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1

If you are unfamiliar with the Adirondacks (ADK), the term "High Peaks" is the most talked about area for backpacking in the Adirondacks. They are the 46 tallest peaks in New York. Jesse Black's link was great, its provided by the ADK tourism council. The "state government's authoritative" site is a terrible mess for the information you are looking for, but ...


2

Yes, I would highly recomend a footprint. There are a lot of pros. Your tentfloor lasts much longer because of friction from rocks. You dont break your floor that fast as without footprint. It's also a little bit warmer with a floor on rock. It's much cheaper to replace the footprint You can use a piece of plastic as footprint. In the snow it's really ...


1

Another two cents (experience: two Philmont expeditions). Do all you can at home to test things. Boots: if you've got a pack, test the boots and break them in with local hikes. This also lets you work out the 'fit' of the pack -- find that sweet spot where the hip belt takes the weight and the shoulders stabilize. Gradually add weight to the pack up to ...


6

Yes, if you are camping in rocks and snow, you will want a footprint. Since there don't appear to be any specifically made for this tent, I suggest making one out of Tyvek. It is readily available at most home supply stores here in the states (not sure on your location). Making the Tyvek match your tent dimensions perfectly is a touch of work. You'll ...


7

All the other answers are correct and good. Car-Camping If the problem is that you want a realistic test but either (a) do not have much time, or (b) wisely do not want to go out backpacking on a test trip alone, then do a car camping trip as a "dress rehearsal". Find a car-camping site.Preferably in the wild or woods, rather than a developed KOA-stlye ...


12

Most gear you can test out in your house. Take your boots out on any trail, each time you go out pack a little bit more in your pack and get used to the weight. Come up with a good clothing layer system. Make sure you can get your tent set up quickly. There is nothing like setting up in a downpour minutes before sundown. You can practice this inside. Make ...


3

There can't be any general rule on testing equipment but you should have tested at least all the features that you think you will need during your journey. You also do not necessarily have to test all your stuff at once. For "technical" equipment such as tents, stoves and the like, it might be enough to just learn their handling. Nothing is more annoying ...


12

To test your hiking kit/boots to see if it is all comfortable/fits you can do a day walk but carrying your full rucksack and kit (or stuff of similar weight). This will give you a idea of how your kit fits and the difference in hiking with a full rucksack compared to a daysack to help you judge how far you should aim for. Most of your camping kit can be ...


7

I would imagine the "testing" others referred to is suitability for purpose rather than will the gear end up damaged or broken. For example, if using a new tent, have you practiced pitching it at home first rather than waiting until you have to use it while in the middle of nowhere? Or is the stove and cooking equipment you plan to carry able to cope with ...


8

http://visitadirondacks.com/stay/campgrounds/backcountry-camping-rules-guidelines You only need a permit if your group is 10+ or you are staying in one location for more than 3 days. You don't need reservations for areas which allow primitive camping, but there are some campgrounds which require it. The Adirondacks are composed of a lot of areas with ...


1

I narrowed the choices down on a few factors: 1) I wanted to spend under $400 for the tent since my wife and I will only use it a handful of times a year. I don't mind buying a nice tent if it's an older model and purchased off season. Perhaps that's way my fashion sense is always a year behind? 2) I was willing to trade weight for a bit of comfort and ...


4

Tenting with two people always comes down to a few items. How easy is it to get in/out? Is there enough room to fit both people and gear? How much does this thing weigh? Can we afford it? You've ruled out the cost. Given that all three tents have two doors, getting in and out should be equivalent. So it comes down to balancing weight vs. space. The ...


3

I have successfully used mixtures of gasoline, diesel and kerosine in various portions and had no problems that couldn't be solved by swapping to the other jet. Use the suck it and see approach works fine without getting technical. If availability is an issue and it comes to hot dinner or raw dinner are you really going to be that picky which fuel you use, ...


4

These three tents are very similar; freestanding, double-wall dome construction. The limelight is a bit heavier with more floor space. The trail light does not have a transversal pole. Any of them should do just fine. I used a similar tent, the MSR Hubba Hubba, for a while and was quite satisfied with the design. I now retired the Hubba Hubba in preference ...


10

My other half used Tyvek when he was practicing Archery and one of the factors there was it had to be quiet, they used it for 4-6 hour stints to sit on. This is what he and some others in his club did: Wash it on a cotton / white cycle in your washing machine without any soap or detergent or powders. Wash it three times but let it dry thoroughly between ...


1

How about a center or cross cut to create "post-it" strips? If any of the resulting pieces are too heavy you could just peel off a few (cm)s of layer. --(-)-- The problem with buying pre-cut pieces is there is typically a mark-up in price.


3

Sleeping pads: I was on a motorcycle trip with very little storage space. I bought a couple of those inflatable pool mattresses at Walmart. The adult-sized, rectangular ones were cheaper than the tapered ones, and they re-folded nice. They also proved to be more durable than I expected. I only used one of the pads on my trip (5? nights). It made a few ...


