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17

There are all kinds of people who put up the fly first, then crouch under it putting up the inside. It's generally a very unpleasant experience from all I have heard, what with the crouching, crawling, and being rained on at least while getting the fly up. I handle it completely differently, because I have a free standing tent. On arrival at a site the very ...


15

The first solution that comes to mind is a "zeer", or pot-in-pot refrigerator. However, this functions best in hot and dry environments as it relies on evaporation to work. Such a device is constructed by nesting one clay pot inside another, with a layer of sand between them (about an inch on the bottom, a few inches on the sides). The sand is then soaked ...


15

For tents that erect outer first, pitching in the rain is no different to any other time, just don't leave the dry inner out in the rain while putting the outer up. The outer will get wet on both sides anyway. To make this easier a bit of forward planning is useful, like pack the inner and outer separately so that you can just leave the inner in the car ...


15

Get them lost. Basically you want to get them out to where they lose their bearings, and then as a group, get them to find their way home. Good acting helps. If you can pretend you are also lost then they get the mental experience. This is a great way to teach people how to deal with really being lost. There are a couple of key points here, and the ...


12

Most gear you can test out in your house. Take your boots out on any trail, each time you go out pack a little bit more in your pack and get used to the weight. Come up with a good clothing layer system. Make sure you can get your tent set up quickly. There is nothing like setting up in a downpour minutes before sundown. You can practice this inside. Make ...


12

To test your hiking kit/boots to see if it is all comfortable/fits you can do a day walk but carrying your full rucksack and kit (or stuff of similar weight). This will give you a idea of how your kit fits and the difference in hiking with a full rucksack compared to a daysack to help you judge how far you should aim for. Most of your camping kit can be ...


12

If the poles of your tent attach to the outer you're in luck. Before you go remove the inner from the outer and pack these separately, potentially wrap them in plastic bags or something so they stay dry. Then when you turn up your first task is to get the waterproof outer up as fast as possible. If it rains while you're putting this up, it's fine. Just ...


11

Although technology has brought us many conveniences most of them require supporting power or other technology. You seem set on refrigeration and you say: "I am willing to go to just about any extent short of buying a fridge and a generator." Perhaps you should consider solar panels (photovoltaic) and an electric refrigerator. Both technologies are ...


10

I would recommend covering some of the following topics: First Aid - focus on how to stabilize an injured person and how to transport them. Teach them how to splint a sprained ankle and treat heat stroke, hypothermia, dehydration, shock, how to stop bleeding, and other basic first aid skills. A good teamwork skill to practice is transporting an injured ...


9

The outside of a tent is designed to get wet, the key trick is to keep everything else dry. You will want to pitch the outer first and only then add the inner. The other answer has covered that well. Some more general tips though is to have a look at the base of your inner tent and see how waterproof it is. A lot of ground sheets are not waterproof at all. ...


8

http://visitadirondacks.com/stay/campgrounds/backcountry-camping-rules-guidelines You only need a permit if your group is 10+ or you are staying in one location for more than 3 days. You don't need reservations for areas which allow primitive camping, but there are some campgrounds which require it. The Adirondacks are composed of a lot of areas with ...


8

For any reasonable depth (ie. something you'd be willing to dig without specialized machinery), a deeper hole makes for a more stable temperature. The extra mass of soil surrounding your cellar acts to average out temperature changes: shallow burial averages out day-night shifts, while deeper averages out seasonal changes as well. The end result is that a ...


8

All the other answers are correct and good. Car-Camping If the problem is that you want a realistic test but either (a) do not have much time, or (b) wisely do not want to go out backpacking on a test trip alone, then do a car camping trip as a "dress rehearsal". Find a car-camping site.Preferably in the wild or woods, rather than a developed KOA-stlye ...


7

I would imagine the "testing" others referred to is suitability for purpose rather than will the gear end up damaged or broken. For example, if using a new tent, have you practiced pitching it at home first rather than waiting until you have to use it while in the middle of nowhere? Or is the stove and cooking equipment you plan to carry able to cope with ...


7

Blacks / Millets do festival pop up tents (take it out the bag and it literally pops up) and pole system tents in your price range by Eurohike and Vango, who are both good well known brands. Bear in mind for that price range I don't see you getting anything that will have brilliant reviews. You'll be able to buy them brand new so shouldn't have to worry ...


