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18

Here are a couple Climb on your Skeleton Overhanging climbing is hard work and tiring. You need to reduce the stress on your muscles by letting your skeleton hold as much of your body weight as possible. Keep your arms straight and your muscles relaxed, don't try and hold yourself against the face. Pull only when you need to pull Use your shoulders/Twist ...


17

As a disclaimer I'm 6'3" so this isn't from experience! As a tall climber you're correct, I have a lot of advantages. Reach can be very advantageous, especially on bouldering. In my experience the disadvantages of me being tall (therefore the advantages of being shorter!) are: I have a longer reach but I also have longer levers. This means I find certain ...


11

Yes, shoe size plays a role which is quite important. But for beginners I would suggest to think more about foot technique than caring about the best possible gear. For climbing shoe sizes I give the following simple hints: choose the shoes as small as possible choose shoes which aren't causing ache of the foot/toes/nail/heel climbing rubber shoes will ...


11

Have you ever done any weight training? This kind of "delayed onset muscle soreness" is very common for people beginning a weight training program. This wikipedia page attempts to explain the mechanism. For weight training, the general advice is to not stop lifting, but to reduce the weight and intensity. If you google "delay onset muscle soreness" ...


10

Here are some features to keep in mind when buying climbing shoes once you're past the beginner phase: Downturned: Most beginner shoes are pretty flat, which are fine for mainly vertical walls. However, as you climb harder stuff on overhanging walls, it's helpful to have downturned shoes for maintaining a hook-like foot shape. This allows you to hook your ...


10

I am not a very good climber as such, and I am 5'7" only. I think I am dwarf enough to put in my experiences here: As you rightly said, being short can be very frustrating when you don't get to access a specific hold. There are a few techniques that might help a short climber do amazingly well. Realize that you may not be able to do exactly the same ...


9

All of the above are styles of rock climbing. The differences/similarities are highlighted below: Bouldering Low-level climbing (usually up to about 3m) without the use of a rope. Falls are typically protected against by the use of large portable mats (bouldering mats). Concentrates on technically difficult short climbs. Usually (though not exclusively) ...


8

The best single tip I got when I started bouldering (especially overhangs) is If you are reaching for the next hold with your right hand, keep most of the weight on your right foot. If you are reaching with your left hand, keep most of the weight on your left foot. This is to prevent barn-dooring. In fact, taking the other foot off a hold will often ...


7

Firstly, warm up neatly, and Try to move through the overhang. Visualize the moves and flow through them. If you stop it's hard to get moving again. Use your whole body. It's easy to get good hands and try and pull yourself up. If you observe good climbers on overhanging problems or routes you will likely notice that they continually twist and turn, ...


6

I have to disagree with the above answer about rotator cuff problems. It is a good idea to strengthen your rotator cuffs for various reasons, but to me this does just sound like Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness. Any type of high intensity exercise where you put strain on your muscles is likely to cause the same thing. I get delayed soreness (which always seems ...


6

Not much advantage being a short climber to be honest.I'm probably the shortest around, I'm 5'1" male @ 120lbs and getting stronger in my mid 30's. I can solve most problems, but not all reachy problems with no intermediates. Be creative all the most, no different than your daily life. Its what life has brought to me is to think outside the box. Sometimes ...


6

Unlike others, I think the route is pretty well described. There's basically a lot of flat, useable feet and a lot of flat crimp holds that are roughly 1/2 cm thick on a 90-degree wall. I think the grade depends on an accurate measurement of the crimp width--the grade could change +/-1 V grade if the thickness changes just by a couple mm. It also could ...


6

The mistakes I mention might be more common at lower grades than yours, here goes anyway: Too big steps. When I started climbing I tended to make massive steps, leaving out many good footholds in between. A more experienced friend taught me to avoid this by clipping a quickdraw between my climbing shoes on a toprope climb well within my ability; suddenly I ...


5

a common footwork mistake is not keeping it still! I see this all the time with people starting in bouldering, their footwork can be indecisive. You need to pick how and where you want to place your foot and do it. Don't keep moving it around, unless you plan to do this. Use the correct parts of your foot/shoe. You want to only use the outside/indside ...


5

I climb in vibram five-fingers (KSO's), climbed in them for the first time in 2008 and loved them, where they excel is in roofs and overhanging problems because you can hook holds a lot easier with your toes, but for tougher wall climbing with small features (5.11+) I still use climbing shoes. There are some gyms that allow climbing barefoot, but for the ...


