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5

Bears don't generally like people, and the ones who do are usually going to be more interested in dumpsters and campgrounds than a random boat on the river. The likelihood of ever getting into a situation where you have to fend off a bear attack on the water is absurdly small. Bears are usually either crossing water to get somewhere else and want nothing to ...


4

I'll share what thoughts I had in the moment, and after, while reflecting on the matter: My first thought I've already mentioned in the question, being that the bear was slow and we were fast in our 17.5ft Kevlar Clipper Tripper, so we could have speedily paddled away no problem. But what if we were in a situation where a swift getaway wasn't an option, ...


4

All research done by the National Park Services attribute black bear aggression to how people affect the bear's foraging behavior. Bears are conditioned by where, when, and how they acquire food. If they find food nearby and easily accessible from dumpsters and tourists that feed them as if they're in a zoo, they begin to associate humans with easily ...


4

Bears behave differently in places where they are used to a lot of human activity vs places where they are generally left alone. They learn and adapt. For example, in the Adirondacks in NY, bears have become adept at recognizing and grabbing human food from "bear bags" (food hung from a tree, theoretically out of reach on a limb that won't support the bear's ...


3

Some of the things you've listed as precautions used in the US are not real or not reasonable. worry about the tent or shirt you sleep in smelling after food from 6 months ago This is silly. bear bells This is a joke. Using a bear canister, on the other hand, is reasonable and in fact legally required in some national parks in the US. But what ...


3

Animals are the least of your concerns at that altitude. I spend a lot of time at that elevation just on the other side of the border from Montana in Canada. Your elevation is less of a factor for animal encounters than what the weather is. Go hiking in the heat of the day and you will not see another living thing out on those rocks, because every critter ...


2

After taking a look into it, it appears that the grizzly bears in North America are actually a sub species (ssp.) of European brown bear. Brown Bear = Ursus arctos Grizzly Bear = Ursus arctos ssp. U. a. californicus (Recently extinct California Grizzly) U. a. gyas (Peninsular Grizzly) U. a. horribilis (Mainland Grizzly) U. a. middendorffi (Kodiak ...


1

I'll add to the existing answers by saying that the time of year likely does matter. I've been the Canadian Rockies up by Banff and some of those trails are heavily traveled. But, during the berry season (autumn), that doesn't stop bears from coming around even when you're not cooking something delicious. If you talk to folks who have hiked up there a ...



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