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29

The question asks for an instance where a bear climbing a tree attacks a human. I found a news article of a hunter being attacked by a black bear in a tree. I don't think this is a completely satisfying answer since the question implies the question: Why would a bear expend the effort to climb up a tree to attack a human? I am not a bear expert but I read ...


16

I know that if you cross the Bering Strait to Northern Asia (Siberia, etc.) you'll find that bears hibernate in huge nests in the tops of trees. So climbing trees is not a problem for bears. They must do it in that region because there are tigers about. The real question has to do with the nature of the bear in question. I've turned about in the woods to ...


13

It seems like you simply need to reverse the procedure you give. Since you initially had to pull the rope up far enough to tie the stick in to it, you can still pull it back up to the same point in order to untie the stick. Then let the bag lower down again, stick free. Here is my hastily doodled interpretation of the process. The stick is represented by ...


12

They are faster and can climb better than you, so if they want you they can get you. They rarely see you as real prey so they might not climb a tree to get at you, still... its a risk In this video you can see a bear climbing a tree where two hunters are. At first it looks like it could be the same bear you saw on the ground, but it's not, it's one bear ...


11

Why yes they can climb trees. According to www.fws.gov A common misconception is that grizzly bears, unlike black bears, cannot climb trees. While its long claws make climbing more difficult for a grizzly than for a black bear, a grizzly can get to you in a tree – it will more likely, however, be able to reach you before you reach the tree.


9

The suggestion to use wasp spray for defense seems to be common enough that there’s a Snopes page on the topic. This particular urban legend is more often brought up in the context of defense against people, but it seems now to have been extended to bears. I would stick with the bear spray. In the US, the phrase “It is a violation of Federal law to use ...


8

To answer this I need to split up your question a little bit. I'd like to know which kind of arrow would slow down or kill a bear Every arrow with a broad-head (= hunting point) attached. It doesn't matter whether it's made out of wood, aluminium or carbon, if the arrow fits you and your bow. Which vital spots should I aim at The lethal zone which is in ...


8

An online poll showed that almost everyone on a backpacking trip eats about 15-20 kcal (63-84 kJ) per day per pound of body weight: http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=35516 . So let's take 17.5 cal/day/lb (161 kJ/kg) as a typical value. This is in line with my actual experience from trips where ...


7

Many people travel for days or weeks in bear country. Several existing questions on this site address bear and camp/food related issues. If you've never traveled in areas with bears before, you should definitely give these a read: What are the proper precautions/protocols for storing food while car camping in an area with bears? What precautions should I ...


7

Bears don't generally like people, and the ones who do are usually going to be more interested in dumpsters and campgrounds than a random boat on the river. The likelihood of ever getting into a situation where you have to fend off a bear attack on the water is absurdly small. Bears are usually either crossing water to get somewhere else and want nothing to ...


6

I'm from bear country, I've had multiple bear encounters this year and the bears have been really bad this season. We had 4 maulings inside a month this summer. In answer to your questions: A1: The Mother bear is going to stay between you and her cub, this includes keeping her cub away from you as much as keeping you away from her cub. A2: Freeze dried ...


6

Realistically, if you can manage to carry the food, then you can manage the canisters also. They have been proven to decrease bear encounters and are actually now required in parts of Sierra National Forests, as well as in parts of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, Inyo National Forests and in all of Yosemite National Park [see map]. This means you ...


5

Chances are any black bear you encounter will be more frightened of you than you are of it, and it is unlikely they will chase you up a tree unless they are provoked. They definitely can climb trees, but they most likely will not chase a human up a tree nor attack unless provoked or protecting their cubs. They're primarily interested in your food. In this ...


5

Learn their behaviors: many encounters become accidents because they escalate to that level in a way or the other. Learn that not all the bears are the same, different kind will act differently. As general rule they don't want trouble as much as you don't. Knowing how they act, what they protect and fight for, where they tend to be/go would ...


5

I think part of the answer to your question relates to WHERE in the Rockies you'll be visiting. Will you be in an area that is not visited much by humans, or will you be visiting a high-traffic area such as a national park or other popular tourist destination? If you will be hiking through an area that has few or sporadic hikers, then you really have ...


