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16

I am not sure about the being able to feel more, but the most important reason I don't use socks is to avoid the rock boot sliding on my foot. If you are on a marginal grip using just the edge of your sole, you don't want the boot to move at all. This is also one of the reasons that rock boots for more experienced climbers are much more rigid than those ...


15

This might sound a bit daft - but you could be holding on to the rock too tightly. Your other questions indicate you might be pretty new to climbing, and it is common for beginners to make this mistake. Primarily, you should be climbing with your legs - pushing your weight up. Legs are used to your weight - arms, and fingertips, are not. If you are steady ...


15

Here are a couple Climb on your Skeleton Overhanging climbing is hard work and tiring. You need to reduce the stress on your muscles by letting your skeleton hold as much of your body weight as possible. Keep your arms straight and your muscles relaxed, don't try and hold yourself against the face. Pull only when you need to pull Use your shoulders/Twist ...


11

I too prefer good old magnesium carbonate. My favorite is the block form (I haven't noticed a difference between brands), which usually can be found for a better price if you look through retailers who market to gymnasts rather than climbers. I'll list below the different kinds of chalk and grip aids that I have experience with and the merits/demerits of ...


11

I've been bouldering outdoors for a couple years now and let me ask you this question in return: Why wear socks in your climbing shoes? What is the possible benefit to wearing socks? Try it. Your shoes will still stink, I guarantee. Your feet run the risk of slipping around in your climbing shoes. And if you buy tight, aggressive shoes, the fit will go all ...


10

The best ways I found to improve foot work are the following: Climb routes which are less than vertical (slabs are great) I know this sounds obvious, but seriously, just climb slabs and low angle for a few weeks (or months). Focus on your feet, don't use your hands if possible. Practice stepping up only, don't pull on holds Play a game with your ...


9

Oh friend, I have been down this miserable road just like you. I'll tell you what's at the end of it: swelling of the synovial fluid in the finger joints (which if not reduced leads to arthritis), bone spurs in the knuckles, and a year off the rock. Here's the good news, though: I'm happily climbing again and my fingers don't hurt! The finger joint pain ...


8

With due respect to Ben Crowell, who is I believe a far more experienced outdoorsman than I am, I beg to differ with his answer. (Edit: prior to revision that is.) Having worked at a very small climbing wall I have seen tough ropes completely worn out by top-rope climbing alone, therefore at least in the extreme "Ropes don't become weak from top-roping or ...


8

Here are some features to keep in mind when buying climbing shoes once you're past the beginner phase: Downturned: Most beginner shoes are pretty flat, which are fine for mainly vertical walls. However, as you climb harder stuff on overhanging walls, it's helpful to have downturned shoes for maintaining a hook-like foot shape. This allows you to hook your ...


8

Shoes and a harness. Some places don't have belay devices or carabiners attached to each rope, so check on that beforehand, as you may need to provide your own. That's it. Chalk and a chalk bag is something you'll probably want pretty quickly and often comes packaged with the harness. For climbing shoes, look for something comfortable to wear for a ...


6

As I noted in my answer to that question, plasticene or stress balls work. Also, you can use guitarist's finger exercisers I do like your idea of using less fingers for carrying bags etc.


6

The mistakes I mention might be more common at lower grades than yours, here goes anyway: Too big steps. When I started climbing I tended to make massive steps, leaving out many good footholds in between. A more experienced friend taught me to avoid this by clipping a quickdraw between my climbing shoes on a toprope climb well within my ability; suddenly I ...


6

Good footwork is the foundation to good climbing. Most climbers think their footwork is better than it actually is, and could be better climbers simply by improving their footwork. Here are some drills and tips to improve it: Quiet feet: By far the best drill you can do is called quiet feet. It involves climbing while focusing your attention on your ...


6

The best practice for climbing is to actually go climbing. I have wasted both time and money experimenting with training setups at home for practicing climbing, and I have mostly been disappointed. Since then I have transitioned my efforts at home to staying in shape for climbing (slightly different from what you are asking.) Unless you want to spend ...


6

Unlike others, I think the route is pretty well described. There's basically a lot of flat, useable feet and a lot of flat crimp holds that are roughly 1/2 cm thick on a 90-degree wall. I think the grade depends on an accurate measurement of the crimp width--the grade could change +/-1 V grade if the thickness changes just by a couple mm. It also could ...


