Hot answers tagged

18

The ideal weight is zero. The less weight you carry the more you will enjoy your outing. That being said, one should try to minimize their weight within reason. There exist different schools (Ultralight, super-ultralight, etc.) on what one should carry and how much it should weight. REI suggest the following categories: minimalist - Under 12 pounds ...


17

There are quite a few backpacks made of waterproof materials, especially among cottage manufacturers. ZPacks, Hyperlight Mountain Gear, Zimmerbuilt, Gossamer Gear, and many others manufacture packs out of Hybrid Cuben Fiber, Dimension Polyant X-Pac fabrics, or other waterproof materials. Even more mainstream manufacturers use a good deal of waterproof ...


13

The general rule of thumb is to carry no more than a third of your body weight. That should be your max, so the answer is to carry less than that. Make your bag as light as you can. Aside from that it largely depends on your level of strength and fitness, and what you feel comfortable carrying. I tend to carry a heavier bag than most people I hike with, but ...


13

Do you have 2 split rings (keyrings) with you? If so, here's how to make a buckle like that (or rather its D-ring predecessor): Attach both split rings to the upper strap, where the old buckle is/was. Pass the lower strap up through both split rings and back through the first. Here's an ASCII-art sketch before you pull it tight: ----- | //| ...


10

These bags are called stuff sacks, dry sack or compression sack. Often a smaller stuff stack containing the odds and ends is called a ditty bag. You can buy them at any backpacking outfitter. Some backpacking gear such as a tent or sleeping bags will often come with an included stuff sack. Compression bags are use to reduce the volume of some items such as ...


8

According to the features list for The North Face Men's Borealis Pack, that is called a: Front elastic bungee for external storage


7

Assuming that you have the right kind of a backpack according to your requirements. First, you need to separate things that you need frequently and things you'll need less often. The way I camp/trek and plan things, I am okay to pack everything all over again in the morning. Generally, it is best suited to pack lighter items in the bottom of the pack and ...


7

This is an out there solution but may very well work. Automotive stores sell seat belt pads, they velcro together. From what I remember they aren't too pricey and I know for a fact you can get a pair in Brazil. This is what I'm referring to. http://www.drivingcomfort.com/travel-with-kids/microfiber-memory-foam-seatbelt-pad.cfm Best of luck and I hope you ...


6

It looks like the waterproof coating is flaking off. Try washing with a cloth and warm soap and water. I've had reasonable success with this method in the past.


6

Feed the strap through the remains of the buckle, or the fabric loop it was formerly attached to. Then tie the strap to itself using a rolling hitch. By sliding the rolling hitch up and down the strap, you will be able to alter its effective length.


5

The only knot that's I'm aware of that's any good at securing straps like that is a water knot. though I'm not convinced it's going to work in your case. You don't have a lot of slack, it tends to slip and it's not very adjustable. A better solution to your problem I think might be to change how your backpack works. Remove the strap that works from the ...


5

How many days is "multiple"? In what environment? Can you sleep out in the open or do you need a tent? Can you share the tent with other people? Do you need to bring all food? Water (then you're screwed)? All of this influences how low you can get the weight, but in general: the ideal weight is as heavy as necessary to bring the stuff you absolutely need, ...


5

The complexity of backpacks, as well as the typical use case scenario has a lot to do with why the backpacks themselves aren't waterproofed. For example, the typical day in the life of a bicycle pannier involves relatively little exposure to water. You take it out in the rain for an hour or two, and then usually you take it inside with you wherever you go. ...


5

I use a pac safe metal mesh for my plane travel as my pack is a camping pack not a travel pack with lockable pockets. http://www.blessthisstuff.com/stuff/wear/bags-luggage/bag-protector-by-pacsafe/ With a simple padlock and the length of cable you should be able to link it to a tree and put the key in your pocket or around your neck.


5

It looks like the webbing for the sternum strap is similar size to the webbing for the shoulder strap. In this pack you could unthread the left side of the sternum strap buckle (keeping the snap buckle), then thread in webbing that was attached to the broken buckle. This is a quick, easy repair that won't require any extra parts. As a bonus you can use ...


