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0

It there is a well nearby use it. 1. by dropping sealed and floating containers to water and then using a net to get them back. This works very well with beer cans. 2. Put the food in a bucket and use rope to lower it near the water.


1

If your ambient temperatures (air/water/earth) don't get down below refrigerator temperatures (2-4 C), and in summer I suspect they don't, then the second law of thermodynamics says you can't do this without an energy source. Since electricity is out, you could consider a propane refrigerator.


3

You'll need to do several things: Change your habits and foods Work Combine several techniques First, you need to more carefully consider the necessity of refrigeration. Refrigerators are used to keep food in a "safe" temperature zone where bacteria is less active, and this requires temperatures close to freezing. Passive cooling, such as root cellars ...


11

Although technology has brought us many conveniences most of them require supporting power or other technology. You seem set on refrigeration and you say: "I am willing to go to just about any extent short of buying a fridge and a generator." Perhaps you should consider solar panels (photovoltaic) and an electric refrigerator. Both technologies are ...


12

The first solution that comes to mind is a "zeer", or pot-in-pot refrigerator. However, this functions best in hot and dry environments as it relies on evaporation to work. Such a device is constructed by nesting one clay pot inside another, with a layer of sand between them (about an inch on the bottom, a few inches on the sides). The sand is then soaked ...


8

http://visitadirondacks.com/stay/campgrounds/backcountry-camping-rules-guidelines You only need a permit if your group is 10+ or you are staying in one location for more than 3 days. You don't need reservations for areas which allow primitive camping, but there are some campgrounds which require it. The Adirondacks are composed of a lot of areas with ...


5

Assuming you don't have an outer first tent pitching in the rain comes down to planning and practice. It is actually possible to stay fairly dry if you're organised. There is no sure fire method but there are a few tricks which can help you keep the inner dry. Don't wrap the tent poles up inside the tent, this will force you to unwrap the tent while it's ...


15

For tents that erect outer first, pitching in the rain is no different to any other time, just don't leave the dry inner out in the rain while putting the outer up. The outer will get wet on both sides anyway. To make this easier a bit of forward planning is useful, like pack the inner and outer separately so that you can just leave the inner in the car ...


17

There are all kinds of people who put up the fly first, then crouch under it putting up the inside. It's generally a very unpleasant experience from all I have heard, what with the crouching, crawling, and being rained on at least while getting the fly up. I handle it completely differently, because I have a free standing tent. On arrival at a site the very ...


4

Firstly, if possible, wait a while. Find somewhere to shelter out of the rain, and wait to see if the rain stops. For typical UK summer weather, most heavy rain is only short showers. So it will probably stop raining (or at least ease off) in 10 minutes or so. If its not going to stop raining, you can unpack your tent while under shelter. Then sort out ...


3

In addition to the other answers, if you expect heavy rain (I'm also heading for Snowdonia this weekend...) be careful about the location you choose as well. Avoid places near rivers or streams but also avoid hollows in the ground or the bottom of slopes. Your groundsheet may be waterproof but its sides only extend upwards for a certain length and it is ...


9

The outside of a tent is designed to get wet, the key trick is to keep everything else dry. You will want to pitch the outer first and only then add the inner. The other answer has covered that well. Some more general tips though is to have a look at the base of your inner tent and see how waterproof it is. A lot of ground sheets are not waterproof at all. ...


12

If the poles of your tent attach to the outer you're in luck. Before you go remove the inner from the outer and pack these separately, potentially wrap them in plastic bags or something so they stay dry. Then when you turn up your first task is to get the waterproof outer up as fast as possible. If it rains while you're putting this up, it's fine. Just ...


2

There are quite a number of options, although the 4000 foot requirement pretty much limits it to the White Mountains of NH, the northern Green Mountains of VT, and a few peaks in ME. It's not clear if you want to or need to do a out and back, or if you can spot a car and do a traverse. Here are just a few options that come to mind without looking things up ...


0

One possible route to see waterfalls in White Mountain National Forest: Hike in from the end of Zealand Road to Zealand Falls, then take the Ethan Pond Trail down to Thoreau Falls. Hike out the Ethan Pond Trail and you can get picked up by the AMC shuttle. http://www.outdoors.org/lodging/lodging-shuttle.cfm The drive back would take you through Crawford ...


3

I'll start this as a community wiki and seed it with a few places. While places like Shasta and the Sierra may be within 3 hours drive, this is usually not the case once traffic and speed limits are factored in. Note that nearly all of these sites will require reservations, and may fill up quickly in busy months. Local definitions: Dispersed Camping: ...


2

There are many, many state, national, & BLM parks, reserves, forests, wilderness areas, recreation areas, refuges, & conservation areas with a 3 hour drive. I don't know which ones allow wild camping, but seeing how many of them allow backpacking, I would guess quite a few. You may need a permit first. I wish I could tell you exactly which ones may ...


3

About 20 years ago, I had a whole day free between two business engagements in the Bay area. I stumbled upon a apparently little-known state park that if I remember right was south and a little east of the built-up area. I think it was called Henry W. Coe State Park. It was mostly in the hills east of the valley. I remember being surprised how few people ...


2

Romania: I have some experiences here, and I can say that wild camping is permitted, unless it is someone's land surrounded by a fence, however loose or abandoned it may seem (although in Romania you can never know who owns which patch of land, but mostly it is safe and fine). There are plenty of good places for wild camping, especially if you get a bit away ...


1

First thing you should do is confirm the validity of the news. Assuming that the news is genuine: Report your location to some one sitting out safe who can coordinate a rescue once it is all sorted out. If you are car-camping, take a measure if you can drive away before it hits. If you don't think you can, get away from Cars as soon as you can. If you ...


1

The tent and the canoe are both objects that can catch wind. Tornadoes can generate winds in excess of 200 MPH and can throw cars. You would want to avoid being in either. Securing as much gear as possible is good common sense, but think about your safety and the safety of your party first.


9

The general guideline for tornado safety is to get as low to the ground as possible and assume the tornado safety crouch: Wind speeds will be slower close to the ground, you are less likely to be hit by a flying object, and are less of a target for lightning strikes. In the same vein, it is best to avoid stands of trees if possible because the risk of ...


1

It's legal to camp almost everywhere in the Czech and Slovak Republics except national parks. You are not allowed to make a campfire closer than 50 m from the forest. Although there is a little possibility to be fined.


4

I use to pitch my ten in such a way that I can use the surrounding vegetation as anchors, or build small metal screens to put around the ground spike and line.


3

I do both. I use some Tyvek I got from a construction site (one of the workers rolling the outside of the house gave me enough for inside and outside for $5!). I use the outside liner to protect my tent from sticks and other sharp objects that can puncture the floor. On the inside I use it, well, because I can be a bit of a pig, I suppose. Dirt, crumbs, etc ...


3

I think you are correct and what you see it is the polyurethane coating chemically breaking down. Warm or damp conditions will accelerate this. An example image is displayed on the Outdoor Gear Lab tent-buying page under the section discussing polyurethane coatings. Usually this means it's time to get a new tent, although there is one thing you can try. ...


4

I regularly take my two medium-sized dogs car camping and keep them inside the tent with me. I initially took them on a practice trip to a nearby park and let them sleep in the tent with me. The dogs tore holes in the mesh because they kept trying to go after animals. We learned two lessons: Dogs that can see out want to get out. We put the rain fly on and ...



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