6

The best single tip I got when I started bouldering (especially overhangs) is If you are reaching for the next hold with your right hand, keep most of the weight on your right foot. If you are reaching with your left hand, keep most of the weight on your left foot. This is to prevent barn-dooring. In fact, taking the other foot off a hold will often ...


5

This question has some information about when to retire a rope. The core of a rope doesn't become weak from top-roping or from sustaining lead falls with a small fall factor. It becomes weak from sustaining multiple lead falls with very large fall factors, approaching 2. The only way to get a fall factor greater than 1 is if you fall past your belay station ...


5

Rest? Sometimes this kind of pain can be a sign of overtraining. In the question, the poster doesn't say how frequently he climbs, or how long he's been climbing, so its hard to formulate an exact recommendation. If you're just feeling a tremendous amount of lower-grade soreness, try reducing the numbers of days a week you climb. I have friends that ...


5

Every layer between your feet and the ground (or hill or whatever you are climbing) adds some distance resulting in: - less balance - less 'feel' with the type of material you are climbing - you feel ditches/gaps/small stones better (depends on how thick your shoes are) Also you might be able to have smaller (less wide) shoes making it easier to place a ...


5

a common footwork mistake is not keeping it still! I see this all the time with people starting in bouldering, their footwork can be indecisive. You need to pick how and where you want to place your foot and do it. Don't keep moving it around, unless you plan to do this. Use the correct parts of your foot/shoe. You want to only use the outside/indside ...


5

Firstly, warm up neatly, and Try to move through the overhang. Visualize the moves and flow through them. If you stop it's hard to get moving again. Use your whole body. It's easy to get good hands and try and pull yourself up. If you observe good climbers on overhanging problems or routes you will likely notice that they continually twist and turn, ...


4

Because you want to increase your chances of contracting nail fungus or athlete's foot from your rental shoes :) In other words, it's probably better to keep the socks on if you're renting shoes.


4

If you are into sport climbing, Thailand has got to be the place. Specifically, check out Krabi or Railay, also anywhere that offers deep water soloing. The downside to Thailand is that you'll spend half the year looking for rock that isn't wet (i.e. during rainy season).


4

Whilst walking about, clench your fist, then stretch your hand open again. repeat this 30 times (or whatever you want) and relax. Bit by but, maybe one or two a day, increase the reps. Vary for speed and power. You can do this whilst walking around.


4

Where does the route setter know from which movements capabilities and skills are assigned to each grade? He doesn't. Skills != grade. Grade is equal to difficulty. Are there some general catalogues / guidelines which movements or skills are necessary to master a certain grade? No, grading is a subjective process. It's more art than science. ...


4

Generally speaking, the main differences between bouldering and top roping (unless you are an expert) is that you are likely to find yourself trying more extreme positions when bouldering. Huge generalisation, I know, but when top roping you usually look to conserve energy, assess the pitch, and make vertical gains. As a boulderer, you will be crabbing, ...


4

It doesn't really go away with time. At least not for me - when I'm on a hard gym route I tend to ignore any holds that are "off" for that route, and every now and then I'll hit one with an elbow or knee. Also outside, while you want to emphasize using your feet, ever now and then you'll find yourself needing to place a knee on a hold. Working on ...


3

Generally, a more controlled and precise technique should reduce undesired knee scraping and banging... But I find that the ability to achieve this precision is, at least to some degree, dependent on your strength reserves, and decreases during a session. Often, several hours into a climbing session I find myself making bigger and less precise moves, and ...


3

Holding on to crimpers is what causes pain in my finger-joints. This is from the Metolius website where they give instructions for hang-board training: "Avoid using crimp or cling grips. A very important aspect concerning any hold is how you hold on to it. It is extremely important that you do not use any kind of cling technique regularly." I have ...


3

I believe it is mostly a matter of taste. Many people claim that going barefoot inside the climbing shoes allows you to feel a bit more of the surface than with socks. Granted, you can't feel much through the thick rubber of the shoes to begin with, but I can see how that would be true. Others counter claim that socks make your shoes less stinky after a ...



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