5

All research done by the National Park Services attribute black bear aggression to how people affect the bear's foraging behavior. Bears are conditioned by where, when, and how they acquire food. If they find food nearby and easily accessible from dumpsters and tourists that feed them as if they're in a zoo, they begin to associate humans with easily ...


5

Is this interpretation plausible, or are we just anthropomorphizing? The bear cub was likely scared and it's reaction was to put on an aggressive act. TBH I think you were lucky as a threatened mother bear corned with it's cub in the dark like that could of easily charged you. The mother was likely trying to decide if it could get away without getting ...


5

Unless you sever the spinal column near the top of the body there is no body injury that can be done with a knife that is going to result in instant death/disablement of any animal. Any injury that does not completely disable the animals neurological system is going to be dependent on the animal bleeding to the point that they become unconscious. Even if ...


5

There is not a huge amount of information on the subject of a Polar Bear Guard Training Course. It seems to be a three day course that deals more on deterrent methods and polar bear protection, than on shooting these bears, although this too is included in the training. I am going to limit myself to Canada, although other counties do in fact have similar ...


4

I'll share what thoughts I had in the moment, and after, while reflecting on the matter: My first thought I've already mentioned in the question, being that the bear was slow and we were fast in our 17.5ft Kevlar Clipper Tripper, so we could have speedily paddled away no problem. But what if we were in a situation where a swift getaway wasn't an option, ...


4

Anyone that says you shouldn't carry a handgun in bear country is misinformed about a lot of things. Better would be a .12 gauge shotgun with slugs, but let's deal with the handgun issue. Sure, bear spray is good to have, and we all like to have recourse to non-lethal measures, but if it comes to playing dead or shooting a bear in self-defense, I'll shoot ...


4

Your tent may not provide any physical protection, but your sleeping bag will provide some. Sleeping bags cover the vast majority of your body, and the thick material of a sleeping bag will initially provide minor protection from claws and teeth. A common strategy for dealing with bear attacks is to employ counter measures. Obviously countermeasures are ...


4

Bears behave differently in places where they are used to a lot of human activity vs places where they are generally left alone. They learn and adapt. For example, in the Adirondacks in NY, bears have become adept at recognizing and grabbing human food from "bear bags" (food hung from a tree, theoretically out of reach on a limb that won't support the bear's ...


4

I'm assuming that you are not hunting as that would require behaving in different ways. I'm also not discussing camping/camp which is covered very well by this question: What precautions should I take to protect myself and my camp from bears? In black bear territory, but prior to seeing a bear: Make noise. The bear will generally move away from you. ...


4

Bryce Towsley has this story to tell us about a grizzly attack: Shortly before I arrived in one northern Alaska camp, a couple of packers were rushing to beat the failing light. Covered with blood and loaded down with packs of caribou meat that doubled the weight pressing on their boots, they were tired and thinking mostly about a hot meal and a dry ...


3

Some of the things you've listed as precautions used in the US are not real or not reasonable. worry about the tent or shirt you sleep in smelling after food from 6 months ago This is silly. bear bells This is a joke. Using a bear canister, on the other hand, is reasonable and in fact legally required in some national parks in the US. But what ...


3

Animals are the least of your concerns at that altitude. I spend a lot of time at that elevation just on the other side of the border from Montana in Canada. Your elevation is less of a factor for animal encounters than what the weather is. Go hiking in the heat of the day and you will not see another living thing out on those rocks, because every critter ...


3

In 2013 I did an long trip (12 days) in the Rockies (near Banff/Lake Louise National Parks). We were entirely back country, except for the very first camp site. In this area brown bears are the biggest worry, so we used a bear hang. Arguably this can also work against black bears (at least in areas where the buggers haven't become so clever that they figure ...


3

A grizzly bear can climb a tree with relative ease if it has branches large enough for it to grab onto, but they can't climb trees like a black bear can, especially a larger grizzly, they're much more able in trees when they're younger and smaller. Climbing a tree is in fact an effective method of avoiding a Grizzly bear that may be following you, but it is ...


2

A few years ago I was walking in the woods in western Washington state (USA) the forest was Douglas fir, with undergrowth ranging between 2 and 10 feet high (1 - 3 meters). There was no trail. I was trying to be quite as I was hunting squirrels with a 22 rifle. The area I was in had brush about knee high. Suddenly a short distance in front of me I heard a ...



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