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17

They protect the paws from injury or already injured paws from getting worse (and having bandages ripped off). Things they protect from include: rough terrain - sharp rocks, etc. chemicals like salt used for de-icing roads extreme cold ice balls forming between the dog's toes.


12

These boots are designed for a few purposes actually. Firstly, dogs paws can be affected by snow and ice - especially in breeds or dogs unused to colder climates. The boots help protect their paws from the colder temperatures, and also help prevent the build up of snow on their paw hair - which can then clump and freeze and cause irritation for the dog. ...


8

Most insoles are either sized to fit, or cut to fit in your shoes, if your insoles don't fit right then you should probably buy new ones. But first I would question whether or not your new boots are the proper fit. If your insoles are slipping, chances are that you have more room in your shoes than you need, and your foot might slide around with or without ...


7

Hiking boots definitely must be bought a size larger than your everyday shoes. The space in front of the toe is essentially a requirement. Your feet swells considerably during a strenuous hike. Do not underestimate this. On a steep downhill you don't want your toes to push against the front of the boot, and essentially carrying your weight. (Even so ...


5

The main issue with boot fit around the toe area is your toes pressing against the ends or the top. Typically you want the "toe box" to be quite roomy to allow free movement of your toes when you foot lifts and you apply pressure though your toes. So the main problem most people have is there toes being too near the end. Your obviously not having that ...


4

From your verbal description, it sounds like a perfect fit.


3

Advise such as this is aim at the less informed and suits the majority of people most of the time. You have a solution that works for you, don't feel compelled to change it because someone who you never met, who has never put your feet into your boots tells you its better. It sounds like you boot are too small and wrong shape for you to wear thick socks, ...


3

Fishermen use felt soled wading boots for wading through creeks and rivers on the slippery rocks, they give you the friction you need without damaging the surface you're walking on. They would work just as well on a slippery dock. You can buy them at any fishing store.


3

I would treat this exactly like walking on ice: use the penguin technique, i.e. always keep your center of mass above your feet and take small slow steps. Also see What's the best way to avoid slipping on ice?


3

Soak feet in salt water. It dries out bottom of feet so blisters don't occur


3

That sounds very strange to me- the leather itself seems like the last thing that would be letting water through, especially if treated with waterproofing products. My immediate thought would be to look at the stitching, including the tongue and gussets. How many pieces make up the uppers? If it's more than one, check those seams as well. Do you notice ...


2

Greetings fellow canadian. I too have had to ensure my toes stay dry while snowshoeing to work or hunting polar bears in the hinterlands of toronto. you mentioned goretex liners. If thats the case, and you bought them through a real outlet, not a vintage store/ebay/whatever. contact goretex directly and theyll set it right. seriously. Otherwise there are 2 ...


2

Synthetic leather is literally "knock-off" leather, never is synthetic preferred to the real thing unless you are cost oriented, or vegan. Synthetic boots also tend to be made out of lots of pieces of synthetic leather, stitched together with other types of materials in the uppers in fancy patterns, which leaves them vulnerable to being penetrated by water. ...


2

Having various long hiking experience I find the following seems to help reduce blistering: Toe socks .. big help. Stopping and changing socks OFTEN or as soon as tehre is any burn feeling. This is the biggest thing. As soon as you sense friction STOP and deal with it. Let feet cool and dry and change socks at least. Use Band Aid blister pads. ...


2

Again, how tight is too tight? Probably something that doesn't come off while walking in tall grass, but does come off quick when you want it to, also fast to tie up again is the knot you are looking for. I usually prefer Ian's Secure knot. Such a brilliant link! There is a pair of shoes which have a slightly longer laces which I deliberately didnt ...


1

"Cushioning" can be better achieved with an insole designed for that specific purpose. Since almost all hiking boots allow you to swap insoles, there is no reason to get socks for "cushion". Cushioning also doesn't really help with blisters (though this is hotly debated as you can see here). Thicker socks will help with warmth but there are also other ...


1

The most important things are: Do what works for you. Try boots with the type of socks you intend to wear them with. Sock weight can be used for fine tuning even once you've bought the boots but these two points are critical. You may find that the "better" socks (with padded weight-bearing sections) are worse for you than cheaper hiking socks with a ...


1

Ultimately, it comes down to personal preference. There are many people with "large, wide, and flat feet", and every one of them has a different idea of what "comfortable" means to them. For example, some people like heavily insulated shoes, while others hate it. Thus, while materials and construction can change the level of insulation (or other physical ...


1

When they are tight enough to prevent movement within the shoe/boot but not so tight that it causes discomfort. A little too loose is actually worse than a lot too loose. A little too loose will guarantee a blister, while a lot too loose will reduce your ankle support.


1

The special tread for walking on slippery wood is called caulk boots or cork boots. They have spikes that give good traction on wet wood.


1

Mink oil or Sno seal are two brands I've had good results with. Preheating the boots with a hair dryer to open the pores is essential for either product.Hit the seams and inside bends first then just rub in a good coating all over and wait for it to soak in. Repeat if required.


1

When I was in the British Army, the officially recommended way to soften new leather boots and to keep them waterproof was to fill them with cooking oil and leave for it to soak through the leather (some will eventually ooze out, so don't leave them on the carpet). You can drain the oil and store for future reproofing. Your socks might smell like ...



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