Hot answers tagged

19

You will pick up ticks by spending a lot of time outdoors, but I routinely find them after walking across 10 ft of grass between my car and my front door. No matter how much prevention you practice, keep an eye out for Lyme symptoms, and go to the doctor for antibiotics if they show up. A vaccine would be much nicer. The socks-in-your pants method is very ...


17

Probably the single most important thing I do is to tuck the bottom of my pants into the socks. Ticks like to crawl upwards. If they drop onto your feet, they will crawls upwards on your leg looking for the first bit of soft skin with blood vessels close to the surface. If they can get inside your pants, they will find such skin eventually. Otherwise, ...


16

Sulfur is often suggested for natural mosquito repellents. I've seen recommendations for taking sulfur pills, making sulfur creams, or applying sulfur powders. According to the Colorado State University Extension, the sulfur content of cloves is the science behind garlic-based repellents or recommendations to consume garlic. That said, I would not think ...


14

Besides DEET, the CDC lists: Picaridin (Cutter Advanced, Skin So Soft Bug Guard Plus, and Autan (outside the United States)) Lemon Eucalyptus oil (PMD)** (no examples given) IR3535 (Skin So Soft Bug Guard Plus Expedition) In particular, Picaridin seems to be a viable alternative: Of the active ingredients registered with the EPA, CDC believes that ...


13

Most folks I know (including the Royal Marines) swear by Avon's Skin So Soft to repel most biting insects - it certainly works well against midges in Scotland. It is also much less harmful to the environment than DEET and leaves your skin extra soft :-)


11

Mosquitoes love me, so I've had opportunity to try many variations of repellent. Most of the things you mentioned are effective immediately after application. For me, the difference is how effective they are after hours of sweaty hiking. For that, I lean towards high percentage DEET in a lotion-type formulation like 3M Ultrathon (that particular one is 35%...


11

First of all don't scratch. blood sucking insects inject anti-coagulant under your skin to prevent your blood from clotting and forming a scab so they don't get their mouthes stuck inside you while sucking. If you scratch, you only manage to spread the anti-coagulant around under your skin, which intensifies the itch and makes things worse. Train your brain ...


11

Coincidentally one of the physicians of Tropical Disease at a major Toronto Hospital has recently done a write up on ticks and how to deal with them. You can find the full article here. Here is the relevant part in case the link breaks in the future. What you can do: Insect repellants are effective at keeping ticks away. Dr. Keystone also recommends ...


10

You are likely talking about eye flies. They feed on lachrymal secretion which your eyes produce. When they get too intense, if hiking, I either walk faster and away from wet area or use a good head net. Peter Vacco have good information on flies and also happen to make really good head nets.


10

Most likely a Caddisfly. They make homes of twigs and stones. CADDISFLY: The caddisfly lives only a short time as an adult but may spend several years as a larva. Many larvae can do something few aquatic insects can – they build their own shelter. Different kinds of caddisflies build different types of homes. Some species build homes of leaves ...


9

Physical barriers are my deterrent of choice. A good hat with mosquito netting is a northern Minnesota must have. Second best is traveling with someone more attractive to the insects than you. The amount of technical wear that is intended to shield you from biting insects is astounding and any decent outfitter can assist you in what works for the locality in ...


9

Could be two I'd guess: Labyrinth spider It's hard to completly identify but by the sound of the web shape and your description it is most likely a Labyrinth spider More info here At this time of the year, the funnel webs in our gardens are normally the work of Labyrinth spiders. Labyrinths are common, shy little critters, and being a dull grey-...


9

That actually looks to be a Woodlouse Hunter (Dysdera crocata). They prey exclusively on woodlice. They also go by a few other names such as: woodlouse spider, sowbug hunter, sowbug killer, pillbug hunter, and slater spider. Image source: http://www.whatsthatbug.com/category/spiders/sow-bug-killers/ From the Pennsylvania State Entomology Department site: ...


9

Yes, you want one of those hats with an extra long mosquito net around it: (Source: MEC) Larger ones than the one in the photo exist. In places like northern Finland in summer, you pretty much never see anyone fishing without one. I've seen people with such nets hanging from their hat, while the net reached down to their knees. Fishing is a worst-case-...


