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15

Should I understand a water source to mean a spring/well, or any place where hikers may collect water (streams, lakes, etc.)? Yes. Any source of water - no matter how large or small - should be avoided when choosing a camp site. 100 meters is just a guideline, 200 meters is better. 200 meters and out of sight is great. The reasons are several-fold: ...


13

This answer may depend on the type of bear, but somehow I doubt it. If you ever visit Yosemite National Park, go to the Happy Isles Visitor Center. They have an old Jeep door on display. The Jeep had once belonged by a camper who left a tube of chap stick in their car as they slept. A black bear smelled the chap stick inside the closed Jeep ...


11

My experience comes mostly from backpacking in remote areas without already made tent sites. I have found that a hammock is better for me and my style of camping. If you are mostly a car-camper and are used to pulling your SUV up to a pad site, YMMV. Following are the reasons I believe a Hammock is better than a Tent. Weight - In all but the coldest ...


9

Avoid bee hives Avoid bee hives See 1 & 2 Once you've pissed the bees off there is little to nothing you can do. Getting out of the area is the obvious answer, but that is difficult mid-climb. We have all sort of wasps, bees, etc. in my area of the Southeastern US and the advice is the same. Be alert and don't hit a nest. A swarm of hornet makes ...


9

Sleeping with the socks on your torso is the most effective method I have found, and it does not require anything you wouldn't already have. For this, you just: Take socks off Put them inside your shirt, under all layers of clothing. They must be touching your skin. Sleep Wake up in the morning with dry socks. This works with a lot of things: socks, ...


8

Since your question is tagged with backpacking and wild-camping, I am assuming you are out in the wilderness. In that case, just hide your valuables prior to arrival at the beach. Just head 15+ feet off of the trail, and you should be trivially able to find a spot to hide a handful of stuff. From geocaching, even if someone was to know the general ...


8

The breed of dog will make a difference, but most "backpacking" dogs will do just fine in the open or under the tarp with you. A dog's metabolism works differently than humans, and they generate a lot more body heat. Consider sled dogs that stick their nose under their tail and sleep through a driving blizzard (and sled dogs usually aren't the thick-fur ...


7

Plenty of places sell sleeping bag liners. Sometimes they are designed to make the bag warmer, other times to be more absorbent. For example, Mountain Equipment co-op sells quite a few, some of which are cotton and mention "absorbency" and "comfort" in their descriptions. I don't doubt that other suppliers offer them too.


7

I get far too hot but like you I find that layer part of the night gets cold. My solution in temperate climates is to only ever zip the sleeping bag up halfway so the top half is left loose, that way I can pull it over me or off again without waking up. If it is a wee bit cooler you could try this technique as well as a thin sheet or blanket.


7

I almost always sleep with my backpack--in fact, I use it as part of my sleep system as I use a shorter sleeping pad, so the backpack goes under my feet. Keeping the pack in your tent gives maximum protection from the worst backcountry pests--mice and their kin. In the past I've left my pack outside covered in a large, thick trash bag. I think once I ended ...


7

Endurance and muscle strength are completely different things. From my experience and observations, hikers are usually thin (or even very thin) and big, strong muscles doesn't contribute to endurance. Often, because large muscles require more energy, they may be handicapping the hiking endurance. I've observed no endurance difference between big man and ...


6

Heartwood, assuming the definition on Wikipedia as basically just the middle of the tree that is no longer growing, is indeed what you will be burning most of the time as fuel for your fire. Considering it has not been growing for some time, it may well be somewhat drier than the surrounding sapwood, and therefore actually burn better. That said, the ...


6

I cant speak for all, but here is what I do: Running. Improves your lung capacity, improves your stamina, strengthens your bones. Weighted Squats. Dynamically works the majority of your body, especially the core. Core strengthening exercise like crunches or bicycles. Push ups. Just to improve my core strength along with arm strength. Pull ups. Works the ...


6

There are basically two things to distinguish. The one is overall fitness, stamina, and core strength, the other is to endure some of the stress of the backpack on your shoulders over longer time. For the former you can train by running or biking for fitness and core strengthening exercises for the strength. Especially for the core, don't do only those ...


6

The answer is no, you may only camp in designated areas. Camping is only allowed in designated areas at Jasper park. If you contact the park directly by e-mail the answer is the following: In Jasper National Park, when hikers are hiking on trails they must camp in the designated backcountry campsites only. From the official Parks Canada Backcountry ...


