Hot answers tagged

29

A mug outside the backpack is far easier to reach. In some areas, you will pass streams very often. During my first ever backpacking trip, with a group of Swedish people hiking Kaisepakte – Pessiskåtan – Lapporten – Tältlägret – Abisko in September 2005, most people had a mug hanging outside so that they could reach it immediately. Every 5 minutes or so, ...


24

The short answer is, "it depends". Packs sold to women may have only superficial changes compared to the men's version (i.e. the color is different), but there are usually a few common differences: Shorter torso length (distance from shoulder to hip, often shorter in women). Narrower shoulder straps (men tend to have broader shoulders). Shape of shoulder ...


22

The ideal weight is zero. The less weight you carry the more you will enjoy your outing. That being said, one should try to minimize their weight within reason. There exist different schools (Ultralight, super-ultralight, etc.) on what one should carry and how much it should weight. REI suggest the following categories: minimalist - Under 12 pounds ...


18

The general rule of thumb is to carry no more than a third of your body weight. That should be your max, so the answer is to carry less than that. Make your bag as light as you can. Aside from that it largely depends on your level of strength and fitness, and what you feel comfortable carrying. I tend to carry a heavier bag than most people I hike with, but ...


17

There are quite a few backpacks made of waterproof materials, especially among cottage manufacturers. ZPacks, Hyperlight Mountain Gear, Zimmerbuilt, Gossamer Gear, and many others manufacture packs out of Hybrid Cuben Fiber, Dimension Polyant X-Pac fabrics, or other waterproof materials. Even more mainstream manufacturers use a good deal of waterproof ...


16

The easiest way to carry a backpack is on your back. If you're looking for a bag for cycling, then you either need to invest in some pannier bags, or some bikepacks: I have a 20L Revelate seat bag on my bike and I love it, I still carry a small backpack, but I try to put all the bulky items in my seat bag. Heavy stuff should go inside a frame bag, but ...


15

Personally I don't do that, because having something clanging against my pack (or my back) all day is guaranteed to drive me insane. Eating equipment goes inside my pack, along with stoves. If I need a drink during the day, I have a water bottle. If I run out of water and find a stream, I fill the water bottle. No need for a mug during the day. ...


13

Do you have 2 split rings (keyrings) with you? If so, here's how to make a buckle like that (or rather its D-ring predecessor): Attach both split rings to the upper strap, where the old buckle is/was. Pass the lower strap up through both split rings and back through the first. Here's an ASCII-art sketch before you pull it tight: ----- | //| ...


11

These bags are called stuff sacks, dry sack or compression sack. Often a smaller stuff stack containing the odds and ends is called a ditty bag. You can buy them at any backpacking outfitter. Some backpacking gear such as a tent or sleeping bags will often come with an included stuff sack. Compression bags are use to reduce the volume of some items such as ...


11

If your mug is wet, why would you put it inside? If you like a hot drink while packing up, you might have a wet (or even dirty) mug after you've packed anything on which you might dry it. If you do dry it, you might have a damp towel to carry. Many people don't carry anything to dry mugs/cooking equipment anyway.


9

The only answer is to go to a store and try on the sack for real. Take your actual gear to try with it, and use your normal packing technique. Try to choose a store with a trained fitter. Then take it home on appro and try it around the house for a few hours so you can return it if it doesn't carry well for you. It's worth the effort - a badly fitting pack ...


8

I use a pac safe metal mesh for my plane travel as my pack is a camping pack not a travel pack with lockable pockets. http://www.blessthisstuff.com/stuff/wear/bags-luggage/bag-protector-by-pacsafe/ With a simple padlock and the length of cable you should be able to link it to a tree and put the key in your pocket or around your neck.


8

According to the features list for The North Face Men's Borealis Pack, that is called a: Front elastic bungee for external storage


8

How many days is "multiple"? In what environment? Can you sleep out in the open or do you need a tent? Can you share the tent with other people? Do you need to bring all food? Water (then you're screwed)? All of this influences how low you can get the weight, but in general: the ideal weight is as heavy as necessary to bring the stuff you absolutely need, ...