5

As the comments have mentioned, grades vary somewhat between gyms, but I think you can still provide some rough guidelines. Peg boards can probably be done by anyone at any climbing level. You're not stressing your fingers really, so there's little chance of injury. It's essentially like practicing pull-ups. It probably won't help your climbing too much ...


4

As a girl 167cm tall (5'7") I'm on a shorter side of climbers spectra. I believe that while sometimes not being able to reach a hold can mean a no-go on a route, there is plenty of situations where being short gives you the edge: Shorter body means shorter levers. This comes handy in steep overhangs and in any other situation that requires a lot of body ...


4

Where does the route setter know from which movements capabilities and skills are assigned to each grade? He doesn't. Skills != grade. Grade is equal to difficulty. Are there some general catalogues / guidelines which movements or skills are necessary to master a certain grade? No, grading is a subjective process. It's more art than science. ...


3

I would suggest core strength is more the problem than leg strength, if you notice it specifically on overhangs. On a slab, your legs are doing most (or sometimes all) of the pushing, while minimal weight is on your hands for balance. As it gets steeper more of your weight will always be on your hands, but the stronger your core is the more you can keep ...


3

Find yourself a good deep tissue massage therapist who specializes in things like carpal tunnel, tennis elbow, and thoracic outlet syndrome; someone who knows the muscles well enough to address these concerns will know the muscles well enough to massage the muscles of a climber. Just be prepared for to hurt a bit; just like every other muscle, the tiny ...


3

They are all very similar. I've attempted to summarise below: Chalk Pure natural calcium carbonate, nothing else. Advantages: It's natural, it doesn't dry your hands out (as much), you're not going to leave chemicals on holds and it'll wash off without leaving a trace, cheap Disadvantage: It can get a bit sticky and gritty on your hands, needs replacing ...


3

That sounds like a rotator cuff problem to me. It's a common problem that I see amongst my climbing friends and I experience myself. Usual symptoms are soreness in the elbow join/lower bicep, sometimes causing carpal tunnel pain, sometimes causing more extreme shoulder pain, sometimes even limiting movement. My understanding is that we overuse the big ...


3

Feet and fit are very personal and shoes are no substitute for good technique and strength. How should I choose the proper size of my climbing shoes? I think the best thing you could do would be to borrow a smaller pair from a friend next time you go climbing (or rent a pair) and see what works best for you. some general guidelines; Not being able ...


2

Aside from the excellent answer by Michael Borgwandt, I have to add that a climbing shoe isn't just there for better gripping. Just like any other shoe, it also protects your feet from any sharp objects or rough surfaces that you may encounter along your trip. The more widely used paths have probably been worn down, but if you're on a new path, it is likely ...


2

One thing is that I doubt it's possible to train the toes to have significant strength; unlike the fingers, they are simply not built for that job. And most of the time, you have a lot more weight on your feet than on your hands. Injury and strain would be a big problem. Then there's the sweating: there's actually more sweat glands in your soles than ...


2

There probably is a point where not having a toe-crunched fit would make a difference, but it's not V3. Climbing shoes do wear out relatively quickly. The difference in the sharpness of the rubber edge between a newly soled shoe and worn shoe can make a difference on small holds. Your climbing gym likely has a referral for getting climbing shoes re-soled. ...


2

Not mentioned yet: shorter people probably have smaller hands, hence shorter fingers. Shorter fingers have more crimp strength. If you've ever climbed past a V1, you know that is very, very important.


2

Yes, stop climbing. You're connective tissues are not ready for it. Active rest (easy climbing/easy training) and rehab/prehab for your fingers, wrists, forearms, and upper body in general will help. Look at it this way, however long you have had the injury/been feeling pain, you will need to rest and rehab your joints/connective tissue for the same amount ...


1

For a novice, momentum, and fear of falling, matter more here than in most things you'll do on the wall. Statically reaching on an overhang is very intense. Use your legs (generally) to push/propel yourself up. If you keep your arms straight you should move throw the arc like a pendulum and grab effectively. But the next trick is to remember to pull with ...


1

As I wrote above, it's hard to rate this wall. But you can challenge yourself and mark some routes on the wall with colored tape, and then you can also see a progress in your climbing, or you can leave a given hold and try to go to the next, or do it dynamically, or use not all your fingers to hold. I have a selfmade boulderwall in our house and that is ...



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