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21

Don't get wet! No I'm not being facetious, I hike through the rain forests of BC all the time, I've spent days in a row in solid rain while backpacking and setting up camp. Getting wet up here can mean death overnight even in the middle of summer, doesn't matter how hot it gets during the day, temperatures can drop to near zero overnight, if you're wet when ...


8

TL;DR: Bring a set of clothes that are comfy-when-wet and expect to spend a lot of time in them. Keep a set of dry clothes for in-the-tent-only use. Don't ever let your wet clothes come into contact with your dry clothes, cause now you have a whole lot of damp clothes. I've done a lot of 3-week canoe trips and 3+ day winter hikes at -30 C (-22 F) ...


5

Physics-wise, this is called Capillary Action. i.e. touching the surface changes the physical characteristics. Simpler explanation - take a look at water in a glass. Notice the meniscus (the way water seems to rise at the edges)? That's capillary action caused by the water in contact with the glass. Don't think the hydrostatic head measures this per se. ...


4

The best solution will depend a lot on your particular tent and general set-up but here are a few pointers. Try and keep kit in your tent neat and to a minimum. If you are trekking you probably won't have too much kit anyway. If you are car camping try and keep as much stuff in you car as possible (its nice and dry in there). Keeping your kit tidy and ...


4

Bears behave differently in places where they are used to a lot of human activity vs places where they are generally left alone. They learn and adapt. For example, in the Adirondacks in NY, bears have become adept at recognizing and grabbing human food from "bear bags" (food hung from a tree, theoretically out of reach on a limb that won't support the bear's ...


3

AlbertaParks.ca is the resource about all parks in Alberta. I find the maps perfectly easy to read myself. If you want to see where all the parks are, just use google maps, it highlights all provincial, National, and even some regional parks in green, and shows you all roads.


3

Some of the things you've listed as precautions used in the US are not real or not reasonable. worry about the tent or shirt you sleep in smelling after food from 6 months ago This is silly. bear bells This is a joke. Using a bear canister, on the other hand, is reasonable and in fact legally required in some national parks in the US. But what ...


3

Everyone has given a lot of good advice about clothing and shoes. I'd like to add to what ShemSeger said about the tent. If you are expecting rain, or if it is raining, you want to be extra careful about how you set up your tent. Normally, you would just be looking for a nice, flat place without stones, but if you're expecting rain, that nice flat place can ...


3

As far as precautions go, look at everything and ask the question "what happens if it breaks?" It's much better to have several pounds of gear that you don't use, because the one time you do need it, you really do need it! The most pointless piece of equipment is the spare that's sat on the shelf at home. :) I'm used to solo walking, so I pack heavy and ...


3

I think my slightly tongue in cheek comment is relevant. Maybe you need a bigger tent: Or to follow the fast and light principles and just take less stuff. Baring that If you tent has something inside it to suspend a clothes line then maybe you could rig up some kind of netting (suspended form the poles at either end of the tent like a hammock) to hold ...


2

After taking a look into it, it appears that the grizzly bears in North America are actually a sub species (ssp.) of European brown bear. Brown Bear = Ursus arctos Grizzly Bear = Ursus arctos ssp. U. a. californicus (Recently extinct California Grizzly) U. a. gyas (Peninsular Grizzly) U. a. horribilis (Mainland Grizzly) U. a. middendorffi (Kodiak ...


1

Yes, it is indeed due to Capillary action. As there are great answers already by Dynadin and Aravona and Snow Crash, I would strictly limit the scope of my answer to why it happens and how, just to clarify how the Capillary Action comes in place. The basic property of water molecules is staying together, we refer that as Cohesion, and those molecules also ...


1

If the fire seems to die out, use a long stick or a fire poker to move the logs and woods around. You should also blow on them, to provide a burst of oxygen. Keep working on the fire until it seems to be stable again, if you neglect it, it will go out. A good sign is red, hot charcoal. These are so much hotter than the original wood was, and they will get ...



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