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11

Check out the SAS Survival Handbook. It's clear, concise, to the point, and contains a lot of good survival information.


9

It might sound a bit odd and not-so-related to the question, but have you considered carrying a Kindle? I got used to carry mine along, wherever I go (bagpacking included). Advantages it doesn't get bent corners and broken spine; if you pack it in a good place, it doesn't break at all a fully charged battery lasts several weeks it is quite lightweight ...


9

I'm not sure if there is something you know about temperature's affect on books that I do not? I would not have thought temperature would be a problem. That aside, i think the ziplock solution is pretty good. It obviously doesn't provide any rigid support, but if you aren't concerned about that, there are a myriad of dry bags / pouches, map cases & ...


8

Cody Lundin's 98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive! is a good introduction. It deals more with the psychological and physiological issues of survival than specific techniques.


6

This book, How to stay alive in the Woods, is an older book but contains lots of valuable information on how to keep from getting hungry, and other useful things, while away from civilization.


4

As chd mentioned 98.6 Degrees is an excellent book. It is mainly focused on practical things you can do to survive and like chd on the physiological aspect of it. If you are looking to read about the psychology of survival and the mental attitude that promotes it I highly recommend Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why. And of course, as always ...


4

There are several equivalents just as there is for the AT. I would consider Halfmile maps combined with PocketPCT. Halfmile's PCT maps 'Erik the Black' books PCT Data Book Pocket PCT U.S. Forest Service PCT Yogi's Wilderness Press books / databook ('official') The PCTA also provides a listing and sells books. Guthook has a review on his blog entry. I ...


3

I do not know of specific comic books other than Ultralight Backpackin' Tips which has cartoon illustrations. However it is far from a comic book. :-) WhiteBlaze features some comic strips about hiking/thru-hiking on their website. And others have also made some hiking-related comics such as Keith Roberts.


3

Climbing: Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills Canoeing: Backpacking: Backcountry cooking: NOLS Cookery Bike touring: Telemark Skiing: Allen & Mike's Really Cool Telemark Book


2

Climbing and Mountaineering in Europe Pit Schubert: Sicherheit und Risiko in Fels und Eis (Safety and Danger on Rocks and Ice). This is essentially a huge catalog of all the mistakes you can make while climbing and being in the mountains, supported by statistics and scientific tests. Unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be an English translation of the ...


2

Backpacking Trail Life by Ray Jardine Ray is one of the pioneers of ultralight backpacking, if not the pioneer, not to mention expert kayaker and freeclimber. This book changed how I see backpacking from the Boy Scout/Army way to a better way. Ray's guidance made backpacking fun for me. Non-Factual The Road More or Less Traveled Okay, here's one ...


2

Backcountry first aid and medicine Wilderness Medicine This book covers it all. Do you need to know about that snake that bit you? Look in here. Did someone fall and break their ankle? This has you covered. Do you have rampant diarrhea? How dangerous is that rash? Will eating snow fix your dehydration? This book will have you covered if you're a dirt ...


2

I really liked this book, mainly because it's on real experiment, but it's in french: http://www.amazon.ca/Surviethon-Vingt-cinq-ans-plus-tard/dp/2894314345 It's base on two person who decided to test their ability to survive for 30 days with almost nothing.


2

Ernest Thompson Seton's book, like Rolf in the Woods or Two Little Savages are inspiration for backwoodmanship, especially for young people.


2

I like Les Stroud's(survivorman) book called "Survive!". Just like in his tv show, he outlines survival in all different climates and locales. It's very specific and sounds like something that would interest you. There's a great(and short) list of survival books here. Another of my favorites is "Wildwood Wisdom" which isn't locale specific but focuses on ...


1

Highly subjective question, with a highly subjective answer: This book: Allen and Mikes Really Cool Backcountry Ski Book is always tops on my list for first time winter explorers. It fits both your criteria. Beyond that, the old standards like Freedom of the Hills have good general and technical knowledge related to all season camping and travel.


1

Of Water and Spirit from Malidoma Patrice Somé. Although this book is not explicitly about nature, it is about people who live in unity with it. There is one very strong moment in the book that inspires very strongly for contact with nature, and very deeply describes its transformative qualities. You will not be dissapointed.


1

Curious naturalists by Niko Tinbergen. This is one of the best books on ethology of animals, pleasure to read for anyone. It motivates to study and observe animals in their natural habitat. I was especially delighted by the story of hobby family or the interesting life of sand wasps.


1

Hatchet - by Gary Paulsen This one get me hooked at a young age.


1

Peter Mathiessen's The Snow Lepoard. I actually read it after (not before) trekking from Pokhara to the Dolpo region in Nepal, but I think it meets your description of a book that "just makes you want to get out there". It's an excellent description of what it was like to make that journey thirty years earlier (around 1973). It's not just an inspiring book ...


1

"list" questions can cause problems on stackexchange sites, but, anyhow... From a UK perspective, Robert Macfarlane's "The Wild Places" is excellent.


1

The Pocket Survival Guide. by J. Wayne Fears Accurate, concise, to the point.



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