5

If your reason for not wanting camo is that you want to be obvious (maybe to other hunters so you don't get shot) then you can always flash a backpack with reflective material, or use a hi vis pack cover such as those recommended for cyclists. Home-modding a rucksack to incorporate the barrel ties and stock pocket probably wouldn't take you too long if you ...


4

Just a suggestion, you could try putting a small amount of something abrasive (such as rock salt or perhaps gravel) into the bag, closing the bag securely with a zip tie on the zipper pulls & placing it in a clothes drier on the Fluff setting (no heat) for some period of time. Or if putting it in the drier makes you nervous, you could try agitating it ...


4

That's simply elastic cord threaded through tie out loops on your bag. It's used to lash everything that can't fit inside your bag (extra layers/jacket), things that you don't want inside your bag (wet/muddy clothes or sharp pokey crampons), or things that you want quick access to onto the outside of your bag (wind breaker/gaiters/rain jacket). When I'm ...


4

The bag pictured, a Karrimor Bobcat, for some unexplainable reason has a single anchor point on the underside. Two is common, none is understandable, but one makes no sense- tying your sleeping bag on there would cause it to swing around and twirl, unless you went in for some complicated lashing. In any case, as you noted, it's better to have your bag inside ...


4

It's fairly easy, with modern gear, to be around one third to one quarter of your body weight, including food, water, and camera. Some tips applicable to Colorado (and thus most places): Bring a tent. It rains, water flows, there are bugs. Tarps and hammocks are lighter, but not nearly as fun in these conditions. Use a sleeping bag and a pad. The pad ...


3

Those are stuff-sacks, and they're usually fabric. The general principle for loading a pack is to put things you'll need during the day on top, and things you won't need until night on the bottom. Regardless, if it takes an hour to do that, you're overthinking it.


3

I have the same pack, and I've never noticed an issue like this. I find it interesting that the sway is resolved by undoing the buckles from the hip belt to the pack- I don't have mine in front of me, but based on my memory those are not a primary load-bearing component, and the velcro would be sufficient on its own. It sounds like this is related to the ...


3

Packing a backpack is pretty simple, but there are some tips to make the process easier and to get you better results. Ideally, a well-loaded pack will feel balanced when resting on your hips and nothing should be shifting or swaying inside. As you walk, the pack should feel stable and predictable, one with your upper body. If possible, first pack your ...


3

Assuming that you have the right kind of a backpack according to your requirements. First, you need to separate things that you need frequently and things you'll need less often. The way I camp/trek and plan things, I am okay to pack everything all over again in the morning. Generally, it is best suited to pack lighter items in the bottom of the pack and ...


3

Carry a spare Things break. If you're expecting to be far enough for long enough, it helps to be able to repair your gear. In addition to needle and thread, I have in my rucksack a half-meter of webbing with two different spare buckles on it, it takes very little space, weight and money but has saved me a lot of pain a few times already.


3

I've found some! I've searched a little bit and stumbled over a few. For example the "Halti Kauris": One is even able to remove the "rifle holder" and use it as a completely common backpack. Or the "Wisport Forester": Also I came across these beauties: But as wonderful as they are, they are expensive and the backpacks quite small.


2

First-in = Last-out. In order: Sleeping bag Those three more or less together, the heavier pieces closer to the back Sleeping pad (if fits in the backpack) Camp clothes Tent Camp stuff, mostly: Food (Except for day food) Kitchen Book Depending on the weather Extra day clothes if any Rain shell if any Stuff that need to be accessible in top/side ...


2

Assuming that you have the right kind of a backpack according to your requirements. First, you need to separate things that you need frequently and things you'll need less often. The way I camp/trek and plan things, I am okay to pack everything all over again in the morning. Generally, it is best suited to pack lighter items in the bottom of the pack and ...


2

I was reading you post and thought of something. And its free. Works for small light backpack. You have to put something semi rigid/flexible (like cardboard) at the inside back panel of your bag. Cardboard should do. You attach the waist straps through the top handle. It form like a triangle. You tighten it until the back panel bends a little. Unless you ...


2

I tried using Goo Gone on a small portion of a pack like this. It did not work very well. I then tried a rubber cement eraser (It is basically a hard piece of rubber that gathers up loose pieces of the cement for graphic arts work.) That did not work. Renisis was on the right track. I tried a fine grained paint sanding block (Home Depot). That took off ...



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