII-art sketch before you pull it tight: ----- | //| ...


11

Looking at the picture of your new pack, those 'smallish straps' appear to be compression straps to pull in your backpack once you've packed to stop the weight inside from shifting. I'd say they're definitely not for packing external gear. I would avoid hanging anything below my bag - it alters the weight balance, and can strain your back. After one ...


11

If your mug is wet, why would you put it inside? If you like a hot drink while packing up, you might have a wet (or even dirty) mug after you've packed anything on which you might dry it. If you do dry it, you might have a damp towel to carry. Many people don't carry anything to dry mugs/cooking equipment anyway.


10

Slightly different take here: prevention You should regularly inspect the pack The joining of straps to seams. Can you see stitching? Can the strap move independently of the seam (even a little)? This is easy to reinforce. I turn it inside out, add a piece of fabric over the inside seam, and stitch just a bit past the original (note this can only ...


10

Yes! This is a rewarding and awesome experience. I have three children that I take hiking all the time. My youngest is almost a month old and he hasn't been out yet, but will as soon as he has a bit of neck control. I was also raised going on many hikes in my father's pack. I have the old pack that I was carried in and let me tell you, they have made leaps ...


10

For every item, I weigh up the regularity of use, vs the urgency of use. For example, my kettle and mug and lunch are always right at the top. My medkit, raincoat, light jersey, headlamp and pocket knife are in the side pockets or top pocket. Anything I will only use at camp is at the bottom (so generally, my camp clothing, sleeping stuff, toiletries, etc) ...


10

I have always viewed packing of backpack in terms of: Ease of access. Distribution of weight to prevent unwanted strain. Distribution of weight is a very important aspect that you have to consider while trekking for a longer duration. Ideally, the heavier things should be closer to your body and the lighter ones away from you. The logic being, the center ...


10

These bags are called stuff sacks, dry sack or compression sack. Often a smaller stuff stack containing the odds and ends is called a ditty bag. You can buy them at any backpacking outfitter. Some backpacking gear such as a tent or sleeping bags will often come with an included stuff sack. Compression bags are use to reduce the volume of some items such as ...


9

If your sleeping bag, or its compression bag, doesn't have straps around the outside, you'll need at least four pieces of twine to strap your bag down. Two to loop around the sleeping bag, and two more to link the loops on your bag to the loops on your backpack. Make sure the pieces intended for linking the sleeping bag to the backpack are tied down by the ...


9

I recently had this problem with a pack and have experimented by sewing on a layer of velour. It's much softer and padded. However it is also VERY warm, which may defeat the purpose of going shirtless.


8

As mentioned in other answers, it will depend on the type of your backpack. You can for example pack like this: First you unbuckle all straps of your backpack, and lay it on the ground. Next to it you spread your ground sheet or shelter half, fold your sleeping bag or blanket on top of it, so it will be about as wide as the central part of your backpack, ...


8

Pack weight - A heavy pack is also some extra Kg on your back. Even though a good pack will put them to good use in distributing the content's weight over your back. Pack frame - Many ultra-light backpacks come with a minimal frame design, or no frame at all. You'd need to use to use your mattress to create a simple frame. Accessibility- The number of ...


8

I use a pac safe metal mesh for my plane travel as my pack is a camping pack not a travel pack with lockable pockets. http://www.blessthisstuff.com/stuff/wear/bags-luggage/bag-protector-by-pacsafe/ With a simple padlock and the length of cable you should be able to link it to a tree and put the key in your pocket or around your neck.



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