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0

My friend has made a camping power box that uses (two?) car batteries to store the power. Instructions for making something similar can be found here and probably many other places. This more than supplies our needs including phones, lights, radio and electric 'fridge'. The major issue is getting enough solar power to recharge it particularly when it is not ...


7

Some back-of-the-envelope calculations: 12 volts * 4 amps = 48 watts * 8 hours = 384 watt-hours. That's the minimum battery capacity you'll need to power this for a night. The Goal Zero Sherpa 50 you propose to use will power it for about an hour, give or take efficiency losses. To power the blanket for the night, you're looking for something more along ...


2

In Greece wild camping is illegal in general. The more famous/well known is the place where you camp, the more probable is to have a visit from the police. Checks more often take place during summer in islands and in general near tourist sites. On the other hand there are certain places where wild camping is silently permitted since it is a boost to their ...


2

I've always found fake "moulage" injuries to be a popular activity. You apply the wounds then ask them to perform proper first aid based on the injury they see. One of the times I had my brother apply a broken bone moulage to me, then I just waited on the trail for our troop to hike by--they had no idea that I was going to be there. They had to treat the ...


3

There are two options. You could buy a 2-season tent, that would be light(er than a 4 season for sure) or a tent fly. A tent fly would be ideal as it would be very light but I wouldn't use in some places where there are animals dangerous wandering around during the night. A 2-season tent you can zip it up and sleep without the problem of snakes, scorpions ...


1

Propel Zero powder packs is what I use on backpacking trips once I make camp. During each day of hiking I only drink water and obtain needed nutrition through food. After I finish for the day I will drink 16 or 20 ounces of water flavored with one Propel Zero packet while I rest and setup camp or my area in a shelter. Then it's back to water for dinner.


0

You might consider boiling it up with some berries, (suitable) plants or pine needles. In terms of treatment tablets, there are neutralisers to sort the taste out, but they are not perfect. For a double solution, you might want to try those effervescent vitamin c tablets. Orange is nice.


1

Since I don't like putting anything besides water in my water bottles while I'm backpacking, I typically will just alternate Gatorade powder with a swish of water, then mix it together in my mouth. Definitely gets rid of the sugar craving, since, after all, you're just eating sugar.


5

I preferably avoid artificial materials, so I would use lemon, orange or grapefruit juice, just a bit for the taste, not really making lemonade (although it might irritate your stomach after several days of drinking it). Crushed herb leaves can also give a new taste to the already "boring" water - for this purpose I would use mint, wild thyme, basil or ...


21

As a former soldier (and Medic), I personally don't flavour my water during the outdoors. The contents of the canteen/flask might be required for a non-drinking purpose such as: Eyewash Rinsing Medical Cleaning etc However, I do flavour my water on a day-to-day basis for the gym etc using super-concentrate micro capsules such as Squash'd If you have ...


6

That is a very tricky question... Pure water is the best for everything. There are lots of things you can use to add some taste and make it easy to drink but there are some considerations about that as well. For sure those electrolytes are the best options but they are not cheap. In a camping trip, where exercise is not the focus, all those already said, ...


2

I take the small packets of gatorade or similar that offers flavor plus electrolytes. I find that flavouring helps to make certain sources of water palatable when filtering it out in the backcountry.


5

Few things I do: bring tea. bring water flavoring packets, like Crystal Light or Propel. bring coffee or instant coffee. know your surrounding vegetation and make tea out of different plants, leaves, and/or roots. Emphasis on knowing your surrounding vegetation; make sure you know which plants (or parts of plants) are suitable for consumption.


2

This depends a lot on what you plan to do, and I don't think there's any such thing as an all-purpose knife. I mostly use mine when hiking and backpacking, when it would be silly to bring a big, heavy knife that I don't need. For what I do, what works great is a tiny swiss army knife, which I mainly use for slicing food (knife blade), cutting moleskin ...


7

I'm a lurker on two knife-related forums (Bladeforums.com and Knifeforums.com). On both of them, "what knife should I buy" or "what is the best knife for X" are either closed quickly or become very hot topics because there is no right answer, only lots and lots and lots of opinions. See this thread for a recent discussion of the topic (including some nice ...


1

It's unclear whether you are experienced in backpacking. Are you asking how is Yellowstone different compared to other locations, or are you asking how to prepare for backpacking in general? In the first case, Yellowstone would be different than some other places due to: geothermal activity. you can encounter hot waters and some of these may have ...


2

You can test everything at home, in your yard, and at the gym. At home, test your water filter, setting up the tent in the backyard, assembling and lighting your stove and boiling some water (don't forget your windscreen), any fishing gear you might have, and setting up a fire in your backyard. At the gym, take your loaded backpack with you and do some ...


