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9

I want to rent a boat (not a pontoon, but one with a sleeping area, bathroom etc.) which I can use for an overnight stay in open ocean. I am an absolute beginner about boats and don't know anything besides that boats run on water. For virtually all skill levels this is a very poor idea. You should not under (almost) any circumstances spend the night in ...


8

I would suggest not sleeping on the boat. Apart from the safety issues this will bring up - the boat could slowly lose air, or could start drifting away, the water could rise, ... - it will not protect you against wind or rain. So in any case, the least I'd suggest for you to get is a good tarp or a rain-proof bivouac sleeping bag. A tent is obviously even ...


7

With a large enough canoe, you can simply put the bike in the canoe, albeit somewhat precariously. What's more common though is for people to bike their canoe to an input, lock up the bike on shore, then return to it. A good alternative is a folding bike. They're not as efficient to ride for long distances, but can easily be fit inside a canoe. For ...


6

I can't help you with exact configurations. But as usual this kind of thing has a basic rule. The less it's activated, the less it will use it's battery. Standby mode (time it spends counting the seconds to next use) will use almost no power at all. As soon as it comes to life it will aquire a GPS signal, Triangulate it's position and send it to a server ...


6

Some considerations I can think of: Legality As long as it is not a nature reserve or a military restricted area, it should be allowed. You could probably check with some authority if it applies to the smaller islands as well. I would just try to contact Naturvårdsverket or Gothenburgs tourist agency. Safety Since its in the blatic sea, tides aren´t that ...


6

Wile the faint of heart might find this answer disturbing, Yes it is fine to sleep on an inflatable boat, if it is durable thick rubber like a Zodiak. I have done so many times, and find it quite relaxing even on the Rappahannock and Potomac rivers. These after all are life raft level construction. You are actually safer in a boat on the water than in a ...


6

There is not a definitive guide for all locks, however most of the major locks in the US are run by the US Army Corps of Engineers, and they do not charge recreational boaters to pass through them. To my knowledge, all locks on the Upper Mississippi are accessible via paddling. As for the Ohio river, you can try calling McAlpine lock and dam, and they'll be ...


5

You've got quite a bit of study before you are ready for this kind of voyage. I am not how far off shore "open ocean" means to you, but if it's anything beyond swimming distance to shore, you're going to need more training. What is the kind of boat called? Generally it is called a bareboat charter. To my knowledge, most bareboat charters are for sailboats. ...


5

Overall I think you should be okay with just making sure that the contact points on the oars are a bit padded, or at least, the contact point is not sharp. That way it shouldn't rub on the oar and degrade or scratch the finish. Rubber is a common way to keep oars in place without scratching the finish. You could consider using guitar hooks to keep them in ...


5

John Montgomery here, designer of the Autocanoe. I think that with a careful build and a few modifications for taller freeboard and a small forward cabin a long trip would be quite viable. Especially if you have some previous experience with this kind of trip. The main thing being to foresee and plan for the mitigation of contingencies. My friend Colin ...


5

If you want to remain stationary, you need a solid anchor, and the best option is going to be to attach to a tree or something that you can securely fix to on the bank. Not knowing that river, I can't say whether that would work or not, so I'll discuss anchoring to the bottom. This is the same procedure for anchoring in a tide or a river, except in a river ...


5

When I built my canoe, the front and back keel stems needed to be bent. I steamed the wood by putting it in some ABS pipe and putting that over a kettle. It's been over 25 years, but I think there was cloth stuffed at the top of the pipe to keep the steam in, or something like that. I left the wood steaming until it was warm and soft, and then clamped it in ...


5

The Ashley Book of Knots (published 1944) references the outside bowline as "inferior" but just says weakness nothing specific. In America the "outside" bowline is often called the "Dutch" bowline or Cowboy Bowline. So since, you ask, why is the bowline on Outdoor Stack Exchange tied with the end on the inside? because that is the classic bowline. End on the ...


3

So, there are a number of challenges you face. Firstly, what is the reason for wanting a mizzen? It will change the sailing characteristics significantly, as well as require a lot of work. tl;dr - this is a fair old undertaking to do for no obvious reason. If you do decide to add one, you have 2 real options - a small, unstayed mizzen off the transom, or a ...


3

This is based on what we did for ours, and may not be specific to your model (but should hold true) Take off the prop and grease every season When storing drain all fluids I actually find that mine works better if the first tank of the season is premium, good quality gas. Take out the spark plug and store separately. I apply a tad of oil to the plug ...


2

Sleeping in an inflatable boat could be very similar to sleeping on a water bed. Water beds have heaters for the water, or else it is rather cold. Check the temperature of the river before you decide on this. (Other answers already providing other forms of safety advise, but non mentioned temperature.)


2

A bowline is not recommended for tying a boat to a pole because it can work itself loose over time, or when bounced. Instead, the recommendations are an anchor bend or a double bowline - and as an anchor bend can become impossibly tight over time, a double bowline might suit you best: from Wikipedia In saying that, if you must use a bowline, having the ...


2

From the link @Amine posted, the following areas are key: For the keel area check the joints between planks and frames visually, looking for gaps or any sign that the plank is not tight against the frame. Then use a screw driver to test the wood for softness on both plank and frame near the mating surface. Try to slip the pry bar under the frame and pry ...


2

Variety and number of boats. Added price for fuel/weekends. Level of upkeep (how to check that?) Members to boats ratio, to know how easy it is to find an available boat. Special rules/limits (of people on the boats, maximum rentals per month, night rentals, etc...). Club activities. Membership cancellation/freeze policies.


1

This will depend entirely on the type of boom and outhaul. If you have a simple straight through outhaul: If you have completely lost the outhaul, either get yourself a fish tape (from your local DIY store) or use a small plumb bob and fishing line. A fish tape should work even when the boom is horizontal, but in order to use a plumb bob you'll probably ...


1

In addition to David's answer, I'd also include training courses membership in points racing league RYA accreditation, at least in the UK adult and child friendly/capable (is it targeted at children or adults or both) facilities, e.g. anti fouling, over winter storage, maintenance etc location - is it somewhere you want to sail from?


1

In Hebrew, the bowline knot is translated as a rescue knot, so I assume the reason it is used is the fact that the chances of it untying unintentionally is low. When having the knot end on the inside, the end of the knot needs to move despite the added friction from the object or person the end of the knot is against. When using the end on the outside, it ...


1

Russell's comment is very valid, however the first things to look at in any case: If the outboard is moved by cable from a steering wheel, check every cable guide and the bearings in the steering wheel. All should be lubricated, without rust and freely moving. The bearings on the outboard pivot should also be lubricated and freely moving All those should ...


1

For commercial vessels, such as ferries, most countries do have regulations which boats are assessed against, and a maximum number of passengers are defined for each boat. There are also a number of countries where this doesn't apply, or where regulations are not enforced. Update - removed the rest as I see now you are looking at regulations, not physical ...



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