Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

There are animals out there capable of figuring out how to get into your cache, Wolverines (a cousin of the racoon) are notorious for cracking into even the most cleverly hung food caches, but you don't really have to worry about them if you're only hanging your food for one night. Animals are more ambitious when they know their reward is food, but mere ...


2

I've backpacked in places that have raccoons but I've never had a problem with them. Squirrels and a number of birds can also chew/peck their way through a bag to get at your food. I don't know what kind of birds you have in Michigan, but here in Idaho, Clark's Nutcrackers and magpies can be a nuisance. A mesh bag will probably allow them access to your ...


1

Unfortunately this advice may a bit late for you now, but if you cover the outside of the pots in washing-up liquid before putting them on the fire/wood burner and clean it after use. The washing-up liquid should stop the soot sticking and it should wipe of fairly easily. This approach is best if you are at a fixed campsite where you can easily wash your ...


3

This addresses the perfect solution for silnylon. http://jwbasecamp.com/Articles/Silnylon1/index.html Or if you are wanting to continue with instruction that specifically discuss PU coatings there is this: http://dzjow.com/2012/06/18/how-to-re-coat-a-shelter/ The processes are identical, one just cites one specific kind of material while the other offers ...


1

If you want to get a similar feeling at a lower elevation, there is one simple solution: head north (colder) or head west (more snow — shorter growing season). The treeline in Yosemite National Park is at 3,200 – 3,600 metre. The treeline in Jasper National Park is at 2,400 metre. The treeline in the Olympic Mountains is at 1,500 metre. The treeline in ...


0

If you're using a campfire, some foods, like fresh-caught fish, don't require cookware. Just wrap in aluminum foil and cook in the coals. Fish or biscuits can even be cooked directly on the coals: scoop some ashes over the coals so they're not TOO hot, then place the food directly on the ashes. After it's cooked, just brush off the ashes. You should ...


0

Last week, I backpacked into Idaho's White Cloud Mountains. I boiled a few eggs the night before and placed them in the refrigerator. On the morning we left, I took them out and rolled them up in a t-shirt and tucked them under a jacket in my pack. They were still very cold the next morning and cold enough on the second morning. Daytime temperatures were ...


2

These boots seem perfectly reasonable to me. If they are comfortable and not about to fall apart I can't see why they should be a problem. I suspect what they mean is that the are not familiar/do not stock that brand of boot so can't recommend it. It would seem crazy to me if they said you can't use perfectly good boots because they aren't on some list. ...


3

I haven't seen any particular rules for boots at Philmont. I am aware of a wide range of footwear having been used, ranging from the traditional heavy high-topped boots to lightweight, low-cut trail runners. In general it seems the Philmont trails are well-maintained, and with the exceptions of places like Valle Vidal (off-trail) and Mt. Baldy (plenty of ...


1

One suggestion, which you will need to try by experiment - dry ice on the bottom of a Thermos. Pack some layers of insulation on top of the dry ice, and put the item on top, with a thermometer so you can keep an eye on temperatures. Adjust the insulation to get the temperature sitting where you want it. The thermometer can be checked though the trip and ...


1

Once you've decided which users you are testing for, you need to assemble loads that represent the kinds of gear they are likely to carry. This may differ considerably from what you carry on a trip. Luckily, I own a lot of different sleeping bags, tents, stoves, pads, different reservoirs and bottles, filters, etc, so it's pretty easy for me to assemble gear ...


7

In most places without extremely human habituated bears, a simple hang with the line tossed over a sturdy, isolated branch and tied off to an adjacent tree trunk is suitable. The bag should end up being roughly 12 feet above the ground, 5 feet away from the trunk and 5 feet below the branch. The PCT hang is a clever variation of this which eliminates the ...


2

I have always used my backpack as part of my sleep system. All food stuffs are double wrapped,in the center of the pack,then the pack is placed at the head of the sleeping bag,with a fleece placed over it. If you are worried about vermin getting at it,in the past I have been known to cover it with a rain hood and suspend it from a tree,using a rope thrown ...


1

Buy yourself a light-weight wok. They are superb. You can cook anything any how you like in them. I have been camping-travelling for decades, and yes, the trangia IS good. But a wok is surprisingly better. I was fortunate to find a 10 inch, double handed wok in japan when I was travelling with the trangia. I was replacing the trangia's pans with the wok. I ...


1

A buddy of mine has an ultralight set made by a Swedish maker called Trangia. It weights 330 grams for the burner, windshield, a 800 ml pan and a frypan. It works with a spirit burner, so you don't have to carry a large gas canister. The whole thing has 15 cm of diameter and about 6 cm of height. All pieces fit inside of the 800 ml pot an the frypan (which ...


1

I cook almost everything in a titanium pot, by boiling water and rehydrating dehydrated meals, whether they be prepackaged backpacking meals from a variety of sources (including Mountain House, Packit Gourmet, Packlite Foods, or the many other options out there), meals sold in dehydrated form at grocery stores but not necessarily intended exclusively for ...


3

I'm not sure what "graniteware" is, but it doesn't sound lightweight! What you want is: light compact durable Something from the REI Cooksets page would probably be appropriate. There are a variety of styles and sizes there. For one person on a 4-day hike you won't need much.


7

Titanium cookware, combined with a small gas stove, is very common in backpacking. If you look at camp cookware from Backcountry, REI, and other outdoor gear vendors you'll see a lot of titanium. It's sturdy, light-weight, not too terribly expensive, and has good heat transfer properties. If you're looking for something even cheaper, aluminum is another ...


0

A rope and pulley will keep bears from getting to it and if it is on the ground then it is a target for critters. And then so are you.


1

In addition to ssduplantis's mention to Tenkara, I would like to write that some fly rods are very portable. Some manufacturers make rods consisting of up to 7 pieces, which fit into a 40cm canister that is very portable. One example is the Orvis frequent flyer series. That, a fly reel, a box of flies, and a leader would not take much more space than a ...


1

This youtube video offers another option that I have found useful: Managing excess webbing straps on backpacks etc. I purchased what is called in the US "Velcro One Wrap" at a fabric store, around $5 for a 3/4" x 4' roll. Much more than I needed for one backpack, over half is left over.


2

Many areas in Scotland can be quite quiet, especially outside the peak season. There are also many long distance walks ranging from the well known to the less so. I've heard the Rob Roy way and the Cape Wrath trail are quiet good although I've actually done neither. There is no system of manned mountain huts like in many places but many unmanned bothies ...



Top 50 recent answers are included