3

I carry two knives when i'm backpacking: a small Swiss army knife (the "Classic" model) and a large hunting knife (I can't remember the brand, it is a good quality one, cost about $150). The Swiss army knife is lightweight and indispensable for its use as a can opener, for gutting fish, and general purpose tools. The authentic Swiss army knives are also ...


2

go out and collect sample leaves and see if they can identify them (don't pick anything poisonous... show them the plant without disturbing it if/when you find it!) bonus points if they can identify which ones are edible or which have medicinal properties!


2

teach them how to make charcloth... use it to make a fire using as many different starting methods as possible (lense, flint/steal, bow/drill, etc)


3

a good stalking exercise is fun! Draw straws to see who the first "target" is and have them sit in a clearing blindfolded while the other players hide in the woods around the target (specify a starting distance). Once all are hidden the target may remove the blindfold and stand up, turn, but not move. The stalkers then begin to close in on the target. ...


3

In our last camp we had the scouts build a bridge over the river; also, bivouac during a 2-3 day long hike; or you might try what we call the "three eagle feathers" challenge: each feather stands for a test - 24 hours alone in the forest (with extra task to sneak close to the camp and spy without being seen), 24 hours with no speaking, 24 hours with no food. ...


3

Make a sunhat or rainhat out of grass. Make a stretcher out of wood and bootlaces and carry the heaviest Scout (heh heh) for twenty metres (over some mildly challenging terrain, like a small creek). Boil water in a plastic bottle. Find bugs and worms and cook them and eat them. Make up songs about the scout leaders and sing then at full volume around ...


1

I have cooked for 19 people on a five day trip around Stewart Island in New Zealand. We were eating dehydrated meals (from Backcountry), so our cooking requirements were three large billies and cookers to boil lots of water. Pretty simple stuff. My main advice to you is about serving. The first night, I tried dealing with all the "can I have less of that ...


4

When I went survival camping my troop always pretended that it was a day hike that turned into an overnight survival situation. We only brought what we would normally bring on a one day hike. Obviously we packed huge lunches and brought extra clothes acting all like "My mom sure packed me a big lunch! Maybe I should save most of it for later." Once we got ...


6

"Your [plane/ship] has [crashed in the jungle/sunk near an island]. Here's what you were able to salvage from the wreck. Oh, and $HeaviestKId has broken his leg" In our case we had food but no cooking equipment, i.e. we had to cook bread wrapped round a twig and improvise a frying pan from metal sheet, make a stretcher...


5

Wildcamping is always a lot more interesting than staying on a "safe" campsite with showers, toilets, taps etc. Since you are staying at one of these campsites you could try finding an area that is far away from the facilities to make it seem more remote. If there is a clean enough stream/river/burn nearby you could encourage the scouts to collect water ...


7

I don't know which part of the world you are in, but if it is the United States, and if these are Boy Scouts, then be certain you consult the "Guide to Safe Scouting". You may also want to consult the "Wilderness Survival" merit badge book for some ideas.


17

Get them lost. Basically you want to get them out to where they lose their bearings, and then as a group, get them to find their way home. Good acting helps. If you can pretend you are also lost then they get the mental experience. This is a great way to teach people how to deal with really being lost. There are a couple of key points here, and the ...


13

I would recommend covering some of the following topics: First Aid - focus on how to stabilize an injured person and how to transport them. Teach them how to splint a sprained ankle and treat heat stroke, hypothermia, dehydration, shock, how to stop bleeding, and other basic first aid skills. A good teamwork skill to practice is transporting an injured ...


1

If you are unfamiliar with the Adirondacks (ADK), the term "High Peaks" is the most talked about area for backpacking in the Adirondacks. They are the 46 tallest peaks in New York. Jesse Black's link was great, its provided by the ADK tourism council. The "state government's authoritative" site is a terrible mess for the information you are looking for, but ...


4

Here's what I've done for group camping (both car & canoe camping). Communal food & cooking. It's just easier. Cooking equipment. You bring what you need depending on what food you buy, or buy food that can be cooked with the equipment you have. Some details. Pot/pans. Think about what you may be cooking at the same time. Are you going to boil ...


3

The key here is to plan the meals. If you know all the dinners you will make you will know what pots etc you need. That said: Plates 1 per person + 2 or 3 for cooking purposes Mugs 1 per person, more if oatmeal is a morning thing for you knives, forks, spoons 1 per person wooden spoon, tongs, flipper, ladle (or mug as ladle) according to the meals you plan ...


1

Another two cents (experience: two Philmont expeditions). Do all you can at home to test things. Boots: if you've got a pack, test the boots and break them in with local hikes. This also lets you work out the 'fit' of the pack -- find that sweet spot where the hip belt takes the weight and the shoulders stabilize. Gradually add weight to the pack up to ...


