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14

The risk is that the blisters will get worse and worse, and continue to interfere with your hiking experience. They can get larger, more painful, and eventually tear open and risk getting infected. This process can happen fairly quickly - from the first time you notice pain in your feet, blisters can develop in < 15 minutes. I haven't personally tried ...


12

It depends in part on how you got the blisters, but from the question I think we can take it to mean that they're from friction. In order of what you can expect They will get worse and larger. They will pop. The friction that you haven't dealt with will continue. It is now rubbing on much softer skin. It will literally rub away skin (I've had this ...


7

Blisters are caused by friction. Your skin is not very slippery. Applying moleskin and duct-tape over a "hot-spot" adds a protective layer between your skin and shoe. Thus as your shoe slides, it rubs against the tape or mole-skin instead of your skin. Pointers: Use enough tape/mole-skin to cover an area larger than the hot-spot. If the hotspot is on the ...


6

I will share what I know about Blisters and what I could do to suffer least from them. Blisters are mainly due to wetness, let it be through Actual wet shoes and socks, or let them be due to Sweat. These are the few things that I follow and since I have started doing those things, I have managed to make the suffering too far less frequent, even if I trek for ...


5

This is actually very simple. You use them as both a cushioning material and a way to prevent your shoe rubbing on your skin. If you have a problem area, products such as Compeed cushions, mole skin etc work really well, but in an emergency duct tape should work just fine. Just stick them over the area, making sure the edges don't catch on anything in ...


5

Maybe? It may depend on where you're getting the blisters. A lot of the blisters that I get from hiking boots are on my heels, or on the sides of my toes. I don't think that barefoot walking would help build calluses in those places. If you want to walk barefoot, go ahead an experiment with that. But I'd also look at the general advice for avoid ...


4

Blisters are more frequent between the toes than Anywhere on the bottom of the feet. And, with heavy trekking shoes, you are most likely to sustain blisters around toes and between them, so I guess as the above guy (theJollySin) said walking barefoot wont help much with blisters, But yeah it does help you to Harden your skin, make your ankle recover from any ...


3

So, like I said, I'm not a great expert on using duct tape and moleskin. I'm writing an answer because someone specifically asked. :) My experiences: First off - applying duct tape or moleskin to your feet is a skill you develop through trial and error. Make sure that you learn to do it BEFORE going on a major expedition. Whenever I have a big hiking ...


2

On the topic of popping blisters. There are the two contradicting opinions out there, of course. My understanding is as follows. Do not pop a blister if you can avoid it. If walking significant distance is needed, pop it with a clean needle, squeeze out the liquid, and put an antibiotical bandage over it. The gains are twofold: The blister won't pop in ...


1

I haven't tried @Vorac answer, but it sounds interesting. I'm not going to say if popping a blister is correct or not. But, if you do, this is how I was taught to pop a blister: Get a needle (sterile of course) About 1/3 of an inch from the blister, insert the needle under the skin towards the blister. When it reaches the blister, remove the needle. There ...



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