6

You'll need to do several things: Change your habits and foods Work Combine several techniques First, you need to more carefully consider the necessity of refrigeration. Refrigerators are used to keep food in a "safe" temperature zone where bacteria is less active, and this requires temperatures close to freezing. Passive cooling, such as root cellars ...


5

No, it is not true that necessarily the deeper you get the cooler it gets. For really deep holes it is actually the opposite, the deeper you get the warmer the temperature gets. This is called the Geothermal Gradient. This states that temperature goes up 25C per 1KM of depth. For the first couple of meters the temperature will likely drop or raise ...


5

Assuming you don't have an outer first tent pitching in the rain comes down to planning and practice. It is actually possible to stay fairly dry if you're organised. There is no sure fire method but there are a few tricks which can help you keep the inner dry. Don't wrap the tent poles up inside the tent, this will force you to unwrap the tent while it's ...


5

I don't know which part of the world you are in, but if it is the United States, and if these are Boy Scouts, then be certain you consult the "Guide to Safe Scouting". You may also want to consult the "Wilderness Survival" merit badge book for some ideas.


5

"Your [plane/ship] has [crashed in the jungle/sunk near an island]. Here's what you were able to salvage from the wreck. Oh, and $HeaviestKId has broken his leg" In our case we had food but no cooking equipment, i.e. we had to cook bread wrapped round a twig and improvise a frying pan from metal sheet, make a stretcher...


4

Firstly, if possible, wait a while. Find somewhere to shelter out of the rain, and wait to see if the rain stops. For typical UK summer weather, most heavy rain is only short showers. So it will probably stop raining (or at least ease off) in 10 minutes or so. If its not going to stop raining, you can unpack your tent while under shelter. Then sort out ...


4

In Germany, cheaper pop-up tents like this are quite popular for festivals. I would never buy one, though, for the following reasons: Every tent of those I have seen have been very prone to breaking. A friend of mine just discovered his (brand new one) was broken when he arrived on the campground. Because the poles are fixed inside you can´t even improvise ...


4

Going to make some assumptions here. Communal cooking People bringing own ingredients, contributions Given the two above Reasonably large pot (two liter) Reasonably large pan (more than 8") Grill surface/fuel. It is hard to advise here without knowing more. But something like this coleman would work. If you are SURE you can have a fire, just grab a ...


4

Here's what I've done for group camping (both car & canoe camping). Communal food & cooking. It's just easier. Cooking equipment. You bring what you need depending on what food you buy, or buy food that can be cooked with the equipment you have. Some details. Pot/pans. Think about what you may be cooking at the same time. Are you going to boil ...


4

Wildcamping is always a lot more interesting than staying on a "safe" campsite with showers, toilets, taps etc. Since you are staying at one of these campsites you could try finding an area that is far away from the facilities to make it seem more remote. If there is a clean enough stream/river/burn nearby you could encourage the scouts to collect water ...


3

There can't be any general rule on testing equipment but you should have tested at least all the features that you think you will need during your journey. You also do not necessarily have to test all your stuff at once. For "technical" equipment such as tents, stoves and the like, it might be enough to just learn their handling. Nothing is more annoying ...


3

I also hadn't thought of tent hire. Quick search gives http://www.tent2hire.co.uk/ and http://www.campinggearhire.co.uk/ for UK services. Cost about £20-30 for a weekend + ~£100 deposit for a 2-3 man tent. The deposit would make me nervous about taking a tent like that to a festival. Depends what sort of festival it is though... As mentioned by Aravona I ...


3

In addition to the other answers, if you expect heavy rain (I'm also heading for Snowdonia this weekend...) be careful about the location you choose as well. Avoid places near rivers or streams but also avoid hollows in the ground or the bottom of slopes. Your groundsheet may be waterproof but its sides only extend upwards for a certain length and it is ...


3

About 20 years ago, I had a whole day free between two business engagements in the Bay area. I stumbled upon a apparently little-known state park that if I remember right was south and a little east of the built-up area. I think it was called Henry W. Coe State Park. It was mostly in the hills east of the valley. I remember being surprised how few people ...


3

I'll start this as a community wiki and seed it with a few places. While places like Shasta and the Sierra may be within 3 hours drive, this is usually not the case once traffic and speed limits are factored in. Note that nearly all of these sites will require reservations, and may fill up quickly in busy months. Local definitions: Dispersed Camping: ...



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