8

CO2 traps, according to the NIH, fare better than most other types of mosquito traps. For best results, you want to use a trap with counterflow technology (CFG). Note that you have to keep your "scent" down or it will overwhelm the CO2. Traps baited only with light or octenol caught few mosquitoes, whereas many were caught by traps baited with CO2 ...


8

Whether it's hogwash or not is besides the point in my opinion - the fact of the matter is match heads aren't designed to be ingested and therefore while consuming them may increase your sulfur levels which may help keep the bugs off, there's also a good chance you'll be consuming random poisonous chemicals. Weighing it up, I think I'd take my chances with ...


8

I have a very similar problem with wasps nesting in my mailbox. This has made it rather difficult to get to my mail, and pay my bills on time. I would suggest staying away from traps as, while they will trap and kill a wasp, they do have a scented bait meant to draw wasps to the area. So your camera would still probably capture a fair amount of wasps on the ...


8

avoid grass and shrubs; keep your clothings shut tight, i.e. there should be as less places for the tick to get to your body as possible; wrap socks around pants, wear long-sleeved shirt, put something on your head; inspect yourself from time to time - especially after you've been to dense plants area; very simple, but still effective (saved me a couple of ...


7

You need an antihistamine cream, there are many different brands available, but you'll find them all similarly effective.


7

The CDC says Picaridin and DEET* are the best, with Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus** being something of a shorter-lasting runner-up: Of the active ingredients registered with the EPA, CDC believes that two have demonstrated a higher degree of efficacy in the peer-reviewed, scientific literature (See Publications page.). Products containing these active ...


7

DEET can be harmful to the skin if you suffer from any skin disorders such as Eczema (as I do). I have recently started using a product called Smidge when hiking in Midge infested areas of Scotland. More details can be found here. The manufactorers claim it works on a variety of biting insects including Midges, Ticks and Mosquitoes. It does work with ...


7

There are several types and configurations of mosquito nets that you can use: ones that hang (from a single center point, or from four corners), ones that drape over your bag with one or two poles that go over your head to keep it off your face, full free-standing Depending on your situation, each has its advantages and disadvantages. Choosing a net: ...


7

Yes, deer will smell your bug spray. Even if you use all the fancy scent-eliminating sprays, soaps, and clothing detergents they can still smell you if you are sweaty. Most important is the wind factor: Deer will smell you if they are downwind of you. NRA hunting advice for first-time deer hunters: http://www.nrainsights.org/Five_Things_fs.php. I would ...


7

Citronella candles set up around a perimeter are what we use when camping. If we are going somewhere exceptionally bug-ridden, we do sometimes use DEET - it is much more effective, but rather toxic. As long as you are spraying and then leaving the area, I'd go with DEET. I hadn't realised it would melt plastic (thanks @Liam) so be careful where you spray ...


7

Possibly crayfish burrows or "chimneys". Identifying by burrow holes can be tricky though. Are they near any water? That would increase the likelyhood that they are crayfish burrows. Similar examples: http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/image/142389118 Crawfish chimneys are smokestack-looking stacks of mud that appear in fields and yards in the ...


7

Disclaimer: I have to deal with the possibility of 'mingling' with Ticks on an almost daily basis during the summer. And generally speaking am pretty up to date on 'tick stuff' however do not only take my word for it - Lyme Disease is serious - definitely look stuff up. First off, Lyme Disease is only transmitted by certain 'subspecies' of ticks. (If you'...


6

The British Army stationed in Scotland use Avon Skin So Soft (I kid you not!). The locals swear by it too.


6

I use Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus(OLE) and it works great. Cutter, Repel, and Coleman all make products that contain the EPA and CDC approved OLE.


6

If you ask civilians, you'll typically get responses along the lines of... "No way, there are dangerous chemicals!" "No way, it just doesn't work!" "No way, you'll smell like ass for weeks!" However, I (and many other military vets) can tell you that it does, in fact, work extremely well. Military men (and recently maybe women) have been using this ...



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