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14

You can find smaller backpacks called daypacks but regarding the actual activity they are mostly around 25-35 litre. Smaller packs are often used for biking, trailrunning and as climbing backpack. The last mentioned might not be the right ones for you because you simply don't need to attach a rope or other features of those backpacks. For cycling and ...


8

I tend to find that although I plan to pack either horizontally or vertically it never ends up that way, though I've tried both in the past. I now tend to pack in a manner of: How likely am I going to need that item. Will using this item remove it from my pack (food) Will using this item lighten my pack afterwards (gas canister / water bottles) If I ...


7

I have always viewed packing of backpack in terms of: Ease of access. Distribution of weight to prevent unwanted strain. Distribution of weight is a very important aspect that you have to consider while trekking for a longer duration. Ideally, the heavier things should be closer to your body and the lighter ones away from you. The logic being, the center ...


7

For every item, I weigh up the regularity of use, vs the urgency of use. For example, my kettle and mug and lunch are always right at the top. My medkit, raincoat, light jersey, headlamp and pocket knife are in the side pockets or top pocket. Anything I will only use at camp is at the bottom (so generally, my camp clothing, sleeping stuff, toiletries, etc) ...


7

I was a light infantry soldier all we used to do was roll each of the ends and use electrical tape to bind them leaving alowences for adjusting straps. I also advise taking a spare roll of tape just in case you need to use the strap and then have to re bind them


7

I recently had this problem with a pack and have experimented by sewing on a layer of velour. It's much softer and padded. However it is also VERY warm, which may defeat the purpose of going shirtless.


7

I'm assuming you mean whether long and thin things should go in vertically or horizontally, or folded clothes go in horizontal or vertical layers. The advantage of packing vertically is that more of your stuff is easily accessible from the top of the rucksack. Packing horizontally means the things at the bottom are hard to get to. The disadvantage of ...


6

There are any number of ways to do this, but perhaps the simplest is to use something similar to this belt mounting clip and have one of your rucksack straps fed through the belt loops: I would suggest mounting it either on the back of your pack, and allowing the camera to hang lens down, or on the top if you have a pack wide enough to avoid it hitting ...


6

Back length The first one to get right is the back length; loosen everything off (so you can wear it but nothing is tight) and put the pack on and see how it sits. You want the waist straps to sit just above your hips. If they don't adjust the back length (up or down). Once this is set don't alter it. The other straps will likely alter depending on your ...


5

Personally I have not found backpacks to be very high-maintenance. After a trip I completely empty my pack, shake it out, and wipe off the dust with a damp cloth. If there's sap or other problems I'd try spot cleaning them with mild detergent, but so far I've been lucky. One thing I'm careful to do (with tents and other gear as well as packs) is to prop ...


5

When I pack my backpack in the morning, I sort everything into two categories: Things I will (almost) certainly not need before I set up camp again (sleeping bag, tent, kitchen, most food, etc.) Things I might or certainly will need before I set up camp again. Usually, the two categories don't change. The only item that changes is the items I need for ...


4

The rucksacks that I own, have extra long straps as well. But the manufacturer has provided an elastic band of sorts on the straps to fold them and tuck them within the band (I'll try to post a pic once I get back home). Another option that I have tried is to tuck these longer straps into the side pockets (water bottle holders) and even tie up a lose knot of ...


4

I ended ordering Condor 2 and find it pretty much perfect for my needs. And answers are : Pretty slim, about 5-8cm. But beware that the bag is so stiff and sturdy that this is not an easy task. It has a rubbery black bottom which grips better to surfaces and protects from moisture. A nice thing is that the bag always stays upright when I put it on the ...


4

I think the answer is, it depends... :) Snowboard back protectors come in several guises, some better than others: Snowboard packs (with protectors) are similar. I would suggest that a protector (stand alone, not built into a pack) is going to offer much better protection than any back pack can offer. Main difference The main difference appears to ...


4

Chafing occurs when skin rubs against something whether other skin, clothing, or gear. Staying clean, dry, and reducing friction are the ways to prevent any kind of chafing. As Ben said above that your hip belt may need be used the way it should be. I struggled with heavy packs, so I started following a way to adjust my pack this way: Loosen all the ...


