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23

As a former soldier (and Medic), I personally don't flavour my water during the outdoors. The contents of the canteen/flask might be required for a non-drinking purpose such as: Eyewash Rinsing Medical Cleaning etc However, I do flavour my water on a day-to-day basis for the gym etc using super-concentrate micro capsules such as Squash'd If you have ...


19

There are all kinds of people who put up the fly first, then crouch under it putting up the inside. It's generally a very unpleasant experience from all I have heard, what with the crouching, crawling, and being rained on at least while getting the fly up. I handle it completely differently, because I have a free standing tent. On arrival at a site the very ...


18

If you have children with you, you will have no worries about keeping yourself busy, you'll be plenty busy. If the weather is nice, your kids might enjoy games like: Throw Rocks in the Water Run Around As Fast As You Can See If You Can Throw A Prized Toy Into A Tree And Get It Stuck There Find A Stick and then Fight Over Whose Stick It Is My kids also ...


18

For tents that erect outer first, pitching in the rain is no different to any other time, just don't leave the dry inner out in the rain while putting the outer up. The outer will get wet on both sides anyway. To make this easier a bit of forward planning is useful, like pack the inner and outer separately so that you can just leave the inner in the car ...


17

Get them lost. Basically you want to get them out to where they lose their bearings, and then as a group, get them to find their way home. Good acting helps. If you can pretend you are also lost then they get the mental experience. This is a great way to teach people how to deal with really being lost. There are a couple of key points here, and the ...


17

Having spent most of my life within a couple of miles of the beach in pretty windy areas, I have learned some tried and tested things you can do (although I have never found it much of an issue in any case) Always point the opening of your tent downwind so sand doesn't blow in. This will prevent the majority of your sand-related problems. Keep sand from ...


16

I regularly backpack overnight with two dogs (one is a great dane / lab mix) in the US. A tired dog is a good dog. I have an advantage of several miles of hiking in, but you can still tire the dog out when you get there. A frisbee (flying disc) and swimming works well for my big guy (the lab mix), my smaller girl is tired from the hike itself. Whatever ...


15

The first solution that comes to mind is a "zeer", or pot-in-pot refrigerator. However, this functions best in hot and dry environments as it relies on evaporation to work. Such a device is constructed by nesting one clay pot inside another, with a layer of sand between them (about an inch on the bottom, a few inches on the sides). The sand is then soaked ...


14

Footprints: Zero? Sure. One? Good. Two? Nice. Three? Great. Four? Bomb-proof! My point is this: if you have a waterproof floor on your tent, you don't need any footprint. The trouble is, you are subjecting your tent floor to the abuses of rocks, sticks, sea-shells, brambles, or whatnot - meaning it will quickly get micro-tears and perforations. Enter ...


14

I suppose the two main factors are how comfortable the location is and how likely the location is to have problems should the weather play an influence. For comfort, the best location will be flat, free from bumps, and objects such as sharp rocks or sticks which can damage the groundsheet. Even with a decent sleeping pad or mattress, it isn't very nice when ...


14

Basically you should never find yourself in such a situation under normal circumstances. Tents are supposed to keep you warm, and not the other way round. If you are doing that more often then I'd say you have the wrong gear being used at the wrong place. Yet, there may rise a situation when you need to do it, there are ways to do it, but honestly you'll ...


13

I would recommend covering some of the following topics: First Aid - focus on how to stabilize an injured person and how to transport them. Teach them how to splint a sprained ankle and treat heat stroke, hypothermia, dehydration, shock, how to stop bleeding, and other basic first aid skills. A good teamwork skill to practice is transporting an injured ...


12

My experience comes mostly from backpacking in remote areas without already made tent sites. I have found that a hammock is better for me and my style of camping. If you are mostly a car-camper and are used to pulling your SUV up to a pad site, YMMV. Following are the reasons I believe a Hammock is better than a Tent. Weight - In all but the coldest ...


12

If the poles of your tent attach to the outer you're in luck. Before you go remove the inner from the outer and pack these separately, potentially wrap them in plastic bags or something so they stay dry. Then when you turn up your first task is to get the waterproof outer up as fast as possible. If it rains while you're putting this up, it's fine. Just ...


12

To test your hiking kit/boots to see if it is all comfortable/fits you can do a day walk but carrying your full rucksack and kit (or stuff of similar weight). This will give you a idea of how your kit fits and the difference in hiking with a full rucksack compared to a daysack to help you judge how far you should aim for. Most of your camping kit can be ...