4

Going to make some assumptions here. Communal cooking People bringing own ingredients, contributions Given the two above Reasonably large pot (two liter) Reasonably large pan (more than 8") Grill surface/fuel. It is hard to advise here without knowing more. But something like this coleman would work. If you are SURE you can have a fire, just grab a ...


0

I've been with the Boy Scouts for many years and one thing that we always did when backpacking in remote areas was to not get too cozy. By that I mean don't unpack everything. We always kept as much of our gear as possible in our backpacks so if we needed to leave in a hurry, like if a tornado is coming, all we had to do was break down our tents and sleeping ...


0

Back in the day, they told us to run to a nearby ditch and duck and cover (on the news during tornado warnings and watches). I was in a trailer, with no cellar/basement nearby. Instead of blindly offering that as advice, I thought I'd do a quick google check. My search turned up this nifty article on pros and cons of ditch vs car. Excerpt: Hazards of ...


8

All the other answers are correct and good. Car-Camping If the problem is that you want a realistic test but either (a) do not have much time, or (b) wisely do not want to go out backpacking on a test trip alone, then do a car camping trip as a "dress rehearsal". Find a car-camping site.Preferably in the wild or woods, rather than a developed KOA-stlye ...


12

Most gear you can test out in your house. Take your boots out on any trail, each time you go out pack a little bit more in your pack and get used to the weight. Come up with a good clothing layer system. Make sure you can get your tent set up quickly. There is nothing like setting up in a downpour minutes before sundown. You can practice this inside. Make ...


3

There can't be any general rule on testing equipment but you should have tested at least all the features that you think you will need during your journey. You also do not necessarily have to test all your stuff at once. For "technical" equipment such as tents, stoves and the like, it might be enough to just learn their handling. Nothing is more annoying ...


12

To test your hiking kit/boots to see if it is all comfortable/fits you can do a day walk but carrying your full rucksack and kit (or stuff of similar weight). This will give you a idea of how your kit fits and the difference in hiking with a full rucksack compared to a daysack to help you judge how far you should aim for. Most of your camping kit can be ...


7

I would imagine the "testing" others referred to is suitability for purpose rather than will the gear end up damaged or broken. For example, if using a new tent, have you practiced pitching it at home first rather than waiting until you have to use it while in the middle of nowhere? Or is the stove and cooking equipment you plan to carry able to cope with ...


8

For any reasonable depth (ie. something you'd be willing to dig without specialized machinery), a deeper hole makes for a more stable temperature. The extra mass of soil surrounding your cellar acts to average out temperature changes: shallow burial averages out day-night shifts, while deeper averages out seasonal changes as well. The end result is that a ...


3

Because water evaporates at any temperature over 32 DegF, a swamp cooler or evaporative cooler is possible in any climate that needs cooling (though perhaps not in a powerful enough fashion depending on the cooling required). In a still body of water, the evaporation rate is proportional (in some form) to the humidity of the air, the air temperature, the dew ...


6

In Germany, cheaper pop-up tents like this are quite popular for festivals. I would never buy one, though, for the following reasons: Every tent of those I have seen have been very prone to breaking. A friend of mine just discovered his (brand new one) was broken when he arrived on the campground. Because the poles are fixed inside you can´t even improvise ...


4

I also hadn't thought of tent hire. Quick search gives http://www.tent2hire.co.uk/ and http://www.campinggearhire.co.uk/ for UK services. Cost about £20-30 for a weekend + ~£100 deposit for a 2-3 man tent. The deposit would make me nervous about taking a tent like that to a festival. Depends what sort of festival it is though... As mentioned by Aravona I ...


5

No, it is not true that necessarily the deeper you get the cooler it gets. For really deep holes it is actually the opposite, the deeper you get the warmer the temperature gets. This is called the Geothermal Gradient. This states that temperature goes up 25C per 1KM of depth. For the first couple of meters the temperature will likely drop or raise ...


8

Blacks / Millets do festival pop up tents (take it out the bag and it literally pops up) and pole system tents in your price range by Eurohike and Vango, who are both good well known brands. Bear in mind for that price range I don't see you getting anything that will have brilliant reviews. You'll be able to buy them brand new so shouldn't have to worry ...


0

I would look for a 2 person tent for a single Person. So you have more comfort and also more space for your backpack and things. The shape is not very important for a festival. Only bring some color tapes with you to mark the strings, otherwise all people will walk over and into your strings and then destroy your tent. If you want something that is very ...


1

Most small tents these days are pretty easy to set up, but you will have to do a little more than just "throw it at the ground". :-) In the US, we have a retail chain called Walmart that sells pretty cheap stuff. This is where I would go. I don't think they're in the UK. Maybe you have something similar. Some things to look for: What kind of weather ...



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