Hot answers tagged

17

Basically, "spotting" someone means making sure that they safely land on the pad with their feet first to prevent injuries in case of a fall. This means several distinct tasks: Moving a falling climber to the pad: try to guide them towards the pad, ideally by pushing at the hips or shoulders. Don't try to catch them (which includes not standing directly ...


16

The job of a spotter is to prevent the climber from landing on their head and (if possible) ensure they land on their feet and on the crashpad. This may involve moving the crashpad (which should coincide with the climber having a secure hold or position. The job of a spotter is not to "catch" the climber! That's something they're simply not going to be able ...


12

Climbing next to a road is, in general, not a pleasant experience. Any roadside rock face is artificially shaped by the excavation that created it. The rock can be more likely to crumble under you as you climb than naturally exposed rock, and it is likely to be dirty from dust kicked up by passing traffic. You may think that dirt is a silly complaint, but it ...


11

I'm a very static climber, but back in the day I was one of those climbing cave rats who campused and dyno'd his way through as much of a problem as he could. The key to becoming a more static climber, is to learn more technique and balance. I learned how to be a static climber from bouldering. You can learn a lot from reading a book, or watching some ...


10

Before the climb As @ShemSeger suggests, most of the work is to be done before the climb itself. You need to stay warm belaying your partner and waiting to climb yourself - if your hands and feet are cold beforehand, it will be hard to warm them up when they are in contact with cold stone. What you can do is: Keep your core warm by wearing warm clothes - ...


8

Fall More. If you're not falling a lot, then you're not pushing yourself enough, ergo you won't see much improvement. Grasping a basic understanding of proper climbing technique is what enables most new climbers to quickly advance in their climbing abilities, but once you have that understanding of climbing principles, then your limitations are mostly ...


8

This is more likely than not, related to two things: Your balance Your core strength Those two things are related. I can't find the reference but Sonnie Trotter once said: Climbing is three things: Strong fingers, strong mind, strong core. I would recommend improving your core strength as this will certainly improve your balance. This will also ...


8

Short answer: Climb lots of other routes in many different areas and have lots of other people climb your routes. Let me get into why you opened a can of worms with your question: Ratings for routes are almost always in a greater context both historically and in respect to their location. The people who created the Yosemite Decimal System for example had ...


8

Having your muscles "pumped" is not a problem in itself. If you have problems with movement because of it, it is most likely down to muscle type, muscle mass, and cardiovascular effectiveness. Because I used to do a lot of weight lifting, my muscle mass is pretty high (which actually gives me a poor power to weight ratio for climbing) but as I do a lot of ...


7

This answer is specific to the US interstate highway system The vast majority of this system is closed to pedestrian (and bicycle) traffic. These are dangerous roads to be on; on average 600+ pedestrians die each year on them While there are many place (namely the state of Oregon) where walking on the Interstates is not illegal, it is in most areas of the ...


7

Warm Your Core! One thing all climbers have in common, is a big poofy down jacket. Your fingers are only going to be as warm as your core is, so keep your core warm, and that nice warm blood will circulate to your fingers. Only take your jacket off when it's your turn to climb. For extra warmth, drink hot chocolate while you're wearing your poofy jacket ...


7

Ah the Endurance problem. Well this can either boil down to Power Endurance or just normal Endurance. Power Endurance is where you can retain a high level of power through a pump. This exceeds your endurance by seconds. Normal Endurance is the ability to climb at a lower level for longer. This exceeds your endurance by minutes. For your case, it sounds like ...


5

Others have discussed strength training/conditioning/physiology, and remediation techniques like cool water baths. There are two aggrevating factors that haven't been addressed: Bad Technique If you use good technique then you will support the maximum amount of your weight with your leg muscles. The obvious benefit of supporting more weight with your legs ...


5

Okay, I'm 5'4" and female. I have small hands and feet, and am very flexible. For my fellow short people, the best advice I got is from this very helpful website from Tiffany: http://blicard.com/blogs/news/15333515-tiffanys-climbing-tips-for-short-people And, cross train with yoga. Tall people have a harder time touching your toes. But if you can touch your ...


4

I'll chime in from a fairly unique position with anecdotal evidence only. I feel like most of the advice you'll get is from experts that talk down to you condescendingly if you even mention the b-word. I'll describe my scenario and you can interpret it however you wish. I have been wearing minimalist 'barefoot' type shoes casually since probably earlier ...


4

Put Heat Warmers in your climbing shoes and in your gloves, put a big puffy on. Jumping jacks, lots of jumping jacks, get your heart rate up and get your blood flowing and warmed up. Climb, the first climb is always the worst! Keep a heat pack in your chalk bag. You'll freeze on the wall but when you get down you'll be hot! Immediately throw on your ...


4

It's not illegal in Montana, in fact the road side crags at Stonehill near Rexford Bench are some of the best, and most popular sport climbs in NW Montana (for Canadians at least): Roadside crags are what sport climbers live for, as long as there's enough room in the ditch to belay safely off of the road, then you're good to go.


4

I have no special knowledge of this subject but it is my understanding that rock cut by blasting fractures deeply, beyond the part that is removed, and that as a result climbing on such rock is typically not safe as entire blocks are liable to come loose. A bolt is worse than no good if it pulls a boulder down on top of you, and trad pro, especially cams, ...


3

The main problems caused by onesided training are reduced movement range, bad posture and lack of stability (which increases the risk of acute injuries). Anyone who has done any kind of intense sport knows how regular, harmless muscle soreness feels. You should worry when it doesn't go away or gets worse rather than better after more training, or when it ...


3

When you say short, I'm assuming your girlfriend is probably about my height which is 5'0. I boulder with my boyfriend who is about 6'. It is very frustrating watching a taller person walk in front of me and effortlessly reach a problem that I was just popping a vein to reach. As a shorter person, we will be forced to learn better technique, flexibility ...


3

To complement the other answers, I'd recommend drills and climbing with handicaps. If you're climbing a route that's normally very doable, try it with a few variations: quiet feet (using footholds shouldn't make any sounds) hovering hands (before putting your hand on a hold, you have to keep it there without touching it for 3 seconds) skipped moves (don't ...


3

If you are in the V0-V2 range, the sure-fire way to get better is to climb with more volume and intensity. Here are some practical things you can do: Work your way up to be able to climb 3x a week (a day rest in-between). When first starting out, you may need 2 or 3 days to recover. Try to climb enough in a session so that your forearms are pumped and you ...


2

I don't do any climbing but, as therapist, one suggestion I would give to you is cold rinses, (edit: cold if you do things yourself, to be conservative, a therapist would use ice, unless you know how to use it properly limit things to cool or cold) between if possible and after. A rinse wont cool your muscles down, after the exercise you could go on even ...


2

Look at the average heights of the worlds top climbers and very few of them are over 6ft tall. Being tall is an advantage when you start climbing but the harder it gets and the smaller the hand/foot holds get the more advantage there is to being small and light. I'm 6'2" and weight 85kg so moves with high feet push my weight further away from the wall than ...



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