Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

31

Hiking blisters are from friction. When things shift, your sock is more likely to stay with your boot than your foot as the two fabrics (or leather and fabric) will catch each other. This leaves the sock moving against your foot, which causes friction. When you wear two socks, specifically a smooth liner and a wool hiking sock, the outer sock moves ...


16

Blisters usually form when your socks get sweaty and things start to rub around. When I first bought my pair of boots, the man in the store told me to wear them around the house for an hour every night for a week or two before my trip. This gives you a chance to break in the leather slowly over time, while keeping your feet blister-free. Obviously, this ...


15

I've never succeed in "hardening" my feet against blisters, even when I was barefoot growing up. However these things have worked for me Vaseline or (preferably) diaper rash ointment before putting on socks Injinji toe socks (If I double socks, these are always my base layer) These worked on long hikes even when my feet got wet, and even in poorly ...


13

There are a lot of unspecified variables involved here... type of socks, fit of the shoe/boot, type of shoe, conditions you are hiking in, etc. But in general, double-socking may offer the following which may help prevent blisters: reduced friction - assuming one sock is a thin slick liner sock which tends to stick to your foot while the outer sock ...


12

One of the things I've heard that wildland firefighters like to do (they often wear large, all leather boots, like these: Danner Flashpoint II) is put on the boots, stand in the bathtub with water and let the water soak through the boots with your feet on, and then wear them around the house for a few hours. It seems to work - as it softens the boots and ...


12

Hiking boots excel in a few situations: Extended side-hilling/traversing. Good boots take the stress off your ankles People with bad ankles. The ankle support of a good boot is hard to argue with. If you have ankle problems, I don't think trail runnes are appropriate. Heavy loads. Even if you don't have ankle problems, you'll get them lugging around ...


11

While this is by far not a universal truth, in general, women tend to have more slender feet than men. Then again - some women have wide, plate-like feet, and some men have thin feet. Also, I've noticed that women's hill shoes tend to be 'prettier' (I'm not sure why - I doubt that this is actually a consideration for most hillwalking women - but that's just ...


11

You can get some trail gaiters. (This REI link gives a good overview of different types of gaiters, their components, and materials they can be made from.) They're basically little sleeve-like things that have a strap to go around the bottom of your hiking boot, and they come up to mid-calf usually. Because they overlap with both your boot and your pants, ...


10

Correct size. That might sound obvious, but consider also width and height (of the instep). Each make is a bit different, so there's a need to try on many before you find one that fits really good. For all-day trips get boots one size larger than your usual office shoes are. Vibram sole If properly maintained, leather upper is much more waterproof and ...


9

My experience in this field is quite limited, but this is what I'd look for: Light - Hiking boots should be as light as possible. Believe me when I say that walking around when carrying a ton sucks. A proper sole - and by proper I mean one that isn't too hard or too soft. Too hard will provide little to no traction on slippery surfaces, and one that is too ...


9

I'm not aware of any boots for your specific need, but there may be some other options using a larger size boot. Preferably you should have little if any pressure from your toes against the front of your boot. For me, the solution to a loose boot has been to add a second insole which keeps a laced boot snug at the ankle while leaving the toes with room to ...


8

In answer to the original question: There are several products on the market designed for dogs with sore paw pads. These are often wax based, and adhere to the skin to provide some protection. (Google: Dog Paw Wax). Super-glue bonds well to skin, and can provide a layer of protection. A medically sterile version called "liquid stitches" in used in the ...


8

Here is my magic blister treatment method. You need to have this stuff in your kit: Lanolin: Yes, otherwise known as sheep grease. Sold in pharmacies as an aid for breastfeeding mothers. It is essentially a lubricant wax that will keep a blister happy and not stuck to what you put over it. You put a daub of this directly on the blistered area. ...


8

The cold weather boot will definitely be too warm for 40-80F (4.4-26.7C). I will definitely choose warmer hiking boots rather and bring two pairs socks types in such condition : warm and normal. Just start with the normal socks and if you are too cold then switch for the warmer. Remember that sweating is worse than being a bit cold. Last but not least, ...


8

The best qualities of caving footware are actually easy to clean (especially now with WNS concerns) easy to walk/crawl in (must fit well and now slide around) keep your feet warm durable (caves eat clothing) Watertight shoes hold water in just was well as they keep water out, and in a wet cave water will get in. First get yourself a pair of 3mm ...


