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11

There are differing schools of thought on this: Rolling/folding is a lot easier to manage in my opinion, easier to keep track of all the pieces, and when camping in dirty/snowy/wet environments makes it easier to keep the ground side of the tent together and the clean(ish) parts away from it. Stuffing results in fewer creases in the fabric over extended ...


11

I think you already answered your own question. Most dedicated GPS devices are more rugged, have better battery life, and don't require a data connection to work well. A phone has a lot of power overhead and is fragile. There are a few possible advantages to a phone. If you're already going to be carrying one, it reduces the total weight required. It's ...


10

I'm very satisfied with my Goalzero Nomad 7, it's small, easy to strap to your backpack, and it fully charges your batteries or anything that charges from USB or even 12V power in as little as 3hrs in good sunlight. There are lots of solar panels to choose from, any one will probably do the job, so shop for one that suits you. What you really need in your ...


9

Some back-of-the-envelope calculations: 12 volts * 4 amps = 48 watts * 8 hours = 384 watt-hours. That's the minimum battery capacity you'll need to power this for a night. The Goal Zero Sherpa 50 you propose to use will power it for about an hour, give or take efficiency losses. To power the blanket for the night, you're looking for something more along ...


9

I recently had this problem with a pack and have experimented by sewing on a layer of velour. It's much softer and padded. However it is also VERY warm, which may defeat the purpose of going shirtless.


9

When I cook home-dehydrated food, I often rehydrate for a day - but not on the stove. In the morning, I boil water for coffee, pour some over dehydrated meat in a Nalgene, leave the lid on loosely until the water is only warm, then tighten the lid firmly. It spends the day in the pack and by dinner time the meat is rehydrated. For some vegetables, such as ...


9

I think you have the right idea. Leave No Trace principles (and wilderness permit regulations in many areas) dictate that washing be done at least 100 feet from camp, trail, or stream. If there's some soil nearby that would be the best spot, because there'll be higher activity from decomposing organisms there which will break down any tiny bits of food you ...


9

I'm not sure if there is something you know about temperature's affect on books that I do not? I would not have thought temperature would be a problem. That aside, i think the ziplock solution is pretty good. It obviously doesn't provide any rigid support, but if you aren't concerned about that, there are a myriad of dry bags / pouches, map cases & ...


9

It might sound a bit odd and not-so-related to the question, but have you considered carrying a Kindle? I got used to carry mine along, wherever I go (bagpacking included). Advantages it doesn't get bent corners and broken spine; if you pack it in a good place, it doesn't break at all a fully charged battery lasts several weeks it is quite lightweight ...


8

Looking at the photo, if the ground is as soft as that, burying the canister by 2-3 cm could help a lot. If you're camping at a beach and bury it halfway in the sand, then that should even work in high winds. Apart from that, if you're willing to buy a new stove, there are a number of them that come with built-in legs, such as this one


8

The standard expedition stove for extreme conditions would be an MSR XGK. You will likely want to bring a pair of them, along with a repair kit, on the assumption that due to the cold or poor quality fuel you'll break a pump or need to make other repairs. Now, you may be thinking "what are all those people doing with canister stoves on ...


8

You'd be better of strength training your muscles to carry the extra weight of the water you need to carry. How much water an individual needs to stay hydrated is not a standard measure. Different individuals need more or less water to keep their bodies properly hydrated. I don't think it's necessarily wise to try and train your body to do with less of ...


8

If you are in a place that has streams, placing the beer in the water every time you take a break will cool them. Place in a cold/cool body of water about 30 minutes before drinking will also help. If you don't have a body of water, wrap the individual cans/bottles in a wet towel in the shade, preferable where it is windy. Evaporation will cool the beers. ...


8

There is the same discussion with paragliders getting porose due to packing methods. And there has been a lot of literature to that topic (a paraglider costs 3.000 USD after all), with a simple conclusion: As nhinkle mentioned, the different methods result in different stress to the fabric. Usually your tent will get damaged due to constant stress on the ...


8

Most GPS receivers in phones work not nearly as good as stand-alone GPS devices. Usually, one wouldn't notice this because phones use assisted GPS where they get the orbital data and/or almanac of the GPS satellites as well as the exact time from the GSM network. Also, they have a average position of the device. Without that data, phones are very slow ...


