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9

Any advice is greatly appreciated; I can't really afford new boots Well there goes my #1 piece of advice - I don't want to rub it in too much at all, but it just goes to show how important it is to make sure your boots will be comfortable before committing. At this point it sounds like they're just a poor fit, they shouldn't be causing that much pain ...


8

The army solution is to have two pairs of boots so that one pair dries while the other is worn (yes, even in the field). Another solution is to use goretex socks so that it doesn't matter what state you boots are in. I find wool socks keep warmth even when wet, and don't chafe or cause blisters the way cotton socks can when wet. You can air dry goretex ...


7

I am not entirely sure, but I think you are referring to boots like the La Sportiva Nepal. In this case, while these shoes are as you mentioned designed primarerly for technical mountaineering, you should not expect these sort of problems. I did my military service mostly in these boots and we did a lot of marching on flat concrete. While this is a shameful ...


7

Any advice is greatly appreciated; I can't really afford new boots, especially since this experience has taught me I probably shouldn't buy cheap ones, but I really do need some as I keep missing hiking and walking activities. I wouldn't characterize those boots as cheap. 150 pounds is $250, which is a lot of money. If expensive, heavy boots aren't ...


7

I too recommend newspaper however you can also give the following a try: Buy a pack of disposable diapers and empty the sodium polyacrylate into a sock or any fine mesh cloth/bag. Carry it in your pack for any absorption emergency. You should make sure to pack it in a sealed waterproof bag until you need it. Otherwise it will suck the humidity from its ...


6

You could use a towel or (if you can spare the weight) some old news papers. Me and my friends dry everything except for the tents by fire. Just set a line about 3-4 meters away from the fire so it will only catch some of the heat (30-50 degrees Celsius is fine for anything). I know this really doesn't give you an alternative and I'm interested to see what ...


6

My personal recommendation would be to use Super/Krazy Glue for any small "cracks" in the rubber. I have successfully used it on rubber and it is quite effective! for the slightly larger holes than cannot be filled using a liquid glue, I would recommend the following: Apply a Gore-Tex or similar patch along with some "Shoe-Goo" or similar product. **After ...


5

First I recommend "moleskin" this is a padding with a adhesive back that you can cut to size and stick to your foot for the problem areas. It is used for blisters, but if you have a problem spot you can let it get worn down first instead of you foot. Wear two pairs of socks, but two different types. The first pair being a thin "dress sock" type or something ...


5

Your best bet for sewing is to use a Speedy Stitcher. The thick gauged thread works really well in boot/shoe repairs and is easy to use. You will be punching holes through the leather which creates potential for water to invade, but the waxy thread helps eliminate this issue. I would finish up with a coat of Sno-Seal, which is a great way to help ...


4

From my personal experience, this is what I can tell: Using a flat/softer material lace is better. This allows for the lace to hold on the knots. I have laces made of harder material (Nylon types). The knots on these tend to come off when they get wet. Mostly because they don't grip each other. Avoid laces which are cylindrical, they do not hold knots ...


4

With shoes, if I find a pair I like - I wear them for a good 10-15 minutes in the store. Standing up, sitting down, walking, climbing stairs (if possible) - all to get a sense of how they feel doing these different things. If they're painful in the store - they'll be painful everywhere else. There's a thing about feet that isn't necessarily true of any ...


4

The insoles typically are the first thing that gets worn out. Insoles will eventually flatten from the weight of your body. this will then put downward pressure on your arches. Insoles get flattened from use and no longer hold your heel in the correct place. I've had tough and irritating times when my insoles got so flat that, in wet conditions, they would ...


4

You MUST NOT buy hiking boots without trying them on. Period. You want to hike in them - yet there are thousands of different foot forms and accordingly a lot of different boot cuts, differing in a lot more than only the length (which the size describes). There are wide and narrow boots, some with a high bumb under your instep and some with little and so ...


3

A temporary fix I have tried while fishing is to use duct tape. just tape on both sides if the hole and it should hold until you can make some more permanent repairs. To repair damage in a more permanent fashion you can fill the smaller holes with wet-room silicone and then cover the fix with a rubber patch of some description.


3

Put on the gear to test Turn on the shower (adjust temperature to your liking) Walk into the shower Perform a series of movements (walk in place, jumping jacks, etc) Turn off shower Inspect gear for damp spots on the inside This method allows you to control energy exertion (minimize sweat) and exposure time while at the same time simulating "real" ...


2

I find that the best shoelaces are the wide, flat and fairly soft ones - no special plastic coating, just canvas. They stay together the best and can take a lot of punishment. Accidental strong knots are also easier to undo, since it is easier to get a finger behind an edge due to its flatness. The ones on the picture here seem a bit too shiny, so perhaps ...


2

Wash them with a product made for washing leather shoes, like Nikwax Footwear Cleaning Gel. This will remove the crud without damaging the oils in the leather. Then re-waterproof them with a product made for waterproofing leather (e.g. an aqueous wax product). Nikwax also makes some of those. I have used both the cleaner and waterproofer and been happy ...


2

British mountaineer Andy Kirkpatrick has quite a bit of useful information regarding how to look after your feet at altitude and in cold conditions on his website at http://www.andy-kirkpatrick.com/articles/view/how_to_avoid_frostbitten_feet. The only recommendation on footwear size he gives with respect to high altitude, is for Neoprene socks. He ...


2

I know this post is probs a bit late for the original poster. However, I grew up thinking that walking boots had to be worn in and were supposed to be initially uncomfortable for the wearer. Having watched my father hardening his feet in surgical spirits before and after wearing what looked to be hard leathery walking boots, I wasn't looking forward to ever ...


2

Modern boots really don't need a period of breaking in like they used to many years ago. They should be reasonably comfortable as soon as you try them on when buying them. To be honest, it sounds like the boots just don't fit your feet properly. It doesn't matter how good or bad the boots are quality-wise or how much they cost: if they don't fit your feet, ...


2

I'm not saying that you should continue with the break in, but I can say that I bought a pair of Red Wing Boots some month ago, and the break in took a lot longer than what you describe (at least 60 hours of walking I would say) included one "session" as described by berry120 - making them completely wet, and wearing them until they were dry The whole ...


2

You can find some goretex patches that you can use to repair. I fixed a pair of gaiters where crampons opened a whole on the side using one of those patches. I didn't turn up very good but I think it was my job instead of the patch itself. :) Goretex website has some information. I haven't used goretex for a while so I don't know how things are. ...


2

Without having to carry any extra items and thus extra weight, this is what you can do to dry your boots, Gore-tex or otherwise, in the field, in above-freezing temperatures: Prevention: Make every effort to keep your feet dry in the first place. Sometimes it's just inevitable though. Absorb excess water: After removing your insoles, use a highly ...


2

When you buy a new shoe, it's very nice to have one with thermo fitting or foam fitting technology. (Scarpa, Dynafit, black diamond, Fischer, are a few brands that have shoes with this support. What also helps if you have a Powerstrap (Velcro) and/or more than only one or two iron hoop to tight you boot. I've one with 4 and this works very well with my ...


1

Imsodin's answer is good and covers a lot of good points. One thing that is relevant here is Alpine boots come in 3 grades (to match the grades of crampons). You need to pick the right boot grade for the job you want it to do. Some trade off comfort (when walking) for ability when climbing. B1 B1 one boots are softer and allow the most comfort when ...


1

Looks like you have a very limited range of brands over on your island * Beside the brands you already mentioned here are some others that spring to mind: Hanwag Lowa Mammut Salewa Dachstein I know, you're the continent, we're the island ;-) !


1

In my experience, if shoes aren't comfortable when I first put them on in the shop and walk about in them for a few minutes, they are probably never going to be comfortable (or making them comfortable is going to be more trouble than they are worth) so there's no point buying them. I refuse to put up with sore feet because shoes don't fit right - the onus ...


1

If it is consitently a particular area of the foot that is suffering then you could try a trick I was told of a number of years ago. I "suffer" from having very (or in the case of when I went to get a pair of climbing shoes: "stupidly") wide feet. Anyway the trick is to tie knots in the laces at strategic points, this essentially allows you to pull the ...


1

I've had the opposite problem. My feet are very wide from decades of mocassin use. So my ideas might not work. Certainly lacing techniques are worth trying. Normally I don't find these very effective with a low top shoe. One technique however that may work: Lace up the fore foot for comfort, tie a square knot, then lace up the rest of the shoe. When ...


1

Dear Mr. Vitkov, we would rather suggest to proceed in this way: wrinkle with a brush the external part in order to leave out the dirty parts; then you need to take out the Insole and wash the Insole and the internal part of the boot with some detergent; for the external part of the boot, please do not wash using the detergent cos it ...



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