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0

Others have covered the basic knots here already. Rather than post more, I want to point out that you should know one or more knots for each basic use: Tying two pieces of line together requires a "bend". Three common bends are square (reef) knot, sheet bend, and fisherman's bend. Each has some advantages over the others, and these are important to ...


7

No, it's not going to be feasible: You'd need a lot of cans. To approximate the volume of a sleeping bag and thermal mat I'd say at least around 5-10 cans. For this weight/volume you can just as well bring a proper sleeping bag/tarp/bivvy. The spray foam is not stable in itself. It will form bubbly clouds of foam, so you'd need a mold. This is not easy, ...


8

It's a novel idea, but it's not going to work in any practical sense. Most of those foams take about 15 minutes to setup, and you'll have to come up with some way to fabricate a mold while you spray it. It will be about an hour before you could safely enter your foam sarcophagus, and if this is to be used in an emergency situation, that's probably not time ...


0

For breakfast I bring freezer-bag-cooking porridge with powdered Scottish oats and chocolate protein powder, mixed with nuts and honey. Each portion is in its own bag. You add warm water, stir, and you have your proteins served along with carbs. And it tastes great. Pros: easy to do once you have a bulk of the ingredients (I may point out to my source if ...


2

After years of experience doing short and long treks in various climates this is the first time I hear of a trekking umbrella. And honestly, I'm not convinced. Yes, rain protection will be good, breathability is excellent and they are easy to set up and take down when the weather changes (even without taking of the backpack). The single big problem I see ...


2

So trekking umbrellas are apparently a thing. And no one can really argue the claim that they are the most "breathable" form of raingear. There are a couple varieties, some are designed ultra compact to be lightweight and packable, and others are designed to be rigged to your backpack for handsfree trekking. U.L. Trekking Umbrella Swing-Hands Free: The ...


3

For part one, there are two aspects to consider: one is the regular old hit to the cardiovascular system that makes you tired more quickly because the air is thinner. This will affect you and your dog pretty much equally. However, many dogs will run until they are totally exhausted whenever there is adventure involved, so this aspect at worst it will just ...


0

Assuming that you have easy access to drinkable water and some time when cooking, lentils can be soaked in cold water for an hour or two to reduce the cooking time. Soaked, red lentils should easily be done in about 10 minutes and not take much more time than most sorts of pasta. I would also reconsider if hard cheese is too heavy. A ripe hard cheese can ...


-1

Protein powder. Add it to your food. Add it to water. Add it to hot-water+powdered milk.


0

The most efficient "food" you can carry is the body fat you can afford to lose. In our younger days, we went on 12 to 14 day backpacking trips, with a much more varied diet than suggested in the other answers. We took freeze-dried breakfasts and dinners, bread, cheese, butter, sliced ham, chocolate, nuts, dried fruit, frozen orange juice (one 6 oz can per ...


7

I do a lot of strength training when not backpacking, and try to keep my protein up around ~140 grams per day, on average. I asked a related question over on the fitness.stackexchange.com site, and at this point make all my own meals (usually with my dehydrator) because I find pre-made-hiker-food to be junk. The lightest protein source I know of is simply ...


7

It boils down to the point what one could really do in such a situation. When I trek in India, I do come across such situations that beg some action from me and other sensitive people around. I define scope of 'what can I do' as following: Don't be outnumbered!: If we are outnumbered, I will rather opt to report it to the authority, without threatening the ...


6

I don't understand why you're so centric around protein. There are protein bars, some of which contain over 20g of protein. There are also freeze dried meats which is actually more protein dense(higher protien-weight ratio) than protein bars. Freeze dried foods generally offer the best weight to calorie ratio, because they have almost no water weight. Even ...


3

On my treks I usually keep a trail journal. I only bring a pencil and some eraser (i.e. super light-weight), and use this to write about the journey, draw small maps/diagrams and sometimes even sketches of what I encounter. Get a routine I also force myself to write an entry on every single day, that way I'm ensured I won't end up forgetting about the thing ...


1

Some parks require you to have a bear canister. Here in the Rocky Mountains if you camp up in the mountains(no trees to sling a bag) you're usually required to have a canister, not because of bears but marmots. Bear canisters might be a little much, but its a sure fire way to prevent animals from getting in your food.Once I bought one, I've always used it ...


3

To carry raw eggs, leave 'em in their shells, put them in an old peanut-butter jar (plastic, watertight, wide mouthed). FILL the rest of the jar with water and close the lid. The water keeps the eggs from breaking, as long as there isn't any air space, and they will last at least a week in good weather. That's less than 90° greater than freezin'. This ...


3

I started out cooking actual meals, which was time consuming and required a lot of clean up. Its not practical to pack out waste from food prep cleanup(like waste water), and I started to realize it was not in good ethic to do so. So I started with the mentality boil don't cook. I've gone ahead and invested in a MSR WindBoiler(similar to the jetboil). This ...


4

Cooking or not, being able to heat water can be very useful in many cases. A basic alcohol stove, a little fuel, and a fireproof cup will weight less than 200g and fit all in the cup, so that's not much of a big deal. (All for less than 15$ for basic stuff). You'll get tea in the morning and you'll be able to boil water if needs be (sterilize water from a ...


11

I usually don't carry any kind of stove with me when I go hunting - this could be anytime from September to November or in May and early June. The weather can vary wildly during these times and I've experienced every kind of weather, from 10 below (F) and snow, to 30 degrees and freezing rain, to 90 (F) and dry. I found that going without hot food for up ...


3

Just considering weight: The great advantage is that you save weight by not carrying a stove and fuel, a pot, a Sierra cup and a largish spoon for stirring. The disadvantage is that you carry more weight than if you had taken freeze-dried or dehydrated food. That is, you have to carry the water content of all your food, which can add up, unless you subsist ...


3

Pros You don't need to carry a stove or fuel. The space and weight that would be spent on these can be devoted to other things, or eliminated altogether. You don't need to take the time to cook things. If there's any meal preparation involving rehydration, it generally just involves putting water into the meal package a certain time before you plan to eat ...


0

You don't say exactly where you're going in the UP, but my wife and I spent a week backpacking in the Porkies last year and it rained every day, for at least several hours. I also took a long trip with my son's Boy Scout troop to Pictured Rocks and it rained buckets then too. They were both great trips, but staying dry/comfortable took some doing. My pack ...


2

I've lived in Michigan for 20 years and have spent a lot of time backpacking in state, both in the UP and in lower MI. We've always followed the rules for storing food, hanging everything associated with cooking and eating along with all toiletries in a tree away from the trunk UNLESS we're at backcountry campsites that have bear poles or boxes, then we use ...


3

Everyone has given a lot of good advice about clothing and shoes. I'd like to add to what ShemSeger said about the tent. If you are expecting rain, or if it is raining, you want to be extra careful about how you set up your tent. Normally, you would just be looking for a nice, flat place without stones, but if you're expecting rain, that nice flat place can ...


8

TL;DR: Bring a set of clothes that are comfy-when-wet and expect to spend a lot of time in them. Keep a set of dry clothes for in-the-tent-only use. Don't ever let your wet clothes come into contact with your dry clothes, cause now you have a whole lot of damp clothes. I've done a lot of 3-week canoe trips and 3+ day winter hikes at -30 C (-22 F) ...


21

Don't get wet! No I'm not being facetious, I hike through the rain forests of BC all the time, I've spent days in a row in solid rain while backpacking and setting up camp. Getting wet up here can mean death overnight even in the middle of summer, doesn't matter how hot it gets during the day, temperatures can drop to near zero overnight, if you're wet when ...


3

As far as precautions go, look at everything and ask the question "what happens if it breaks?" It's much better to have several pounds of gear that you don't use, because the one time you do need it, you really do need it! The most pointless piece of equipment is the spare that's sat on the shelf at home. :) I'm used to solo walking, so I pack heavy and ...


5

Backpacking in rain is pretty normal in Oregon—especially along the coast and in the western Cascades. No matter the time of year, it is usually not more than a week until the next rain shower (except this summer which is unusually dry). I don't take any special or particular precautions. The Ten Essentials have been learned from thousands upon ...


9

My two concerns for trekking in wet weather are safety and comfort. The safety issue here is primarily hypothermia, which can be a real risk even in the upper 40s or lower 50s (F), if you're wet enough and out for a long period. Definitely something to be aware of. But even if you're warm enough to be safe, being soaking wet for a week just plain sucks- ...


0

I've done a good bit of backpacking in the south where raccoons/possums/rats can get bad. I usually will wrap all the food in the plastic bag and tie it tightly shut. Then put that into a stuff sack that is hung from a tree. Try to find a long branch and get it as far away from the trunk as possible. Also, make sure not to put any food in any other bags ...


14

What precautions should you take when going on a backpacking trip around the length of one week? Build a rough route card, where you plan to be and when. Give it to someone you trust who will keep track of you. That way if you get into serious trouble and can't get help yourself there will be someone to raise the alarm. Better than lying in a ditch ...


4

There are animals out there capable of figuring out how to get into your cache, Wolverines (a cousin of the racoon) are notorious for cracking into even the most cleverly hung food caches, but you don't really have to worry about them if you're only hanging your food for one night. Animals are more ambitious when they know their reward is food, but mere ...


6

I've backpacked in places that have raccoons but I've never had a problem with them. Squirrels and a number of birds can also chew/peck their way through a bag to get at your food. I don't know what kind of birds you have in Michigan, but here in Idaho, Clark's Nutcrackers and magpies can be a nuisance. A mesh bag will probably allow them access to your ...



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