7

Assuming that you have the right kind of a backpack according to your requirements. First, you need to separate things that you need frequently and things you'll need less often. The way I camp/trek and plan things, I am okay to pack everything all over again in the morning. Generally, it is best suited to pack lighter items in the bottom of the pack and ...


7

First, what are your priorities? At one end of the scale you have fastpackers who aim to cover as much ground as possible and damn the discomfort. At the other end, you have people who want to hike a few miles and sit around a fire in their camp chairs cracking open ice-cold beers. These two groups have very different priorities. Most of us are somewhere in ...


7

In general I'd agree with Liam's answer that you should strap your gear onto the bike using a rack and/or panniers. On smooth terrain I'd take this route every time. The one time I'd disagree is if you're mountain biking over rough terrain. Adding weight to the bike is going to make your bike less nimble. Also if you're strapping a backpack on a bike rack ...


7

In my experience, as a mountain biker of 20-years, you want to seek weight minimization and distribution. A heavy pack (assuming a non-trivial ride length) is going to cause your lower back to hurt, make you hotter (back can't breathe), and put additional stress on the palms of your hands - all of which become more problematic the longer you ride. A ...


6

It looks like the waterproof coating is flaking off. Try washing with a cloth and warm soap and water. I've had reasonable success with this method in the past.


6

It's fairly easy, with modern gear, to be around one third to one quarter of your body weight, including food, water, and camera. Some tips applicable to Colorado (and thus most places): Bring a tent. It rains, water flows, there are bugs. Tarps and hammocks are lighter, but not nearly as fun in these conditions. Use a sleeping bag and a pad. The pad ...


6

Feed the strap through the remains of the buckle, or the fabric loop it was formerly attached to. Then tie the strap to itself using a rolling hitch. By sliding the rolling hitch up and down the strap, you will be able to alter its effective length.


6

It all comes down to fit. Try it on as you would any pack. If it spreads weight the way it should... go for it!


6

There are three important aspects: Maneuverability, exposure to wind and firm attachment. The optimal orientation for all of those is vertical. Most of the board is then covered by the body so there is minimal added wind resistance compared with horizontal mounting, were most of the board sticks out on the side and act as a huge sail. With horizontal ...


6

If you're going to lower your that way I think you will have to expect it to get some bruises. However there is gear especially designed for situations like yours: In bigwall climbing (that means spending a lot of time in a wall, usually with a lot of gear) so called haul bags are used exactly for the purpose of hauling gear up and down the wall. These are ...


5

The complexity of backpacks, as well as the typical use case scenario has a lot to do with why the backpacks themselves aren't waterproofed. For example, the typical day in the life of a bicycle pannier involves relatively little exposure to water. You take it out in the rain for an hour or two, and then usually you take it inside with you wherever you go. ...


5

Here is some useful advice from "How to keep your backpack safe", an article on StartBackpacking.com. It's aimed at backpacking travellers rather than hikers, but some of the advice is still relevant. Here are some easy tips for not becoming one of the unlucky people who lose bags: Don’t Be Too Patriotic Consider your home country’s political ...


5

The only knot that's I'm aware of that's any good at securing straps like that is a water knot. though I'm not convinced it's going to work in your case. You don't have a lot of slack, it tends to slip and it's not very adjustable. A better solution to your problem I think might be to change how your backpack works. Remove the strap that works from the ...


5

It looks like the webbing for the sternum strap is similar size to the webbing for the shoulder strap. In this pack you could unthread the left side of the sternum strap buckle (keeping the snap buckle), then thread in webbing that was attached to the broken buckle. This is a quick, easy repair that won't require any extra parts. As a bonus you can use ...


5

If your reason for not wanting camo is that you want to be obvious (maybe to other hunters so you don't get shot) then you can always flash a backpack with reflective material, or use a hi vis pack cover such as those recommended for cyclists. Home-modding a rucksack to incorporate the barrel ties and stock pocket probably wouldn't take you too long if you ...


5

You want to keep your centre of gravity quite low, so it depends on how heavy the stuff your carrying is. If it's light wear it on your back, if it's heavy put it on the carrier.



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