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1

The problem you've got is that most of the larger brands are batch manufacturing in China or Vietnam. They bring the product over complete and don't hold spares of items such as flys and inners. If you're looking for something lightweight, I think your best bet would be to use one of the established cottage manufacturers like Tarptent, Mountain Laurel ...


1

I like to eat Knorr Spaghetteria. I don't know if it's the most efficient energy-wise, but it's vastly more efficient than outdoor store dehydrated meals price-wise! At Amazon they sell at €1.45 per package. A package is advertised to be a meal for two, but it isn't — it is a meal for one. But €1.45 per meal is not bad at all. I used to bring peanut ...


1

A lot of this is going to be subjective, but here is what I avoid: Anything with sugar alcohols. The only exception being stevia/erythritol. Everything else causes gastric distress, at least for me. So watch out for sports bars and powders that contain things like sorbitol, xylitol, or malitol. Dried fruits with too much fiber. Usually prunes or dried ...


2

In my experience, this is just an all-around difficult situation. Your clothes/boots getting soaked is inevitable. Even with gaiters and the most advanced moisture wicking technology, hike a day in the snow and you'll be really wet. Here's why: even if you're avoiding post-holing with snow shoes, the act of hiking in snow will raise your heart rate and get ...


8

When you start packing lighter, usually it comes with smaller margins of error. It seems that it is typically your case here. Basically, the first thing is to be more careful. It is a habit to take. For example, when you couldn't find information about whether there was deep wet snow or not, the decision of not taking the snowshoes was maybe arguable. ...


3

I would highly recommend a menstrual cup. That's what I use while camping and hiking as they're light easy to carry and generate little-to-no trash. You can simply pour out and bury the blood rather than packing out a load of dirty tampons. However keep in mind that there is a learning curve associated with each type of cup, and there are a LOT of ...


1

As others have mentioned there is a whole spectrum of fabric shelters. A few decades ago the difference was much more pronounced between a tent and a tarp. My first tent was a Vango Force 10 which my Dad had used before me and is built something along the lines of an air raid shelter in cotton canvas, rubber and aluminium. It is extremely rugged and still ...


9

The only answer is to go to a store and try on the sack for real. Take your actual gear to try with it, and use your normal packing technique. Try to choose a store with a trained fitter. Then take it home on appro and try it around the house for a few hours so you can return it if it doesn't carry well for you. It's worth the effort - a badly fitting pack ...


7

Is there really such a clear dichotomy between open tarps and enclosed tents? The OP implies that open tarps offer a qualitatively different and superior experience to enclosed tents. My response would be: not for everyone, and not in all conditions. In reality there's a continuum from cowboy-camping through many types of tarp, to tarps combined with a ...


6

Some years ago I had the same problem. But, while shopping at my grocery store I looked at the olive oil options. Several came in small plastic bottles (maybe 3 oz), and since they were 'real' olive oil bottles had the funky no-drip top. After using up the original oil I've just refilled as necessary. Look around at your local supermarket.


1

The first option that comes to mind is a 20 ounce plastic soda bottle or something similar. Lightweight and well sealed, if you fill it only half full it's relatively easy to pour without spilling down the sides. There's also a product called the flexible flask that comes with a measuring spout that should prevent any spills, and then you could throw the ...


8

I go to my local pharmacy and ask for medicine-grade screw-top bottles. These have good seals and only cost pennies. To be doubly sure I place the bottle in a plastic bag and carry it in an outside pocket of my pack. All this may seem a bit paranoid, but I once had a nasty experience with butter on my sleeping bag...


8

Depending on how much you need you can get a variety of food grade plastic bottles for carrying liquids. To avoid drips probably the best option is a squeeze type bottle with both a nozzle and a screw top lid. The combination of a screw top and squirt nozzle gives a good combination of ease of refilling, seal security and ease of use with minimal dripping. ...


4

Regarding energy expense, there is already a good answer. However, I want to add that when considering "Does a pound on your foot equal 5 pounds on your back?" there are more factors at play than just energy expense. You should also consider the effect on knees and joints. As an example - If I put 5 lb weights on both my feet and went up and down stairs ...



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