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23

If you are running long distances over multiple days with boots, packs etc., and you must complete the distance you should plan to pop a blister at the end of day, but then you need to be sure you add some sort of padding to replace the protection the blister is giving you. You also need it cleaned and sealed, so antibacterial cleaner, then compeed, fakeskin ...


21

The key is reducing friction. Duct tape can be a good preventative as long as you get it on before a blister forms. After the blister is there, it's harder to recommend as once you're ready to remove the duct tape, you might pull the blister along with it. Other options are to make sure you're wearing dry non-cotton socks. If you find your feet sweat a lot ...


16

My mother, who is a doctor, has always told me to let blisters be. Keeping them unpopped keeps them clean and sterile, and (if I recall correctly) the fluid in them actually helps them heal faster. If you're in the wilderness, you really don't want to pop them and risk infection. Even if you have antibacterials, a popped blister is likely to contact dirt and ...


15

I've never succeed in "hardening" my feet against blisters, even when I was barefoot growing up. However these things have worked for me Vaseline or (preferably) diaper rash ointment before putting on socks Injinji toe socks (If I double socks, these are always my base layer) These worked on long hikes even when my feet got wet, and even in poorly ...


14

The risk is that the blisters will get worse and worse, and continue to interfere with your hiking experience. They can get larger, more painful, and eventually tear open and risk getting infected. This process can happen fairly quickly - from the first time you notice pain in your feet, blisters can develop in < 15 minutes. I haven't personally tried ...


12

It depends in part on how you got the blisters, but from the question I think we can take it to mean that they're from friction. In order of what you can expect They will get worse and larger. They will pop. The friction that you haven't dealt with will continue. It is now rubbing on much softer skin. It will literally rub away skin (I've had this ...


12

Hiking boots excel in a few situations: Extended side-hilling/traversing. Good boots take the stress off your ankles People with bad ankles. The ankle support of a good boot is hard to argue with. If you have ankle problems, I don't think trail runnes are appropriate. Heavy loads. Even if you don't have ankle problems, you'll get them lugging around ...


10

The #1 remedy I use is good old fashioned Duct Tape. I will usually put a large strip around the back of my ankle every morning before putting my socks on, just as a precaution. It sticks well and allows your boot and sock to rub around without rubbing directly on the skin, causing hotspots.


8

Here is my magic blister treatment method. You need to have this stuff in your kit: Lanolin: Yes, otherwise known as sheep grease. Sold in pharmacies as an aid for breastfeeding mothers. It is essentially a lubricant wax that will keep a blister happy and not stuck to what you put over it. You put a daub of this directly on the blistered area. ...


8

I will share what they told me when I was on a one month group-organised trek through the Balkan Mountains in Bulgaria. This is what the leader / group medic did. If you are going to end the trek soon, don't bother the blister. However, if you know that you will need to abuse that part of the body over the next days, and you know the blister is going to ...


7

Blisters are caused by friction. Your skin is not very slippery. Applying moleskin and duct-tape over a "hot-spot" adds a protective layer between your skin and shoe. Thus as your shoe slides, it rubs against the tape or mole-skin instead of your skin. Pointers: Use enough tape/mole-skin to cover an area larger than the hot-spot. If the hotspot is on the ...


7

Getting a pair of boots that correctly fit is very important. Go to a reputable hiking shop and having a knowledgeable assistant give you multiple types of boots with different fits and see which feels best. Changing inner sole thickness can be a big help to get the correct fit. Properly breaking in your boots can be a huge help. Wear them for an hour round ...


6

I would imagine you might not have compeed, if you don't have moleskin with you, but I just thought I'd mention it as a nice measure to prevent/treat blisters. I would also recommend carrying less weight and using a lighter pair of shoes, instead of a heavy pair of boots. Those blisters are your feet's way of telling you something isn't working well in ...


6

I will share what I know about Blisters and what I could do to suffer least from them. Blisters are mainly due to wetness, let it be through Actual wet shoes and socks, or let them be due to Sweat. These are the few things that I follow and since I have started doing those things, I have managed to make the suffering too far less frequent, even if I trek for ...


5

This is actually very simple. You use them as both a cushioning material and a way to prevent your shoe rubbing on your skin. If you have a problem area, products such as Compeed cushions, mole skin etc work really well, but in an emergency duct tape should work just fine. Just stick them over the area, making sure the edges don't catch on anything in ...


5

Maybe? It may depend on where you're getting the blisters. A lot of the blisters that I get from hiking boots are on my heels, or on the sides of my toes. I don't think that barefoot walking would help build calluses in those places. If you want to walk barefoot, go ahead an experiment with that. But I'd also look at the general advice for avoid ...


4

I would argue you answered your own question in your first comment: I think it's the way the boots fit It is a myth that leather boots should require a painful bludgeoning period to break them in. You will come across all kinds of creative solutions to get you over the hump - but all of them are dealing with the symptoms of the real problem: you ...


4

Blisters are more frequent between the toes than Anywhere on the bottom of the feet. And, with heavy trekking shoes, you are most likely to sustain blisters around toes and between them, so I guess as the above guy (theJollySin) said walking barefoot wont help much with blisters, But yeah it does help you to Harden your skin, make your ankle recover from any ...


4

I've always used Compeed blister plasters to treat a blister. It's like covering the blister with a second, more durable skin. You are supposed to leave the plaster on until it falls off naturally which, for me, is usually three or four days. They are a little expensive but your feet will thank you for them. By the way, I am not affiliated with Compeed ...


3

So, like I said, I'm not a great expert on using duct tape and moleskin. I'm writing an answer because someone specifically asked. :) My experiences: First off - applying duct tape or moleskin to your feet is a skill you develop through trial and error. Make sure that you learn to do it BEFORE going on a major expedition. Whenever I have a big hiking ...


3

The other answers are good, but here's my personal experience, as well as some of the common advice I didn't see. Cause - The two causes of blisters while hiking are moisture and friction. This means you want to keep your feet dry and not sliding around, which is where proper boots comes in, as mentioned above. Proactive - You should treat blisters early. ...


2

I do a few things and they are helping very much: Walk around in Barefoot Running Shoes. You don't have to get the freaky ones with the separated toes. I have ones that look like normal sneakers. Learn the fox walk Wear double socks. One thin pair and one normal pair. The friction will get distributed. Try to walk slower and enjoy the hike by paying more ...


2

I wouldn't burst it, especially if I was going to be hiking for a few more days - if it does end up getting infected then this could end up making things a lot worse - and it's more likely to happen in the wild! Instead, I'd advise reducing the irritation as much as possible by wearing multiple / thicker socks, and use blister plasters if you have them. If ...


2

I almost always hike in tennis shoes (court shoes) if it's reasonably dry and free of snow. I use them for climbs, day hikes, and backpacking. I don't have ankle problems, so I don't the ankle support. The tennis shoes grip rocks better and have better padding than my boots. (I do carry extra socks, though, for dry feet.)


2

On the topic of popping blisters. There are the two contradicting opinions out there, of course. My understanding is as follows. Do not pop a blister if you can avoid it. If walking significant distance is needed, pop it with a clean needle, squeeze out the liquid, and put an antibiotical bandage over it. The gains are twofold: The blister won't pop in ...


1

I haven't tried @Vorac answer, but it sounds interesting. I'm not going to say if popping a blister is correct or not. But, if you do, this is how I was taught to pop a blister: Get a needle (sterile of course) About 1/3 of an inch from the blister, insert the needle under the skin towards the blister. When it reaches the blister, remove the needle. There ...



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