5

What I do is wrap the duct tape around a pencil. I just wrap as much as I might need and since I also need/want to take a pencil it kills two birds with one stone. I've been doing this for years.


12

I know you said in your question that you don't want to bring a whole roll, but I've found that Duct Tape can be easily collapsable if you use a knife and cut out the cardboard inside of the roll. After that, take a strip of Duct Tape, fold it on itself and stick it to half of the inside roll. Flatten the roll and you have a rectangle of usefulness. (o) ...


4

I've always folded it on itself. One of my OCD things is getting other things sticky via the use of duct tape so I never wrap it around a bottle or pole, however I've seen plenty who do this with no trouble... Anyway, I prepare it by folding about quarter inch patches over each other (kind of like packing a tent that you fold instead of roll). I would not ...


5

You can buy much smaller rolls in most department stores or from the dollar store, sometimes they are the decorated kind instead of gray (check the boxing and tape section of the store) but the amount on the roll is much less than a standard massive home-improvement-store roll. With a smaller, lighter roll (or nearly used roll like someone suggested) you can ...


15

It is fairly common to store duct tape just below the handle of your trekking poles. This is my preferred way as it is always accessible. Some people prefer to wrap it around Nalgene bottles. An alternative you could also buy it in small square pieces instead of the typical roll. I usually place about 10 layers around each poles. I would not bring three ...


10

Duct tape wraps around items fairly and can be stored by wrapping on your gear. Nalgene (or similar) water bottles have a good shape for keeping the tape flat. I have wrapped tape around spare batteries, but the tape was wider than the batteries were long. Even so, to the tape was usable. The water bottles would also better in that you don't have to ...


4

The answer will vary widely for different types of solar panels. For example, some are not suitable for use while walking or can only charge via USB. General considerations Solar cells have the highest power the more vertical the sun rays hit them. Around 50° N the optimum is around 30-40° between solar panel and horizon, being flatter in summer and ...


1

The problem with raw eggs seems to be mainly that they dry out. As long as the shell is not cracked, no bacteria can get in Some recipes from old books: Cover the shell with vaseline. Put them in a glass with a 10% solution of sodium silicate. Keep in a container with slaked lime solution. The last two are said to preserve the eggs for many months. ...


2

Fresh Un-Refrigerated Egg Storage: On many wilderness excursions I've backpacked with store bought eggs (in crush-resistant container) for 7-10 days (or longer when coated with mineral oil) with no problem as long as the shell is intact. You can water-test the eggs - Sink’s is Good / floats it’s Bad. More info can be found here: ...


2

There are quite a number of options, although the 4000 foot requirement pretty much limits it to the White Mountains of NH, the northern Green Mountains of VT, and a few peaks in ME. It's not clear if you want to or need to do a out and back, or if you can spot a car and do a traverse. Here are just a few options that come to mind without looking things up ...


0

One possible route to see waterfalls in White Mountain National Forest: Hike in from the end of Zealand Road to Zealand Falls, then take the Ethan Pond Trail down to Thoreau Falls. Hike out the Ethan Pond Trail and you can get picked up by the AMC shuttle. http://www.outdoors.org/lodging/lodging-shuttle.cfm The drive back would take you through Crawford ...


2

Polar pure, the most effective water treatment product availble, is now back in stock and availble for sale on amazon.com I would like to thank everybody for all there support, it was an unfortunately long process due to the "meth heads" that were using iodine, the same chemical used in polar pure, to make crystal meth. This caused the dea to create much ...


3

I usually use trekking poles when walking and have been for over 20 years as it helps prevent knee injury so I would use them with a tarp. Since you want to use a dedicated pole for a tarp which is lightweight, you could have a look at this one http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/shelter-accessories/WA114.html from a UK website dedicated to lightweight gear. ...


8

I tend to find that although I plan to pack either horizontally or vertically it never ends up that way, though I've tried both in the past. I now tend to pack in a manner of: How likely am I going to need that item. Will using this item remove it from my pack (food) Will using this item lighten my pack afterwards (gas canister / water bottles) If I ...


1

Many ultra light tents which use trekking poles as part of the framing offer the alternative of using carbon fiber poles (1-2oz), carbon fiber and fiberglass (1.8oz), or aluminium (4oz). I used one carbon fiber pole over a long period of time for the awning of my LightHeart Solo tent (they only sell aluminium now). In one of my first outing with the carbon ...


7

I'm assuming you mean whether long and thin things should go in vertically or horizontally, or folded clothes go in horizontal or vertical layers. The advantage of packing vertically is that more of your stuff is easily accessible from the top of the rucksack. Packing horizontally means the things at the bottom are hard to get to. The disadvantage of ...



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