4

This is the bag: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/high-sierra-whitewater-hydration-backpack-insulated-2l~p~1071h/ If you didn't know it was a hydration pack, the water bladder must have been removed. While the posts about "daypacks" are somewhat correct, most of the time when I see super-small backpacks, they are like yours - hydration packs that have ...


3

Such small bags are often known as daysacks. However, in my experience the best way to search for bags is by their size. Bag size is generally measured in L (even in the US I think). Most larger bags will have their size in the name. Some smaller bags don't, but is you can find the bag online it will generally have size information. Looking at this bag I ...


3

Carabiners on the shoulder straps can add two bags of easy-access items. Just don't put more than several kilograms inside, the shoulder straps soft mesh could get damaged. Carabiners on the waist strap can comfortably fit sandals or other shoes. Get the lightest carabiners possible, for example this for bags and something larger, but still light, not ...


3

Look a the Peak Design Capture Camera Clip. It is designed to attach to the strap of a backpack or a belt. The clip screws on around your backpack strap, and a quick-release plate screws onto the tripod socket on your camera. Then that slides into the clip, and locks in place. So it should be easy to take the camera on or off while walking.


3

It's been a while since I posted this question, but I found an interesting alternative answer some time ago: Loosen your shoulder-straps such that the bottom edge of your backpack rests against your lower back (or butt in some cases I suppose) and the rest of the pack leans away from the rest of your back. Based on very limited fiddling around I did with ...


3

I'll echo the most prominent theme in the related question, which is that above all else comfort is the most important consideration in any backpack. The worst backpack is one that ends up causing you pain after a few hours when you have to put up with it for the entire week - so trying on as many as you can is important. If you're at all in doubt after a ...


3

From my experience, I would recommend getting a larger pack, especially if you're planning to do longer trips. Also, if you ever go on a trip in the winter, it will usually require more clothing and possibly larger sleeping bags/mats. For reference, I have a 48L pack and that is enough room (for me) for about a weekend trip. If I'm sharing gear with ...


2

Clip together any unclipped compression straps even if you aren't tightening them, just to reduce the length that flaps around. The adjustment straps on the top and bottom of the shoulder straps should generally be kept loose so you can adjust the load throughout a hike depending on terrain. Osprey hip belt straps are often ridiculously long, however, and ...


2

This is a question whose answer depends a lot on personal style and preferences. I prefer an ultralight style of backpacking. For a week without resupply, I would use my Gossamer gear G4, which is a 66 liter pack that weighs 0.9 lb. It's basically a silnylon sack with two arm straps, plus some netting on the outside that contributes to the stated capacity of ...


2

Stuff is first put into plastic bags according to type. I use different coloured carrier bags so I can tell what is in each bag easily. There may be bags for small things within a larger bag. The pack is fully waterproof and only has an opening at the top. First goes in clothes. Underwear and socks. (For a soft landing when I drop the bag on the ground.) ...


2

I have used rubber bands, kitchen ties, pipe cleaners, half-broken shoelaces and whatever other pieces of small cord I've been able to place my hands on. All except the rubber bands worked well but none worked for more than a day or two. The rubber bands snapped too easily and I felt a little guilty about leaving little scraps of rubber lying in the ...


2

As all rucksacks and packs I own have areas of webbing on most sides, I tie up any long straps with multiple half-hitches onto the webbing, so I still have the full length of the straps - in case I need them - but have them safely out the way.


2

Personally I would not want to mount a camera on a backpack. Sooner or later you're going to slip or bump into something and the camera is going to get hurt. Mounted on the backpack doesn't sound like it will be easily available. If you're not walking around ready to take a picture as the right situation arises, then put the camera in the pack. You say ...


1

I would recommend a soft open frameless pack, like a Duluth, which is made of canvas. We can fit three food barrels into our Duluth, but they are olive barrels (watertight) not the standard blue ones. I looked at the 115 L dry bags on the MEC site and it looks like your barrel might just squeeze into one, though paying for a drybag and then putting something ...


1

I've found a few different ways to do this. Each with it's own pros and cons. BlackRapid shoulder strap Toploader chest pouch CottonCarrier Vest CottonCarrier Strapshot Personally I go between the CottonCarrier vest which offers the fastest access and the Toploader chest pouch if I'm worried about the weather. Your camera just clips into the ...



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