New answers tagged

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I would truly give the "meta-answer" to find out for yourself, by doing regular 1-day trips at the start. You will very quickly find out what works for you and what does not. Take whatever equipment you have and go on your merry way. Don't make the route very long, steep, technical or exposed at the beginning, stay on populated routes, and the worst thing ...


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This saying appears to be mostly common sense or "homespun" wisdom, but there are some studies that have tried to dig into it: This HowStuffWorks Adventure article mentions Hillary's ascent of Everest, as well as the Army study mentioned in another answer here. The general consensus is that yes, mass on the feet incurs more cost in energy to move than mass ...


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There are a couple of specific areas to look at : 1) Knowledge : you should make yourself aware of the basic skills that you need to travel safely in the wilderness. This includes things like basic survival skills and an understanding of the weather conditions and terrain that you will be travelling in. Before trips to an unfamiliar area you should also ...


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(Caveat: I don't drink while hiking) A group I hiked with once locally used a cooler tube. It appeared to keep everything chilled on a warm-ish day in the Southeastern U.S. There are quite a view vendors of similar products and it appeared to work well with a hiking setup for carrying.


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It is also worth mentioning that there are other ways to obtain absolute position references by using astronomical observations. Most of these are centuries old and of course, are not anywhere near as convenient and in most cases not as accurate a GPS however they do have the advantage that they don't depend on electronics or batteries to work. The modern ...


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On the East Coast at least, many bears are very savvy about finding ways to get your smelly yummy bear bag out of the trees. Even if a persistent bear fails to secure your food from the trees, his efforts to do so can cost you loss of sleep. I have personally had bears find shrewd ways of getting to my food bags twice on the Appalachian Trail. But that ...


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Fully domesticated black bears are all over the East Coast national parks and forests these days. To fully defeat tree climbing black Bears, the best bear bag for me has been a dry sack, one that is truly waterproof. Instead of tying it between trees, I weigh it down with big rocks underwater in the nearest water source. I tie the bag at ground level to a ...


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While the following won't absolutely prevent it, it will help: Set up a hand washing station in camp. The easiest one of these is a perforated ladle made from a pop bottle. Size the holes so that it runs water for 10-15 seconds. Provide a foam soap dispenser that has an anti-viral in it. Have a dedicated bucket. The station is set up on a tree near the ...


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Numbers: You are asking the right questions. From 30 years of running about 4 weeks of trips annually: About 1 trip in 5 we would have an 'epidemic' of upset stomach and loose bowels. Usually this was attributed to poor dish washing. Adding a hotwater/bleach cycle to the daily routine eliminated the problem within 2-3 days. "Cup borrowing" was a ...


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The best strategy is to probably hike an alternate hike. Instead of the traditional NOBO GAME route with a start date at the end of March, you could go SOBO, or do a flip flop, or start early or late. By avoiding the crowds, you reduce your risks. You can also avoid shelters and hostels. Good hygiene, plenty of rest, and a proper diet are also useful for ...


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Acquire it 6 months or less before your trip on the AT. There is some controversy but it seems you can probably count on immunity from an exposure to last 6+ months. Some of the best places to acquirer Norovirus (that are easily accessible) are daycare centers and nursing homes. Volunteering at one or more of these institutions, is win/win you get to ...


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TL;DR It's very difficult if not impossible. Norovirus is very, very contagious. It can be spread: close contact with someone with norovirus – they may breathe out small particles containing the virus that you could inhale touching contaminated surfaces or objects – the virus can survive outside the body for several days eating ...


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In the civilized world you wash your hands regularly, and food handlers should so and additionally wear gloves so if they carry any pathogen, it's not transmitted to the food. We don't have that luxury during outdoorsman activities such as hiking, but we do have two tools we can use to limit exposure. Carry and use hand sanitizer. Use it before and after ...


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Avoid foods that Are sticky or that leave a residue on fingers. It's hard enough to keep hygiene when backpacking. Require refrigeration. Maybe if you know it will be cold enough the whole time... but why Require being cooked through prior to eating (raw meats, etc). Cooking on long hikes is tricky enough and checking meat temp is difficult. Also ...



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