Hot answers tagged

27

You're bringing all the right things... (the only thing I would question is why a flashlight as well as a headlamp? - though if it's just a small flashlight, no big deal- I sometimes bring a spare headlamp). 20kg's is 44 pounds and 30-40lbs is about right for a 3 day trip alone. The only way to get the weight down is by bringing lighter (i.e. more expensive)...


26

Don't get wet! No I'm not being facetious, I hike through the rain forests of BC all the time, I've spent days in a row in solid rain while backpacking and setting up camp. Getting wet up here can mean death overnight even in the middle of summer, doesn't matter how hot it gets during the day, temperatures can drop to near zero overnight, if you're wet when ...


23

Trying to cut pack weight is all about leaving "extra" things out and then replacing needed things with light versions. Some things that jump out at me as "extra": Tent for 2 people If there is only one of you, why do you need a 2 person tent. For only 2 or 3 days, I would go with a tarp which will be lighter 2 pairs of underwear and socks A ...


22

The ideal weight is zero. The less weight you carry the more you will enjoy your outing. That being said, one should try to minimize their weight within reason. There exist different schools (Ultralight, super-ultralight, etc.) on what one should carry and how much it should weight. REI suggest the following categories: minimalist - Under 12 pounds ...


19

Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). It's naturally occurring, and to get a level of toxicity to animals you would need to get to 450mg per liter. Unless you're operating a mine or using literally tons of the stuff, it's quite safe and you'll never get near that. From a 2008 USGS study: Chronic toxicity was observed at concentrations that ranged from 450 ...


18

The general rule of thumb is to carry no more than a third of your body weight. That should be your max, so the answer is to carry less than that. Make your bag as light as you can. Aside from that it largely depends on your level of strength and fitness, and what you feel comfortable carrying. I tend to carry a heavier bag than most people I hike with, but ...


17

What precautions should you take when going on a backpacking trip around the length of one week? Build a rough route card, where you plan to be and when. Give it to someone you trust who will keep track of you. That way if you get into serious trouble and can't get help yourself there will be someone to raise the alarm. Better than lying in a ditch with ...


17

Even for "multi-week" trips, brushing with water alone is not going to compromise your tooth health. The abrasive action of the brush does most of the work, and missing the flouride hit for a few days won't affect your teeth in the least. Plus, it saves weight. So, the best LNT option: don't use it. If you MUST use toothpaste (or an alternative), try a few ...


14

The factor of 5 maybe an exaggeration, but the physics is certainly worth examining. Consider what is happening as you walk. Backpack Take easy ground to begin with - your pack moves at a fairly constant speed and velocity - essentially the only energy needed from you is holding the weight in the air. On rough ground, experienced backpackers will keep ...


13

Do you have 2 split rings (keyrings) with you? If so, here's how to make a buckle like that (or rather its D-ring predecessor): Attach both split rings to the upper strap, where the old buckle is/was. Pass the lower strap up through both split rings and back through the first. Here's an ASCII-art sketch before you pull it tight: ----- | //| ...


12

The answer to "is it too much" is extremely subjective. Is this strictly too much? No. Are there some things you can trim back if you want? Yes. I like to hike light, but not ultralight and this would be far too much weight for me to consider now but is almost exactly where I started out. Over time my base weight (without food and water) has ...


11

I usually don't carry any kind of stove with me when I go hunting - this could be anytime from September to November or in May and early June. The weather can vary wildly during these times and I've experienced every kind of weather, from 10 below (F) and snow, to 30 degrees and freezing rain, to 90 (F) and dry. I found that going without hot food for up ...


11

These bags are called stuff sacks, dry sack or compression sack. Often a smaller stuff stack containing the odds and ends is called a ditty bag. You can buy them at any backpacking outfitter. Some backpacking gear such as a tent or sleeping bags will often come with an included stuff sack. Compression bags are use to reduce the volume of some items such as ...


11

Depending on how much you need you can get a variety of food grade plastic bottles for carrying liquids. To avoid drips probably the best option is a squeeze type bottle with both a nozzle and a screw top lid. The combination of a screw top and insert squirt nozzle gives a good combination of ease of refilling, seal security and ease of use with minimal ...


10

TL;DR: Bring a set of clothes that are comfy-when-wet and expect to spend a lot of time in them. Keep a set of dry clothes for in-the-tent-only use. Don't ever let your wet clothes come into contact with your dry clothes, cause now you have a whole lot of damp clothes. I've done a lot of 3-week canoe trips and 3+ day winter hikes at -30 C (-22 F) ...