12

Most gear you can test out in your house. Take your boots out on any trail, each time you go out pack a little bit more in your pack and get used to the weight. Come up with a good clothing layer system. Make sure you can get your tent set up quickly. There is nothing like setting up in a downpour minutes before sundown. You can practice this inside. Make ...


11

The general guideline for tornado safety is to get as low to the ground as possible and assume the tornado safety crouch: Wind speeds will be slower close to the ground, you are less likely to be hit by a flying object, and are less of a target for lightning strikes. In the same vein, it is best to avoid stands of trees if possible because the risk of ...


11

Although technology has brought us many conveniences most of them require supporting power or other technology. You seem set on refrigeration and you say: "I am willing to go to just about any extent short of buying a fridge and a generator." Perhaps you should consider solar panels (photovoltaic) and an electric refrigerator. Both technologies are ...


10

Look for wildlife. This will depend on where in the world you are camping, but in most rural areas, there will be some wildlife around. And its often possible to see some of it without too much effort. See how many different species of birds you can spot - binoculars and a field guide may be helpful. Or try photographing a variety of animals. You can even ...


10

One way I was taught in the uk armed forces (a very long time ago) was to use dry rocks. Heat the rock in your camp fire, then carefully just before bed time, place the rock inside your shelter, the rock releases it's heat slowly and acts very much like a radiator producing a consistent source of dry heat. A word of warning though this method was never ...


9

Yes, the R-value will add of your different layers. If you wear layer A with R=5 and layer B with R=2.5, the overall insulation value will be R=7.5. To explain this a bit, we think of two layers or flat walls which interact only due to thermal conduction. This is just a model and in reality other effects will come in play. The Fourier Law for thermal ...


9

In addition to Kate's excellent answer I have the following advice, from over 35 years camping (13 of them with kids): If there is the slightest chance of the entire holiday being rainy, take a tent much larger than you need. This isn't just to give you room to dry wet things, store dry stuff etc., but it gives kids the opportunity to play in the tent ...


9

It's not a myth. In Sweden allemansrätten (lit. "the everyman's right") is a freedom granted by the Constitution of Sweden. Since 1994 the Instrument of Government says that notwithstanding the right to own property "everyone shall have access to nature in accordance with allemansrätten" source: Wiki You are allowed to use nature but you are also ...


9

The outside of a tent is designed to get wet, the key trick is to keep everything else dry. You will want to pitch the outer first and only then add the inner. The other answer has covered that well. Some more general tips though is to have a look at the base of your inner tent and see how waterproof it is. A lot of ground sheets are not waterproof at all. ...


9

Some back-of-the-envelope calculations: 12 volts * 4 amps = 48 watts * 8 hours = 384 watt-hours. That's the minimum battery capacity you'll need to power this for a night. The Goal Zero Sherpa 50 you propose to use will power it for about an hour, give or take efficiency losses. To power the blanket for the night, you're looking for something more along ...


9

What kind of shelter you can build will depend on what is around you at the time. If you are in a forest or woodland you will obviously have more to utilise than in a desert or moorland, but from my own experiences I've built shelters in British deciduous and coniferous woodlands. During Girl Guides (bit like Scouts) and school based Team Building weeks we ...


8

Endurance and muscle strength are completely different things. From my experience and observations, hikers are usually thin (or even very thin) and big, strong muscles doesn't contribute to endurance. Often, because large muscles require more energy, they may be handicapping the hiking endurance. I've observed no endurance difference between big man and ...


8

The answer is no, you may only camp in designated areas. Camping is only allowed in designated areas at Jasper park. If you contact the park directly by e-mail the answer is the following: In Jasper National Park, when hikers are hiking on trails they must camp in the designated backcountry campsites only. From the official Parks Canada Backcountry ...


8

We've camped for a month (4 adults/no kids), no TV, no phone, no radio or power & one water spigot. We didn't manage to get bored. Other than the routine of getting firewood/cooking/cleaning, here's some of the things we did: Swim. We went swimming a few times a day to cool off. Explore. This was a new area to us so we took advantage of the time to see ...


8

Camping under a tree protects against rain wind morning dew heavy sun (worst on beaches) you can hide your bike from the rain ;) But you lose the sight of the stars. If rain is possible, it is a good idea to try to imagine how will the water be flowing downhill and not camp in its way. On the topic, if thunderstorm is possible, don't camp on top of a ...



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