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10

Here is the list of stuff I would consider taking on longer hikes: trail mix chocolate muesli bars more expensive energy bars are great for really demanding stuff, where energy to weight ratio really counts (e.g. multi pitch climbing). They are also more filling than muesli bars. beef jerky dried sausage vacuum-packed hard cheese peanut butter or nutella ...


9

One option, if you still want hot food with no real possibility for starting a fire, would be MREs (Meals Ready to Eat). These include a Flameless Ration Heater that rely on a contained chemical reaction to warm food. They are a bit on the bulky side though. Personally, for my lunches while backpacking I like Ready to Eat Tuna Salad Pouches along with some ...


3

Skirt. If you care a lot about wind and sand, then you should look for a tent with a skirt - many moutaneering-specific tents do have one. But skirt does increase the weight, so there's no right decision. I'd suppose a tent, that has a very small gap between a... uh, upper part, and a ground. Then you can just put some snow or sand there, to close the gap ...


2

Personally, I think that most decent backpacking tents will be fine for Iceland. The temperature is not extremely cold and you should be fine as long as you have a semi-decent sleeping bag. One thing I would recommend is getting a tent that can be self supporting (i.e. doesn't need pegging out to stand up) this can be very useful if you have to camp on ...


2

There are two types of bear bags. The first is similar to a bear canister but made out of strong cloth (often kevlar) and wire mesh with a metal insert to prevent crushing. The brand I am most familiar with is URSack, although there are probably others of equal quality. These bear bags are slightly lighter than bear canisters. These bear bags can often be ...


1

The factor of 5 maybe an exaggeration, but the physics is certainly worth examining. Consider what is happening as you walk. Backpack Take easy ground to begin with - your pack moves at a fairly constant speed and velocity - essentially the only energy needed from you is holding the weight in the air. On rough ground, experienced backpackers will keep ...


1

Traditionally a bear bag was simply something to hold your food out of reach of bears. This usually meant finding a way to suspend it from a high branch, and in this instance it's usually sufficient for the bag to be waterproof. (With this in mind, some people like to hang the bags "upside down" to prevent rain getting in through the top. Be sure to tie ...


1

This topic is very near & dear to me, as I've made a "Life-Science" out of getting along in the "Out-Of-Doors" without having to carry along a ton of "victuals & viands;" tuck, or tucker; or good old "Food!" Every culture has a different name for trail-grub (and some eat real "grubs" on the trail---the First Australians!) and it's gone through a huge ...


1

I think that Klara pretty much nailed it. I've been stoveless for a bit now, and I haven't found any hidden gems that people aren't aware of. What I do find is that on longer treks where the food becomes monotonous it pays to buy the best artisan products available, as they are usually a lot tastier than the mass produced stuff. On longer trips a lot ...


1

There are such things as compact, or mini rolls of duct tape, I've got a couple that came with my small, one or two person survival first aid kits: You could make a small roll yourself, just fold the end of a regular roll of tape over itself by a couple inches, then start rolling it up as you take it off the big roll.


1

I used to use a pencil, as apparently many others do. The eraser deteriorates and the graphite in time too. I would be reluctant to use a trekking pole as I suspect UV would deteriorate the tape. I hit this site for a better idea than the pencil and while not finding one here, I just hit on the idea of using a plastic card (like a free and non-identifiable ...



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