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18

Some reasons for the long waist straps are: The most backpacks have only one size for everyone, so the backpack must fit a short/ tall/ tiny/ big person. It also depends what your wear for clothes under your rucksack, if you wear it over a single shirt or over a big insulation-jacket. For alpine backpacks or traveling: the waist straps need to fit around ...


14

You can find smaller backpacks called daypacks but regarding the actual activity they are mostly around 25-35 litre. Smaller packs are often used for biking, trailrunning and as climbing backpack. The last mentioned might not be the right ones for you because you simply don't need to attach a rope or other features of those backpacks. For cycling and ...


13

Stabilizer/Load-lifter/Load-adjuster... Straps Those are stabilizer straps, also known as load lifter or load adjuster straps. You typically have another set of stabilizer straps on your waist belt as well. These straps essentially prevent your bag from flopping around on your back and help balance the load, which will ultimately lift the weight of the bag ...


9

I recently had this problem with a pack and have experimented by sewing on a layer of velour. It's much softer and padded. However it is also VERY warm, which may defeat the purpose of going shirtless.


7

This is an out there solution but may very well work. Automotive stores sell seat belt pads, they velcro together. From what I remember they aren't too pricey and I know for a fact you can get a pair in Brazil. This is what I'm referring to. http://www.drivingcomfort.com/travel-with-kids/microfiber-memory-foam-seatbelt-pad.cfm Best of luck and I hope you ...


7

Chafing occurs when skin rubs against something whether other skin, clothing, or gear. Staying clean, dry, and reducing friction are the ways to prevent any kind of chafing. As Ben said above that your hip belt may need be used the way it should be. I struggled with heavy packs, so I started following a way to adjust my pack this way: Loosen all the ...


7

According to the features list for The North Face Men's Borealis Pack, that is called a: Front elastic bungee for external storage


5

It looks like the waterproof coating is flaking off. Try washing with a cloth and warm soap and water. I've had reasonable success with this method in the past.


5

This is the response I gave to a similar question ....This is designed to slightly pull your shoulders back and evenly distribute the weight across your back (i.e. so that the weight doesn't simply sit on your lower back). Pull these tight so that you feel the weight move up slightly (to the middle of your back) and doesn't sit too low. You ...


4

This is the bag: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/high-sierra-whitewater-hydration-backpack-insulated-2l~p~1071h/ If you didn't know it was a hydration pack, the water bladder must have been removed. While the posts about "daypacks" are somewhat correct, most of the time when I see super-small backpacks, they are like yours - hydration packs that have ...


4

I think the answer is, it depends... :) Snowboard back protectors come in several guises, some better than others: Snowboard packs (with protectors) are similar. I would suggest that a protector (stand alone, not built into a pack) is going to offer much better protection than any back pack can offer. Main difference The main difference appears to ...


4

The bag pictured, a Karrimor Bobcat, for some unexplainable reason has a single anchor point on the underside. Two is common, none is understandable, but one makes no sense- tying your sleeping bag on there would cause it to swing around and twirl, unless you went in for some complicated lashing. In any case, as you noted, it's better to have your bag inside ...


3

Just a suggestion, you could try putting a small amount of something abrasive (such as rock salt or perhaps gravel) into the bag, closing the bag securely with a zip tie on the zipper pulls & placing it in a clothes drier on the Fluff setting (no heat) for some period of time. Or if putting it in the drier makes you nervous, you could try agitating it ...


3

That's simply elastic cord threaded through tie out loops on your bag. It's used to lash everything that can't fit inside your bag (extra layers/jacket), things that you don't want inside your bag (wet/muddy clothes or sharp pokey crampons), or things that you want quick access to onto the outside of your bag (wind breaker/gaiters/rain jacket). When I'm ...


3

Such small bags are often known as daysacks. However, in my experience the best way to search for bags is by their size. Bag size is generally measured in L (even in the US I think). Most larger bags will have their size in the name. Some smaller bags don't, but is you can find the bag online it will generally have size information. Looking at this bag I ...


2

I have the same pack, and I've never noticed an issue like this. I find it interesting that the sway is resolved by undoing the buckles from the hip belt to the pack- I don't have mine in front of me, but based on my memory those are not a primary load-bearing component, and the velcro would be sufficient on its own. It sounds like this is related to the ...


2

I was reading you post and thought of something. And its free. Works for small light backpack. You have to put something semi rigid/flexible (like cardboard) at the inside back panel of your bag. Cardboard should do. You attach the waist straps through the top handle. It form like a triangle. You tighten it until the back panel bends a little. Unless you ...


2

155cm quite short but not extremely so. I would be surprised if you can't get a decent fit with that sort of pack. To make sure you are fitting the pack correctly see this question or many other guides on the internet. From your description 3 sounds not too bad and pretty much how my pack is. 2 is the one you definitely want to avoid is straps digging into ...


1

I tried using Goo Gone on a small portion of a pack like this. It did not work very well. I then tried a rubber cement eraser (It is basically a hard piece of rubber that gathers up loose pieces of the cement for graphic arts work.) That did not work. Renisis was on the right track. I tried a fine grained paint sanding block (Home Depot). That took off ...


1

This youtube video offers another option that I have found useful: Managing excess webbing straps on backpacks etc. I purchased what is called in the US "Velcro One Wrap" at a fabric store, around $5 for a 3/4" x 4' roll. Much more than I needed for one backpack, over half is left over.



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