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10

First of all don't scratch. blood sucking insects inject anti-coagulant under your skin to prevent your blood from clotting and forming a scab so they don't get their mouthes stuck inside you while sucking. If you scratch, you only manage to spread the anti-coagulant around under your skin, which intensifies the itch and makes things worse. Train your brain ...


9

That actually looks to be a Woodlouse Hunter (Dysdera crocata). They prey exclusively on woodlice. They also go by a few other names such as: woodlouse spider, sowbug hunter, sowbug killer, pillbug hunter, and slater spider. Image source: http://www.whatsthatbug.com/category/spiders/sow-bug-killers/ From the Pennsylvania State Entomology Department site: ...


9

Yes, you want one of those hats with an extra long mosquito net around it: (Source: MEC) Larger ones than the one in the photo exist. In places like northern Finland in summer, you pretty much never see anyone fishing without one. I've seen people with such nets hanging from their hat, while the net reached down to their knees. Fishing is a ...


6

Plantago works excellent againt nettle because of its anti-histamin properties and, in my experience, also against musquito bites. It grows usually in the neighbourhoud of nettle and might be the only plants that survices on a pathway: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago --> uses You need to crush the leaves and apply it on the 'wound'. (it's like ...


6

There exit various kinds of head or even upper body mosquito nets. You can put one over your head and the sleeping bag opening to hold them away. If you are anyway carrying a tent, I think this is optimal as it is very lightweight. As you seem to enjoy sleeping in the open, an alternative would be to ditch your tent entirely and go for a bivy bag, with ...


5

Over the counter antihistamine products - especially tablets (due to light weight and effectiveness), but also topical creams such as stop itch and antihistamines are the most effective solution. These should be carried in your first aid kit if you have a history of allergy problems. Even for those that normally don't have problems, the size and weight of ...


5

The only thing I can recommend from experience is mud: Cover the itching area with plenty of it and the itching will go away. After the mud dried out and has fallen off, sometimes the bites start to itch again, just reapply. But in most cases I never had to do that again. Generally cold helps by dulling the itching. The opposite, heat, will temporarily ...


5

In the book Lightweight Backpacking and Camping, by Ryan Jordan, p. 307, Jordan says that a supply of DEET (presumably 100% concentration) for two weeks should weigh about 0.2 oz, including the bottle. That's about 0.001 ounces per hour of hiking. You used about 1 ounce per hour. Now Jordan is writing about how to go ultralight, so his rate of consumption ...


2

I remember buying in pharmacies a liquid prepared on the spot, from mint powder and saline solution (unfortunately this mix is sort of local-specific to our Romanian pharmacies, so I cannot provide a link). This was applied on mosquito bites and allergy rash - it stopped the itching for an hour or two. Based on this experience: try some sort of minty cream ...


2

Being a military vet from Vietnam, I've used this and I still use it. Every year in the summer in Tennessee, when the mosquitoes come out it works very well for me. Others may not be able to handle the taste. Talking to non vets who haven't used it will tell you I'm not chewing on a match.


2

During turkey season I practically bathe in regular deet based spray since turkeys can't smell. Thing is, this spring I had a deer walking around calmly 10-15 yards from me more than once. Can they smell it? Sure. Does it alarm them? Why should it? I would think only if they've made an association between it and danger.


2

I never heard of the pencil trick and I'd be wary. But using a cup with a lid is probably the most obvious choice.


2

Depends on how much you put on. It may be helpful to first identify why you are a mosquito magnet. Mosquitos are attracted to primarily two things that you can control: odour and heat. Unfortunately, about 85% of what makes people mosquito magnets is suspected to be genetics, so there's not much you can do about that, except to try and mask the scent of ...


2

In country plagued by mosquitoes, no-see-ums, black-flies, and other blood-sucking bugs, people MUST live within "bubbles" of fine-mesh net. The bloodsucking insects are so annoying that they regularly drive stalwart indigenous animals such as moose and bears MAD with pain, leading the animals to charge bellowing madly through the bush. The only ways ...


2

Yes...though we're not sure why?! DEET will prevent pretty much all bugs from biting you. No one's really sure the mechanism of how or why this is the case though. DEET was actually developed by accident, the US government was working with new chemicals for use in warfare when they noticed that DEET repelled mosquitoes. They quickly changed it's status from ...


1

This answer focuses on management not repelling, fleas have a complex life cycle, If you repel 99 of 100 fleas, that one is going to be living on you with it's family. The internet has LOTS of yes answers to this question, random example. most are focused on animals because, well... I don't know why. People get fleas also. As rule there is a different ...


1

You should keep in mind: DEET is not an insect repellent that will prevent insects from landing on your skin! DEET is a contact poison that will be very unpleasant for any insect who gets into contact with your skin - they essentially 'burn their feet'. This prevents mosquitoes/black flies/knot/... from stinging you, but they will still try to land on your ...


1

I would recommend trying Repel Lemon Eucalyptus Bug Spray. The Eucalyptus oil acts as a cooling agent and helps minimize sweating. I live in a deciduous ecosystem and can promise you this stuff works. In terms of lightweight: the bottle my husband and I use has been with us on multiple camping, climbing, biking, and kayaking excursions and we still have a ...


1

The first time I tried this was at Fort Chaffee and the chiggers were so bad that people were laid out in sick call with bites all over their bodies. Me and my buddies were "the communist forces" which meant little amenities...we slept in the tall grasses for 7 days. Every day I ate a match head and never once was bit. This works.



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