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1

Having done tonnes of research in this area, I settled for products from a company called Portapow. They do an 11w panel which I combined with their 6000mah solar battery and a AA/ AAA battery charger. With this set up I can charge my phone from either the solar panel, battery pack or solar battery. I can charge batteries for my GPS. The 11w panel charges my ...


2

I use two cheap solar panels (A5-paper size, folding ones) on bike trips, one without a battery and one with. I have both installed on my bike all day, with my GPS device plugged in to one of them all the time. I travel on roads and in a particular direction, so I can adjust them every two hours or so to face the sun. This keeps the battery on a respectable ...


9

I'm very satisfied with my Goalzero Nomad 7, it's small, easy to strap to your backpack, and it fully charges your batteries or anything that charges from USB or even 12V power in as little as 3hrs in good sunlight. There are lots of solar panels to choose from, any one will probably do the job, so shop for one that suits you. What you really need in your ...


3

I suffered from chaffing for years and tried a whole range of options. What I found that worked best is the Under Armour Original Boxer Jocks, the 9" version. They cover most of the thigh and holds well enough to keep everything separated to avoid the chaffing. I get them from USA when they go on sale, but Wiggle, SportShoes and others stock them. If a ...


2

As a runner, I use Body Glide to prevent chafing. It works like a charm. Even if I put it on early (say, before driving to a race) it stays well enough to protect me. It is a little on the pricey side, and I've read that you can get the same effect from Aquaphor, so you may want to experiment.


6

Having suffered similar on a marathon I had to run in freezing rain once (ending up with not just large areas with the skin chafed off entirely, but also deep cuts into my thigh muscles from the stitching!) I can heartily recommend combining very supportive underwear with non-slip, stretch leggings. This way the only rubbing will be between the underwear ...


7

If you are in a place that has streams, placing the beer in the water every time you take a break will cool them. Place in a cold/cool body of water about 30 minutes before drinking will also help. If you don't have a body of water, wrap the individual cans/bottles in a wet towel in the shade, preferable where it is windy. Evaporation will cool the beers. ...


3

I can think of many reasons why solo-backpacking wouldn't be advisable, but cougars isn't one of them. I'm not saying cougar attacks don't happen, last summer there was a incident in Waterton National Park close to home here, a cougar was menacing hikers along a popular trail, and even attacked a teenage girl that was part of a group. Cougar attacks are ...


3

The precautions are exaggerated. These animals are extremely reclusive. Adult humans are outside their prey schema and will be avoided except in extremely unusual circumstances. From Wikipedia: Fatal cougar attacks are extremely rare and occur much less frequently than fatal dog attacks, fatal snake bites, fatal lightning strikes, or fatal bee stings. ...


0

Consider using freezer-bag cooking. You boil your water in a pot, then pour it into a freezer bag with your food to cook. Advantages: No dishes to wash. Zero environmental impact. Makes it easier to avoid backpackers' diarrhea, which the evidence shows comes not from contaminated water but from hand-to-mouth contamination from your hiking partners.


3

Following strict leave no trace principles, you're already doing a pretty good job. Where you can improve is to use no soap, small amounts of biodegradable soap are acceptable, but you can clean you dishes with just hot water. When you're done scrubbing, it's best to strain your scraps out of the water and pack them out with the rest of your garbage, then ...


9

I think you have the right idea. Leave No Trace principles (and wilderness permit regulations in many areas) dictate that washing be done at least 100 feet from camp, trail, or stream. If there's some soil nearby that would be the best spot, because there'll be higher activity from decomposing organisms there which will break down any tiny bits of food you ...


2

If it has a wick in the priming pan it is most likely an international. The other main difference is the fuel tube on the international is slightly larger diameter. Although, this would be hard to tell without a comparison. However, as I commented to ShemSeger's answer there is a different diameter nozzle for kerosene. Therefore if you don't have this ...


1

I happen to have both stoves that you're talking about. They look pretty much identical, but you're right that the wick is in the international stove, the whitegas-only stove does not have the wick. The international stove also has a brass sleeve over the coil of pipe that directs the liquid fuel through the element where it's vapourised, the whitegas-only ...



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