10

Here is the list of stuff I would consider taking on longer hikes: trail mix chocolate muesli bars more expensive energy bars are great for really demanding stuff, where energy to weight ratio really counts (e.g. multi pitch climbing). They are also more filling than muesli bars. beef jerky dried sausage vacuum-packed hard cheese peanut butter or nutella ...


10

I go to my local pharmacy and ask for medicine-grade screw-top bottles. These have good seals and only cost pennies. To be doubly sure I place the bottle in a plastic bag and carry it in an outside pocket of my pack. All this may seem a bit paranoid, but I once had a nasty experience with butter on my sleeping bag...


10

Some years ago I had the same problem. But, while shopping at my grocery store I looked at the olive oil options. Several came in small plastic bottles (maybe 3 oz), and since they were 'real' olive oil bottles had the funky no-drip top. After using up the original oil I've just refilled as necessary. Look around at your local supermarket.


9

My two concerns for trekking in wet weather are safety and comfort. The safety issue here is primarily hypothermia, which can be a real risk even in the upper 40s or lower 50s (F), if you're wet enough and out for a long period. Definitely something to be aware of. But even if you're warm enough to be safe, being soaking wet for a week just plain sucks- you'...


9

A rolled up sleeping pad is generally pretty lightweight, meaning the "you could misbalance your pack and strain your back" concern is probably one you can ignore. People try not put them inside because they may not fit, or they may get squashed. If the pads are waterproof, which is common, you really don't need to worry about the pad getting wet from ...


9

I think having it vertically using side compression straps or bungees on the rear of the bag effects movement the least (ie not getting caught on stuff). As Kate Gregory mentions the pads are really light and don't affect the balance of the bag too much so I wouldn't worry about that. foam pads like the one you have are also really tough! Unlike an ...


9

One option, if you still want hot food with no real possibility for starting a fire, would be MREs (Meals Ready to Eat). These include a Flameless Ration Heater that rely on a contained chemical reaction to warm food. They are a bit on the bulky side though. Personally, for my lunches while backpacking I like Ready to Eat Tuna Salad Pouches along with some ...


9

Traditionally a bear bag was simply something to hold your food out of reach of bears. This usually meant finding a way to suspend it from a high branch, and in this instance it's usually sufficient for the bag to be waterproof. (With this in mind, some people like to hang the bags "upside down" to prevent rain getting in through the top. Be sure to tie ...


9

The only answer is to go to a store and try on the sack for real. Take your actual gear to try with it, and use your normal packing technique. Try to choose a store with a trained fitter. Then take it home on appro and try it around the house for a few hours so you can return it if it doesn't carry well for you. It's worth the effort - a badly fitting pack ...


9

For the most part, your list looks reasonable for traditional (ie. non-ultralight) backpacking. The most important thing now is to get the pack fitted and balanced properly, and then get used to moving around while carrying the weight. 20kg hanging off your back will change your balance, so you need to get used to it. A few things to look at: Sleeping ...


8

I use a pac safe metal mesh for my plane travel as my pack is a camping pack not a travel pack with lockable pockets. http://www.blessthisstuff.com/stuff/wear/bags-luggage/bag-protector-by-pacsafe/ With a simple padlock and the length of cable you should be able to link it to a tree and put the key in your pocket or around your neck.


8

For cooking at cold and altitude, the pressurised liquid fuel stove is your friend. They're expensive and need some skill and care in use (practise before you take them into challenging situations), but they will perform much better than alcohol or canister stoves when the going gets tough. Here's a video that gives a good overview of how they are used. As ...


8

Titanium cookware, combined with a small gas stove, is very common in backpacking. If you look at camp cookware from Backcountry, REI, and other outdoor gear vendors you'll see a lot of titanium. It's sturdy, light-weight, not too terribly expensive, and has good heat transfer properties. If you're looking for something even cheaper, aluminum is another ...


8

It boils down to the point what one could really do in such a situation. When I trek in India, I do come across such situations that beg some action from me and other sensitive people around. I define scope of 'what can I do' as following: Don't be outnumbered!: If we are outnumbered, I will rather opt to report it to the authority, without threatening the ...


8

It's a novel idea, but it's not going to work in any practical sense. Most of those foams take about 15 minutes to setup, and you'll have to come up with some way to fabricate a mold while you spray it. It will be about an hour before you could safely enter your foam sarcophagus, and if this is to be used in an emergency situation, that's probably not time ...



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