7

Chafing occurs when skin rubs against something whether other skin, clothing, or gear. Staying clean, dry, and reducing friction are the ways to prevent any kind of chafing. As Ben said above that your hip belt may need be used the way it should be. I struggled with heavy packs, so I started following a way to adjust my pack this way: Loosen all the ...


7

Firstly if you are on your own a four man tent is probably excessive. People buy small two man/trekking tents so that it is easy to carry them and one doesn't have this sort of problem. If you are in a larger group then it is not necessary for one person to carry the entire tent. You can break it up into at least poles, fly and inner. Different people can ...


7

The terms to google on seem to be "turbidity," "total suspended solids," and "total dissolved solids." TSS refers to solids that can be eliminated by a filter, and TDS to solids that are in particles so small that they get through a filter. High TSS seems to be harmful to fish because it indirectly reduces the amount of oxygen: ...


7

Titanium cookware, combined with a small gas stove, is very common in backpacking. If you look at camp cookware from Backcountry, REI, and other outdoor gear vendors you'll see a lot of titanium. It's sturdy, light-weight, not too terribly expensive, and has good heat transfer properties. If you're looking for something even cheaper, aluminum is another ...


7

In most places without extremely human habituated bears, a simple hang with the line tossed over a sturdy, isolated branch and tied off to an adjacent tree trunk is suitable. The bag should end up being roughly 12 feet above the ground, 5 feet away from the trunk and 5 feet below the branch. The PCT hang is a clever variation of this which eliminates the ...


7

What precautions should you take when going on a backpacking trip around the length of one week? Build a rough route card, where you plan to be and when. Give it to someone you trust who will keep track of you. That way if you get into serious trouble and can't get help yourself there will be someone to raise the alarm. Better than lying in a ditch ...


6

If it seems unstable as in wobbly then you might get better results by clearing out the ground you place it on so you have a level surface to work with (or by building a level surface with rocks or what you can find) Another option is to get legs that attach to the underside of the bottle to make the setup more stable. Here is an example from ebay, but ...


6

You shouldn't leave your sleeping bag compressed any longer than you need to. Store it out of it's bag on a shelf, hanging up, or in a large breathable storage bag. Only stuff it into it's stuff sack or a compression bag when you're packing it. If you store it compressed it will lose loft, which is what gives you insulation. How quickly it loses loft varies ...


6

Having suffered similar on a marathon I had to run in freezing rain once (ending up with not just large areas with the skin chafed off entirely, but also deep cuts into my thigh muscles from the stitching!) I can heartily recommend combining very supportive underwear with non-slip, stretch leggings. This way the only rubbing will be between the underwear ...


5

It depends a lot on the terrain. I wear a pedometer throughout the week (health program for work), and I use a GPS when hiking. From experience - on level terrain - I know that I get between 2100 and 2200 steps per mile. I walk between work and the coffee shop (a round trip of about 1.25 miles) each day, and this is fairly consistent. If you calibrate ...


5

The main advantage of anti-shock poles is that they tend to be less jolting on joints (like elbows and wrists) when used on firm ground or rocky terrain. On softer ground, where the dirt, sand or snow provides natural impact absorption, they can sometimes feel "mushy", and most people would find the benefits negligible. For this reason (and also to prevent ...


5

I'd need to know a bit more about your winter hiking conditions and duration. If you're erring on the side of active, I'd suggest a Labrador. If you're doing colder and shorter, something like a Bernesse Mountain Dog would do amazing. I love running with my Labrador since she can handle heat decently (I don't run with her when it's very hot), she's handle ...


5

I would say it's not a question of too cold, tents don't add that much warmth. Tarps and a shovel can make some very nice shelters in the snow. The real limitation is blowing snow/rain and the wind speed you expect to stand. If the wind is shifting at all, or is much above 20 mph, a tarp is going to be fairly miserable. ( I'm not including floorless tents ...


5

You don't mention any first-aid or survival items. I would include a first aid kit with maybe a compass and signaling mirror, maybe a firestarter of some kind. I would think that would add a negligible amount of weight to your rig.


5

While the answers above mainly focus on getting a Easy-To-Carry (new) instrument, I'll stick to an attempt of answering how can one carry a standard guitar like the one I have (a Pluto, acoustic). EDIT: As the question was having an edit about travelling guitars, I am afraid I have no experience with them, but I'd rather think that same packing technique ...



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