5

I have come across wild boars about a dozen times (I admit, not that much), in numbers from a single male, mothers with young upto groups of 30-40 and I've never felt threatened. Sometimes the leading (fe)male might approach you aggressively just long enough for the rest of the group to run away and then retreat too. I usually stay silent and try to observe ...


5

Upfront I would like to mention that I don't live in the UK, but I hope my answer is still relevant. The most commonly used stove brand in the US is Coleman, and I looked on amazon.co.uk, and it looks like they are common in the UK as well. For Coleman camping stoves you can buy adapter cables to connect them to large, refillable propane tanks. The common ...


5

I caution against storing the food in your car. Bears have been known to do serious damage to a car trying to get in. Hence Don't eat in the car - ever Do not store food or other items that "smell" open in you car While in transit, store items in sealed containers in your trunk If you are in designated car camping spots, check to see if they have ...


5

Unless food or another smelly substance has been spilled on the backpack, and so long as all such temptations have been removed from the pack and placed in the suspended bear bag, it should be safe to keep it on the ground for the night--whether it's propped against a tree, placed in your tent's vestibule or in the tent with you. Think of it this way: you ...


4

There is one thing about tents in general (well, at least I don't know any exception) - they are absolutely not waterproof!. The outer part simply soaks with water and leads it down to the ground. But if you touch it - you have a rain inside. It's just like touching the surface of the umbrella from the below. So there is one thing you must take very ...


4

There are a couple of reasons for this, as I understand it: Your wastes (soap, Giardia in your poop, DEET, ...) will contaminate the water. Lakeshores in high-altitude areas tend to be very delicate. People do a lot of ecological damage by pitching their tents right there. Unlike high-altitude areas in the Alps, the ones in the western US do not have huts, ...


4

There is at least one documented incident with a bear that occurred in the 1980s which may have been related sexual intercourses. Unfortunately the two teenagers, Jane Ammerman and Kim Eberly, did not survive. Stephen Herrero wrote about the incident in his book titled Bear Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance: When our investigating team visited the ...


4

To ensure your valuables stay dry and clean (wouldn't want to short out any electronics like your car remote lock or phone if an unexpected shower comes along) you can use a waterproof bag (relatively inexpensive) or an Otterbox (or similar) - both found in kayaking section. To ensure that you are able to find your items that you have so cleverly hidden ...


4

An additional point that hasn't been mentioned, is when you camp next to a creek or stream the water level can quickly change, sometimes by quite a bit. It can be sunny where you are camped but heavy rain miles upstream from you, and the raising water level could wash away half of your camp while you sleep.


4

There are two problems with this question: Night-time temperatures vary a great deal across Spain-it is a big country, with coasts, plains and mountains Your ideal temperature may be very different to mine So what you want to do is look at the range of expected temperatures in the area you plan to camp, compare those with temperatures you are comfortable ...


4

I have camped in a tent with a similar rain fly - it was fine in gentle rain, and I found it amusing in a force 8 gale with lashing rain - because it leaked about 11 litres of rain into the tent overnight (so my middle daughter ended up a bit damp) My wife wasn't so keen, as she had never camped in storms before. I found it okay - if you don't like water in ...


3

Leaves under your tent will offer almost no value as you will crush them when you lay in your tent. The primary benefit from leaves comes from dead air space. However they will provide a more smooth and soft sleeping surface. Leaves piled around your tent will provide good insulation as long as they do not get wet. I could not find an R value, but I did ...


3

I've used a double liner (one inside the tent, one outside) before, and it was very effective. When I was in high school, I went on a multi-day backpacking trip where it rained every day. This was in the forecast, and bringing the double liner was the only thing that kept the water out. You could also double check that you're setting up your tent in a ...


3

Footprints: Zero? Sure. One? Good. Two? Nice. Three? Great. Four? Bomb-proof! My point is this: if you have a waterproof floor on your tent, you don't need any footprint. The trouble is, you are subjecting your tent floor to the abuses of rocks, sticks, sea-shells, brambles, or whatnot - meaning it will quickly get micro-tears and perforations. Enter ...


2

I realize you already made your trip, but I will answer your question anyhow. These tips are not regionally constrained to the Olympic Peninsula. 1) Footwear When setting out to wet places or in rainy weather always take a second pair of boots. In my experience from the army every shoe will let in water sooner or later under heavy rain. Always pack a couple ...



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