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18

Here are a couple Climb on your Skeleton Overhanging climbing is hard work and tiring. You need to reduce the stress on your muscles by letting your skeleton hold as much of your body weight as possible. Keep your arms straight and your muscles relaxed, don't try and hold yourself against the face. Pull only when you need to pull Use your shoulders/Twist ...


12

As a disclaimer I'm 6'3" so this isn't from experience! As a tall climber you're correct, I have a lot of advantages. Reach can be very advantageous, especially on bouldering. In my experience the disadvantages of me being tall (therefore the advantages of being shorter!) are: I have a longer reach but I also have longer levers. This means I find certain ...


8

With due respect to Ben Crowell, who is I believe a far more experienced outdoorsman than I am, I beg to differ with his answer. (Edit: prior to revision that is.) Having worked at a very small climbing wall I have seen tough ropes completely worn out by top-rope climbing alone, therefore at least in the extreme "Ropes don't become weak from top-roping or ...


8

Here are some features to keep in mind when buying climbing shoes once you're past the beginner phase: Downturned: Most beginner shoes are pretty flat, which are fine for mainly vertical walls. However, as you climb harder stuff on overhanging walls, it's helpful to have downturned shoes for maintaining a hook-like foot shape. This allows you to hook your ...


8

I am not a very good climber as such, and I am 5'7" only. I think I am dwarf enough to put in my experiences here: As you rightly said, being short can be very frustrating when you don't get to access a specific hold. There are a few techniques that might help a short climber do amazingly well. Realize that you may not be able to do exactly the same ...


8

The best single tip I got when I started bouldering (especially overhangs) is If you are reaching for the next hold with your right hand, keep most of the weight on your right foot. If you are reaching with your left hand, keep most of the weight on your left foot. This is to prevent barn-dooring. In fact, taking the other foot off a hold will often ...


7

Firstly, warm up neatly, and Try to move through the overhang. Visualize the moves and flow through them. If you stop it's hard to get moving again. Use your whole body. It's easy to get good hands and try and pull yourself up. If you observe good climbers on overhanging problems or routes you will likely notice that they continually twist and turn, ...


6

Unlike others, I think the route is pretty well described. There's basically a lot of flat, useable feet and a lot of flat crimp holds that are roughly 1/2 cm thick on a 90-degree wall. I think the grade depends on an accurate measurement of the crimp width--the grade could change +/-1 V grade if the thickness changes just by a couple mm. It also could ...


6

The mistakes I mention might be more common at lower grades than yours, here goes anyway: Too big steps. When I started climbing I tended to make massive steps, leaving out many good footholds in between. A more experienced friend taught me to avoid this by clipping a quickdraw between my climbing shoes on a toprope climb well within my ability; suddenly I ...


5

a common footwork mistake is not keeping it still! I see this all the time with people starting in bouldering, their footwork can be indecisive. You need to pick how and where you want to place your foot and do it. Don't keep moving it around, unless you plan to do this. Use the correct parts of your foot/shoe. You want to only use the outside/indside ...


5

This question has some information about when to retire a rope. The core of a rope doesn't become weak from top-roping or from sustaining lead falls with a small fall factor. It becomes weak from sustaining multiple lead falls with very large fall factors, approaching 2. The only way to get a fall factor greater than 1 is if you fall past your belay station ...


4

Where does the route setter know from which movements capabilities and skills are assigned to each grade? He doesn't. Skills != grade. Grade is equal to difficulty. Are there some general catalogues / guidelines which movements or skills are necessary to master a certain grade? No, grading is a subjective process. It's more art than science. ...


4

Because you want to increase your chances of contracting nail fungus or athlete's foot from your rental shoes :) In other words, it's probably better to keep the socks on if you're renting shoes.


2

I would suggest core strength is more the problem than leg strength, if you notice it specifically on overhangs. On a slab, your legs are doing most (or sometimes all) of the pushing, while minimal weight is on your hands for balance. As it gets steeper more of your weight will always be on your hands, but the stronger your core is the more you can keep ...


2

They are all very similar. I've attempted to summarise below: Chalk Pure natural calcium carbonate, nothing else. Advantages: It's natural, it doesn't dry your hands out (as much), you're not going to leave chemicals on holds and it'll wash off without leaving a trace, cheap Disadvantage: It can get a bit sticky and gritty on your hands, needs replacing ...


2

Find yourself a good deep tissue massage therapist who specializes in things like carpal tunnel, tennis elbow, and thoracic outlet syndrome; someone who knows the muscles well enough to address these concerns will know the muscles well enough to massage the muscles of a climber. Just be prepared for to hurt a bit; just like every other muscle, the tiny ...


1

Not mentioned yet: shorter people probably have smaller hands, hence shorter fingers. Shorter fingers have more crimp strength. If you've ever climbed past a V1, you know that is very, very important.


1

As I wrote above, it's hard to rate this wall. But you can challenge yourself and mark some routes on the wall with colored tape, and then you can also see a progress in your climbing, or you can leave a given hold and try to go to the next, or do it dynamically, or use not all your fingers to hold. I have a selfmade boulderwall in our house and that is ...


1

There is a technique to topping out a flat featureless boulder gracefully. Climbing.com have a good article on it Briefly this is: Step one. When you reach the lip of a boulder, quickly evaluate which foot to swing up onto the lip (from now on this foot will be known as the pivot foot). Let gravity work for you by swinging your pivot foot onto ...



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