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12

Sulfur is often suggested for natural mosquito repellents. I've seen recommendations for taking sulfur pills, making sulfur creams, or applying sulfur powders. According to the Colorado State University Extension, the sulfur content of cloves is the science behind garlic-based repellents or recommendations to consume garlic. That said, I would not think ...


9

Besides DEET, the CDC lists: Picaridin (Cutter Advanced, Skin So Soft Bug Guard Plus, and Autan (outside the United States)) Lemon Eucalyptus oil (PMD)** (no examples given) IR3535 (Skin So Soft Bug Guard Plus Expedition) In particular, Picaridin seems to be a viable alternative: Of the active ingredients registered with the EPA, CDC believes that ...


7

CO2 traps, according to the NIH, fare better than most other types of mosquito traps. For best results, you want to use a trap with counterflow technology (CFG). Note that you have to keep your "scent" down or it will overwhelm the CO2. Traps baited only with light or octenol caught few mosquitoes, whereas many were caught by traps baited with CO2 ...


5

Yes, deer will smell your bug spray. Even if you use all the fancy scent-eliminating sprays, soaps, and clothing detergents they can still smell you if you are sweaty. Most important is the wind factor: Deer will smell you if they are downwind of you. NRA hunting advice for first-time deer hunters: http://www.nrainsights.org/Five_Things_fs.php. I would ...


5

You are likely talking about eye flies. They feed on lachrymal secretion which your eyes produce. When they get too intense, if hiking, I either walk faster and away from wet area or use a good head net. Peter Vacco have good information on flies and also happen to make really good head nets.


4

I used to think I knew the answer to this, from having a couple of very small leeches, but this guidance from wildmadagascar.com is quite comprehensive: Identify the anterior (oral) sucker which will be found at the small end of the leech.Put your finger on your skin adjacent to the oral sucker Gently but firmly slide your finger toward the wound where the ...


3

There are several things that supposedly reduce the pain - if you have any baking soda with you (sounds silly but if you frequently get stung it may be a good idea for this reason) then mixing some in with water and applying it can reduce the sting. Note that a common misconception is that all wasp stings are alkali, and therefore vinegar should be applied - ...


3

My mother swears by a combination wasp-repellant and sunscreen that she buys from Boots in England. I see they also carry wasp repellant alone, at http://www.boots.com/en/Boots-Pharmaceuticals-Repel-Insect-Repellent-Spray-Wasp-120ml-_1207452/#detailedInfo You could poke around a little on sites like that, or just go to a largish pharmacy and see what you ...


3

Just grab and pull. Seriously, after years living in the leach-infested tropics where I would find 20 or so on me just from walking up to base-camp for breakfast, the only wrong way to remove a leech I have noticed, is by freaking out and shaking your appendage violently yelling "eeeeeewwwwww!" Yes, as Rory Alsop mentions, gently prying the sucker away is ...


2

I deal with this problem by wearing a large set of sunglasses. Mine were originally designed for snowstorms - large circles, which leave nearly no gap to the face, plus side inserts, to limit light and wind from the sides. Work wonders, plus this solution frees the hands for energetic activities, like biking or wood hgathering.


2

Possible steps to take: You could attempt to lure and trap them into a container filled with vinegar and a squirt of dish washing soap. Possible traps include: covering container with plastic foil and poking relatively small holes or making a funnel out of lightweight cardboard. An alternative would be to take tobacco from a cigarette or a cigar, chew on ...


2

Whether it's hogwash or not is besides the point in my opinion - the fact of the matter is match heads aren't designed to be ingested and therefore while consuming them may increase your sulfur levels which may help keep the bugs off, there's also a good chance you'll be consuming random poisonous chemicals. Weighing it up, I think I'd take my chances with ...


1

Agree with both LBell and Rory Alsop. I come from the leech infested Western Ghats of the Indian subcontinent. I must have been bitten by these guys innumerable number of times. Most of the times, just pulling them would suffice. Leeches use both a local anaesthesia and an anti coagulant. Hence, just pulling them off wont cause any pain. If you are worried ...



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