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18

Some reasons for the long waist straps are: The most backpacks have only one size for everyone, so the backpack must fit a short/ tall/ tiny/ big person. It also depends what your wear for clothes under your rucksack, if you wear it over a single shirt or over a big insulation-jacket. For alpine backpacks or traveling: the waist straps need to fit around ...


14

You can find smaller backpacks called daypacks but regarding the actual activity they are mostly around 25-35 litre. Smaller packs are often used for biking, trailrunning and as climbing backpack. The last mentioned might not be the right ones for you because you simply don't need to attach a rope or other features of those backpacks. For cycling and ...


12

Stabilizer/Load-lifter/Load-adjuster... Straps Those are stabilizer straps, also known as load lifter or load adjuster straps. You typically have another set of stabilizer straps on your waist belt as well. These straps essentially prevent your bag from flopping around on your back and help balance the load, which will ultimately lift the weight of the bag ...


11

I was a light infantry soldier all we used to do was roll each of the ends and use electrical tape to bind them leaving alowences for adjusting straps. I also advise taking a spare roll of tape just in case you need to use the strap and then have to re bind them


8

I tend to find that although I plan to pack either horizontally or vertically it never ends up that way, though I've tried both in the past. I now tend to pack in a manner of: How likely am I going to need that item. Will using this item remove it from my pack (food) Will using this item lighten my pack afterwards (gas canister / water bottles) If I ...


8

I'm assuming you mean whether long and thin things should go in vertically or horizontally, or folded clothes go in horizontal or vertical layers. The advantage of packing vertically is that more of your stuff is easily accessible from the top of the rucksack. Packing horizontally means the things at the bottom are hard to get to. The disadvantage of ...


8

I recently had this problem with a pack and have experimented by sewing on a layer of velour. It's much softer and padded. However it is also VERY warm, which may defeat the purpose of going shirtless.


7

This is an out there solution but may very well work. Automotive stores sell seat belt pads, they velcro together. From what I remember they aren't too pricey and I know for a fact you can get a pair in Brazil. This is what I'm referring to. http://www.drivingcomfort.com/travel-with-kids/microfiber-memory-foam-seatbelt-pad.cfm Best of luck and I hope you ...


6

There are any number of ways to do this, but perhaps the simplest is to use something similar to this belt mounting clip and have one of your rucksack straps fed through the belt loops: I would suggest mounting it either on the back of your pack, and allowing the camera to hang lens down, or on the top if you have a pack wide enough to avoid it hitting ...


6

Back length The first one to get right is the back length; loosen everything off (so you can wear it but nothing is tight) and put the pack on and see how it sits. You want the waist straps to sit just above your hips. If they don't adjust the back length (up or down). Once this is set don't alter it. The other straps will likely alter depending on your ...


5

Chafing occurs when skin rubs against something whether other skin, clothing, or gear. Staying clean, dry, and reducing friction are the ways to prevent any kind of chafing. As Ben said above that your hip belt may need be used the way it should be. I struggled with heavy packs, so I started following a way to adjust my pack this way: Loosen all the ...


5

Personally I have not found backpacks to be very high-maintenance. After a trip I completely empty my pack, shake it out, and wipe off the dust with a damp cloth. If there's sap or other problems I'd try spot cleaning them with mild detergent, but so far I've been lucky. One thing I'm careful to do (with tents and other gear as well as packs) is to prop ...


4

This is the response I gave to a similar question ....This is designed to slightly pull your shoulders back and evenly distribute the weight across your back (i.e. so that the weight doesn't simply sit on your lower back). Pull these tight so that you feel the weight move up slightly (to the middle of your back) and doesn't sit too low. You ...


4

This is the bag: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/high-sierra-whitewater-hydration-backpack-insulated-2l~p~1071h/ If you didn't know it was a hydration pack, the water bladder must have been removed. While the posts about "daypacks" are somewhat correct, most of the time when I see super-small backpacks, they are like yours - hydration packs that have ...


4

I think the answer is, it depends... :) Snowboard back protectors come in several guises, some better than others: Snowboard packs (with protectors) are similar. I would suggest that a protector (stand alone, not built into a pack) is going to offer much better protection than any back pack can offer. Main difference The main difference appears to ...


4

I ended ordering Condor 2 and find it pretty much perfect for my needs. And answers are : Pretty slim, about 5-8cm. But beware that the bag is so stiff and sturdy that this is not an easy task. It has a rubbery black bottom which grips better to surfaces and protects from moisture. A nice thing is that the bag always stays upright when I put it on the ...


3

Carabiners on the shoulder straps can add two bags of easy-access items. Just don't put more than several kilograms inside, the shoulder straps soft mesh could get damaged. Carabiners on the waist strap can comfortably fit sandals or other shoes. Get the lightest carabiners possible, for example this for bags and something larger, but still light, not ...


3

It's been a while since I posted this question, but I found an interesting alternative answer some time ago: Loosen your shoulder-straps such that the bottom edge of your backpack rests against your lower back (or butt in some cases I suppose) and the rest of the pack leans away from the rest of your back. Based on very limited fiddling around I did with ...


3

Look a the Peak Design Capture Camera Clip. It is designed to attach to the strap of a backpack or a belt. The clip screws on around your backpack strap, and a quick-release plate screws onto the tripod socket on your camera. Then that slides into the clip, and locks in place. So it should be easy to take the camera on or off while walking.


3

Such small bags are often known as daysacks. However, in my experience the best way to search for bags is by their size. Bag size is generally measured in L (even in the US I think). Most larger bags will have their size in the name. Some smaller bags don't, but is you can find the bag online it will generally have size information. Looking at this bag I ...


2

155cm quite short but not extremely so. I would be surprised if you can't get a decent fit with that sort of pack. To make sure you are fitting the pack correctly see this question or many other guides on the internet. From your description 3 sounds not too bad and pretty much how my pack is. 2 is the one you definitely want to avoid is straps digging into ...


2

Personally I would not want to mount a camera on a backpack. Sooner or later you're going to slip or bump into something and the camera is going to get hurt. Mounted on the backpack doesn't sound like it will be easily available. If you're not walking around ready to take a picture as the right situation arises, then put the camera in the pack. You say ...


1

I would recommend a soft open frameless pack, like a Duluth, which is made of canvas. We can fit three food barrels into our Duluth, but they are olive barrels (watertight) not the standard blue ones. I looked at the 115 L dry bags on the MEC site and it looks like your barrel might just squeeze into one, though paying for a drybag and then putting something ...


1

I've found a few different ways to do this. Each with it's own pros and cons. BlackRapid shoulder strap Toploader chest pouch CottonCarrier Vest CottonCarrier Strapshot Personally I go between the CottonCarrier vest which offers the fastest access and the Toploader chest pouch if I'm worried about the weather. Your camera just clips into the ...



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