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10

First of all don't scratch. blood sucking insects inject anti-coagulant under your skin to prevent your blood from clotting and forming a scab so they don't get their mouthes stuck inside you while sucking. If you scratch, you only manage to spread the anti-coagulant around under your skin, which intensifies the itch and makes things worse. Train your brain ...


8

That actually looks to be a Woodlouse Hunter (Dysdera crocata). They prey exclusively on woodlice. They also go by a few other names such as: woodlouse spider, sowbug hunter, sowbug killer, pillbug hunter, and slater spider. Image source: http://www.whatsthatbug.com/category/spiders/sow-bug-killers/ From the Pennsylvania State Entomology Department site: ...


6

Plantago works excellent againt nettle because of its anti-histamin properties and, in my experience, also against musquito bites. It grows usually in the neighbourhoud of nettle and might be the only plants that survices on a pathway: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago --> uses You need to crush the leaves and apply it on the 'wound'. (it's like ...


5

Over the counter antihistamine products - especially tablets (due to light weight and effectiveness), but also topical creams such as stop itch and antihistamines are the most effective solution. These should be carried in your first aid kit if you have a history of allergy problems. Even for those that normally don't have problems, the size and weight of ...


5

The only thing I can recommend from experience is mud: Cover the itching area with plenty of it and the itching will go away. After the mud dried out and has fallen off, sometimes the bites start to itch again, just reapply. But in most cases I never had to do that again. Generally cold helps by dulling the itching. The opposite, heat, will temporarily ...


3

In the book Lightweight Backpacking and Camping, by Ryan Jordan, p. 307, Jordan says that a supply of DEET (presumably 100% concentration) for two weeks should weigh about 0.2 oz, including the bottle. That's about 0.001 ounces per hour of hiking. You used about 1 ounce per hour. Now Jordan is writing about how to go ultralight, so his rate of consumption ...


2

I remember buying in pharmacies a liquid prepared on the spot, from mint powder and saline solution (unfortunately this mix is sort of local-specific to our Romanian pharmacies, so I cannot provide a link). This was applied on mosquito bites and allergy rash - it stopped the itching for an hour or two. Based on this experience: try some sort of minty cream ...


2

Being a military vet from Vietnam, I've used this and I still use it. Every year in the summer in Tennessee, when the mosquitoes come out it works very well for me. Others may not be able to handle the taste. Talking to non vets who haven't used it will tell you I'm not chewing on a match.


1

I would recommend trying Repel Lemon Eucalyptus Bug Spray. The Eucalyptus oil acts as a cooling agent and helps minimize sweating. I live in a deciduous ecosystem and can promise you this stuff works. In terms of lightweight: the bottle my husband and I use has been with us on multiple camping, climbing, biking, and kayaking excursions and we still have a ...


1

The first time I tried this was at Fort Chaffee and the chiggers were so bad that people were laid out in sick call with bites all over their bodies. Me and my buddies were "the communist forces" which meant little amenities...we slept in the tall grasses for 7 days. Every day I ate a match head and never once was bit. This works.



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