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This is an answer I read somewhere else, but haven't tried it myself yet. Take this answer for what it's worth. It was stated that cat litter crystals‎ do a good job of absorbing moisture. They are also available unscented. Obviously too heavy for backpacking, but should work fine for car camping.


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A bear bag is a bag (in my case a stuff sack) that is "bear proof" (aka the bear can't get to it). On the AT you will only run into black bears, and they are little tree climbers. Technically speaking this should be 10 ft off the ground and 4 ft from the trunk of a tree. I've definitely gotten lazy and not followed these directions - but thats the ...


4

There are two types of bear bags. The first is similar to a bear canister but made out of strong cloth (often kevlar) and wire mesh with a metal insert to prevent crushing. The brand I am most familiar with is URSack, although there are probably others of equal quality. These bear bags are slightly lighter than bear canisters (and easier to pack), and pass ...


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Traditionally a bear bag was simply something to hold your food out of reach of bears. This usually meant finding a way to suspend it from a high branch, and in this instance it's usually sufficient for the bag to be waterproof. (With this in mind, some people like to hang the bags "upside down" to prevent rain getting in through the top. Be sure to tie ...


4

I live in New Mexico, and have done lots of hiking all over the state. Several things first. (1) In the northern part of New Mexico (anything north or, say, Socorro, the Forest Service campgrounds will be closed November 1st until April 1st. (2) If not closed, you will generally have to supply your own water. OK - options for you. First, instead of the ...


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I'm not sure how well this meets all your somewhat conflicting criteria, but take a look at Mt Taylor northeast of Grants. Grants is right on the interstate, and its not that far into the national forest to get to a trailhead. The top is about 11,300 feet. While there are some trees right at the top, there are also good open vistas. I'm not so sure about ...


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If you are backpacking or trying to travel light, bring a separate tent for the dog. There are lots of small tents built with this in mind. Even a small tarp will do the trick, if you aren't worried about bugs. A patch of grass under the tarp will make him perfectly happy. (You'll need to use a tie-out if you go with a tarp, of course.) For car camping, we ...


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One very helpful thing is to brush him while you're towel drying. The brushing will help separate the hair to keep it from matting and will allow more air drying to occur. Also, if you use chamois leather to dry him off initially it will keep you from soaking a towel right away. The chamois will absorb a lot of water, but is easily wrung out to absorb ...


3

I agree that the sources on the internet for the GRs (grandes randonnées, the main long-distance trails in France) are a bit old-fashioned, and not ideal for finding routes. However here are some pointers to get you started -- I've linked to pages that might help you but the parent websites are worth a browse. In general French websites assume some ...


0

While on a month long canoe trip we were using well-used tents, a tarp under the tent was usually all that was needed. But we did have a few nights where adding an extra tarp to the inside to keep sleeping bags dry was a great quick fix. Most people on the trip had their own tarps, though we were sharing the camp's tents.



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