7

Whatever you do, the membrane will wear out in a few years. That's one of the reasons why many people prefer leather boots, because once the membrane starts to leak, they can still waterproof the leather (it's much harder to perfectly waterproof textile). That said, you can always try to keep the membrane as long as possible. One thing manufacturers ...


7

Getting a pair of boots that correctly fit is very important. Go to a reputable hiking shop and having a knowledgeable assistant give you multiple types of boots with different fits and see which feels best. Changing inner sole thickness can be a big help to get the correct fit. Properly breaking in your boots can be a huge help. Wear them for an hour round ...


7

Any advice is greatly appreciated; I can't really afford new boots Well there goes my #1 piece of advice - I don't want to rub it in too much at all, but it just goes to show how important it is to make sure your boots will be comfortable before committing. At this point it sounds like they're just a poor fit, they shouldn't be causing that much pain ...


6

As an interim step, have you tried the Vibram Five Fingers running shoes - these still have protection under your feet, but give a lot of freedom as they are very thin. This could let you see how you get on.


6

If you're going to walk outside barefoot then my advice is to just go with it - build up the strength on short distances and eventually you shouldn't have an issue with hiking long distances just barefoot. This article claims someone who hiked around South Island barefoot, so it's definitely possible, but I wouldn't try that straight away! If you decide you ...


6

I have a feeling this question is going to come up a lot on this site... as I mentioned here it is an old and persistent myth that full leather boots will necessarily have a blister-inducing break-in period. Well-built boots that fit properly can be broken in fairly easily and blister-free. Hot-spots and rubbing are usually an indication of a poor fit ...


6

The first commandment of leather care is to never let your boots dry too quickly, for example on direct sun or next to a source of heat. The leather could crack or shrink. You have to let them dry slowly. Second, you should use something to keep the leather in good shape. There are tons of products for this, so pick a dependable outdoors brand and use what ...


6

I think those were the original 3-pin Nordic Norm bindings. From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ski_binding#Cross_country: 75 mm (Rottefella, Nordic Norm, 3-pin) This is the original, classic system found on cross country skis, invented by Bror With. These bindings, once the standard, are no longer as popular as they were but still hold a significant ...


6

When would actually one want to wear exactly cotton socks? Hygienic reasons where washing your socks hot (95 °C) and frequently is important. I guess the most common such reason (besides being doctor/nurse/...) is having a fungal infection. In that case in addition to the proper medication you should change your socks frequently (if they get moist even ...


6

Any advice is greatly appreciated; I can't really afford new boots, especially since this experience has taught me I probably shouldn't buy cheap ones, but I really do need some as I keep missing hiking and walking activities. I wouldn't characterize those boots as cheap. 150 pounds is $250, which is a lot of money. If expensive, heavy boots aren't ...


5

Are you sure you need boots? I absolutely love my trail running shoes (La Sportiva Wildcats). They are much lighter than boots, and while they aren't water proof, they dry out very quickly due to being mostly mesh uppers. On hot days, you can literally feel the breeze through the uppers. It is very nice for me as my feet tend to sweat a lot in boots.


5

What you want is called "skin". However, that's not something you just add on one day and go hiking for days. Keep in mind that our species evolved to get around by walking and running with our feet. Our feet have evolved to handle that. Unfortunately, habitually wearing shoes eliminates the stimuli that the feet need to produce the necessary thick skin ...


5

Put them in your sink and fill the sink with warm water and possibly some soap. Leave them like that overnight, then hang them to dry the next morning. You won't smell them while they're in the water and in the morning, the smell will be gone (and the water will have an interesting colour).


5

First I recommend "moleskin" this is a padding with a adhesive back that you can cut to size and stick to your foot for the problem areas. It is used for blisters, but if you have a problem spot you can let it get worn down first instead of you foot. Wear two pairs of socks, but two different types. The first pair being a thin "dress sock" type or something ...


4

I know the author of the original question has already make their purchase, but for anyone else out there, I would recommend getting a set of mountain-grade leather boots, like the La Sportiva Nepal. They are much kinder to your feet - plastic boots break your feet in, not the other way around!



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible