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11

As with clothes you were wearing while you climbed, the liner boots are damp - if not wet from the days activity. Energy is required to evaporate the moisture - this cools you down, including your feet. You get cold from it very easily. Also as most people will feel cold if they have cold feet, so you will feel cold even if you are actually warm enough. In ...


10

A bit of pressure at the top of your foot will not cause any long-term problems, so long as it isn't causing any pain. Boots are designed to hold your foot in place — the snug fit in the midfoot is an important component in keeping your toes from sliding forward when walking downhill or side-to-side when climbing. This additional stability will also reduce ...


7

I am not entirely sure, but I think you are referring to boots like the La Sportiva Nepal. In this case, while these shoes are as you mentioned designed primarerly for technical mountaineering, you should not expect these sort of problems. I did my military service mostly in these boots and we did a lot of marching on flat concrete. While this is a shameful ...


7

My boots are leather, as you've not stated what yours are made of at time of writing, here goes with what I do to clean my boots on walks and to store at home. Firstly for at home I will always leave my boots to dry off usually overnight - just on some newspaper away from any radiators or the fire, slow drying as they are leather. It's easier to remove dry ...


6

The salesperson explained that leather keeps much warmer, but has no effect on breathability or water proof-ness Well he's not really correct there, so breathability is based no the concept that moisture will pass from a high saturation of moisture (next to your skin) to a low saturation of moisture (the outside). The temperature is also important, ...


5

Most insoles are either sized to fit, or cut to fit in your shoes, if your insoles don't fit right then you should probably buy new ones. But first I would question whether or not your new boots are the proper fit. If your insoles are slipping, chances are that you have more room in your shoes than you need, and your foot might slide around with or without ...


5

Goretex does two things well. It's a very light completely windproof layer. Properly cared for it's waterproof. There are many places it's used where it's completely inappropriate and just adds cost. In my experience boots are one of those places. Goretex only "breathes" when there is a significant difference in the moisture content on one side of ...


5

Your best bet for sewing is to use a Speedy Stitcher. The thick gauged thread works really well in boot/shoe repairs and is easy to use. You will be punching holes through the leather which creates potential for water to invade, but the waxy thread helps eliminate this issue. I would finish up with a coat of Sno-Seal, which is a great way to help ...


4

The insoles typically are the first thing that gets worn out. Insoles will eventually flatten from the weight of your body. this will then put downward pressure on your arches. Insoles get flattened from use and no longer hold your heel in the correct place. I've had tough and irritating times when my insoles got so flat that, in wet conditions, they would ...


4

I would say that it is something to avoid. If you notice it now. You will notice it more when your feet swell. Or you get a small foreign body in there. Or your feet get wet. I would recommend continuing to look for a better fit. My (slightly psychological-based argument) is... If you buy them there are 2 mutually exclusive outcomes: The instep ...


3

What nuances are you referring to? If you have an atypical foot shape you of course will be able to get a good fit in a custom-made boot. If it's made by a shoemaker who knows what he is doing it should be a lot more durable too. In contrast the high price. What nuances besides quality (fit, durability) and price are there? Maybe the time it takes to get ...


3

While some brands may be known for narrower boots, this also depends on the last[1] they use for a particular model. La Sportiva boots are often considered to be narrow and low-volume compared to Scarpa, but there are also differences between the lasts they use for their Trango vs. their Nepal lines of boots. (The Nepal last is wider than the Trango.) If ...


2

Using a NON Silicone based spray will keep them waterproof longer. Silicone is not recommended for canvas and gore-tex for waterproofing.


2

Soak feet in salt water. It dries out bottom of feet so blisters don't occur


2

I know this post is probs a bit late for the original poster. However, I grew up thinking that walking boots had to be worn in and were supposed to be initially uncomfortable for the wearer. Having watched my father hardening his feet in surgical spirits before and after wearing what looked to be hard leathery walking boots, I wasn't looking forward to ever ...


2

You can find some goretex patches that you can use to repair. I fixed a pair of gaiters where crampons opened a whole on the side using one of those patches. I didn't turn up very good but I think it was my job instead of the patch itself. :) Goretex website has some information. I haven't used goretex for a while so I don't know how things are. ...


2

When you buy a new shoe, it's very nice to have one with thermo fitting or foam fitting technology. (Scarpa, Dynafit, black diamond, Fischer, are a few brands that have shoes with this support. What also helps if you have a Powerstrap (Velcro) and/or more than only one or two iron hoop to tight you boot. I've one with 4 and this works very well with my ...


2

Good luck in your quest to find a well-fitting boot - I never managed it. So I'm going to suggest an alternative approach. Outside of technical snow and ice, more and more walkers are abandoning boots altogether in favour of trail shoes and sandals. And for good reason. I used boots for decades and could never get a good fit: the idea of encasing your foot ...


1

You're sleeping bag only works if you can get it warm. If you wear too many clothes in your sleeping bag, you're not going to fill the loft of your expensive down mummy with cozy warm body heat. This is what can happen if you're wearing your liners in bed, the bag around your feet doesn't warm up. I think whether or not you get cold toes depends a lot on ...


1

I have a similar problem with two great pairs of waterproof leather boots, with seams un-stitching alongside the ball of the foot. GearAid Freesole is a tough flexible urethane repair highly recommended to re-bond the leather seams tightly instead of trying to sew them. A tube of this was 6.50 CAD at MEC.


1

Imsodin's answer is good and covers a lot of good points. One thing that is relevant here is Alpine boots come in 3 grades (to match the grades of crampons). You need to pick the right boot grade for the job you want it to do. Some trade off comfort (when walking) for ability when climbing. B1 B1 one boots are softer and allow the most comfort when ...


1

Looks like you have a very limited range of brands over on your island * Beside the brands you already mentioned here are some others that spring to mind: Hanwag Lowa Mammut Salewa Dachstein I know, you're the continent, we're the island ;-) !


1

Cut a pair of socks in half! Cut across about two inches above where the toes would be. Then slide these over the top of your boots. Works for me! :)


1

Having various long hiking experience I find the following seems to help reduce blistering: Toe socks .. big help. Stopping and changing socks OFTEN or as soon as tehre is any burn feeling. This is the biggest thing. As soon as you sense friction STOP and deal with it. Let feet cool and dry and change socks at least. Use Band Aid blister pads. ...


1

Get the best fit possible. Then go with the soak them and walk them dry method. Wetting the leather softens it and as it drys the leather shrinks to your foot shape. And at the first sign of blisters stand in a stream. Removes heat and lubricates the area.



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