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12

In both the U.S. and Canada, amateur radio operators serve an important role in providing emergency radio communications during war, disaster, terrorist attack, or whatever other emergency. So amateur radio operators take an extremely dim view of unlicensed operators using frequencies allocated to amateur (or sometimes commercial) radio. Many will even hunt ...


12

National parks tend to be absolutely open to anyone, their goal being to allow public enjoyment without compromising the area for future generations. From the park's own website: A permit is not required for front-country camping, hiking, moorage, etc. in most parks. Campsite reservations are accepted at many front-country parks. To be absolutely ...


9

I have phoned with the trail reservation office for Jasper National Park, and this is what they told me. The route has been decommisioned. This means that it is now considered wildland. Hiking and camping are permitted but require significantly more skills (and some more equipment) than hiking on a well-maintained "semi-primitive" trail. A backcountry ...


8

For any reasonable depth (ie. something you'd be willing to dig without specialized machinery), a deeper hole makes for a more stable temperature. The extra mass of soil surrounding your cellar acts to average out temperature changes: shallow burial averages out day-night shifts, while deeper averages out seasonal changes as well. The end result is that a ...


8

The answer is no, you may only camp in designated areas. Camping is only allowed in designated areas at Jasper park. If you contact the park directly by e-mail the answer is the following: In Jasper National Park, when hikers are hiking on trails they must camp in the designated backcountry campsites only. From the official Parks Canada Backcountry ...


7

No, there won't be anything electrical. A front country kitchen will usually contain: a wood burning stove 2-4 picnic tables food storage lockers a bear proof trash container (nearby) Depending on the park there may be a woodpile next to the kitchen. Food storage lockers are also dependant on the park and the wild life situation (e.g. bears, racoons), ...


7

The answer is usually no, but there may be some restrictions depending on exactly where you're going. Most logging roads are on crown land. The use of forest roads is managed through road abandonment, road decommissioning (making it impassable) and road access controls (i.e. signage, gates, etc.). In Ontario, public access to Crown land is restricted for a ...


7

I did a lot of swimming in NW Ontario when I was a kid, and I've spent more time swimming in lakes and rivers than I have in swimming pools. I find the phrasing of this question curious, because I've never heard any one use the words "wild swimming" nor have I ever considered swimming in a mountain lake or a river "wild". None the less, there are some ...


7

It's when you're moving quickly and quietly along the trail that you're most likely to encounter a bear in the Rockies, and that's because they're easier to sneak up on that way. I run into more bears when I'm on my mountain bike than when I'm hiking. Large predators use trails as often as people do. If you're not making enough noises to identify yourself ...


6

As I understand it the permits have a couple of goals: It's a revenue stream to pay for the maintenance of the areas It's a way of controlling numbers It's a way of enforcing that the person with the permit has an understanding of the activity they are undertaking and has agreed to some kind of terms and conditions for said activity, it also means that if ...


5

I can't answer for Ontario or that route specifically, but only give you a general idea how private property and trespassing works in the US and Canada. You are right in that we don't have Allemansrecht here, and you have to be aware of that. Legally, in many places you are allowed to walk or ride a bike on a established path as long as there is no ...


5

At the federal level your best bet is either Parks Canada or the Canadian Forest Service, which is part of Natural Resources Canada, which also has tons of other relevant areas such as maps and map data. At the provincial level there is a whole gamut of environment, forestry and fishery departments.


5

I don't have my copy of How to Survive in Avalanche Terrain in front of me, but one of the things that stood out to me relating to this is the wide variety of avalanche climates that exists not just from country to country but from mountain to mountain. You've got intermountain, continental, and maritime avalanche climates all with their own habits and ...


5

Two parts to your question, and two parts to my answer. First, how can you plan your route lake by lake when you don't know the weather etc? You plan for somewhat shorter days, and deal with delays by having longer days. We typically plan for 6 hours of paddling - push off at 10 after breakfast, land at 4. On a crappy day we might not land until 6 or 7. We ...


5

No, it is not true that necessarily the deeper you get the cooler it gets. For really deep holes it is actually the opposite, the deeper you get the warmer the temperature gets. This is called the Geothermal Gradient. This states that temperature goes up 25C per 1KM of depth. For the first couple of meters the temperature will likely drop or raise ...


5

Canada does not really have any hard and fast rules, with regard to knives. Specifically, except for lists of a few specifically banned styles they do not even mention them. And something that must be kept at the top of your mind at all times is that a knife is not necessarily a weapon. There are specific lists and descriptions, but suffice it to say you ...


5

You might consider .. The C&O canal on the Maryland side of the Potomac starts in harpers ferry ( accessible by rail on Amtrak) and goes to Georgetown DC just past the Key bridge. The end is literally a 1 hour walk back to union station. It can be a week if you want. It is one of the greatest isolated bike paths in the world. until you get to ...


4

This is in fact an annoying feature of Provincial and Federal parks in Canada. I do not know of any which do not have those rules. In fact, even if you are hiking the IAT, a 3000km hike, you must reserve in advance for the Gaspesie National Park in Quebec. I believe it is fair to assume that the New-Brunswick IAT portion traverses crown lands. In which ...


4

I live in Banff National Park and go backcountry camping on a regular basis. Peak season for Banff, Kootenay, Jasper, Glacier, Yoho, and Revelstoke (and really, pretty much any Canadian National Park) are July and August. That said, it's also usually the best time to camp, as the weather is mild, the trails are at their best, and there is less chance of ...


4

I did find ethanol at Canadian Tire (in downtown Toronto). However, they only had a large bottle (almost 4L), so it's not suitable if one is already on their way; you should still get a smaller bottle and find a place to store the larger container.


4

The way to get started is to swim in areas that are marked as generally safe. These will typically be a sandy beach on the shores of a small lake. Provincial Parks generally have one of these with float lines marking the "safe" areas. As you can see, you're free to swim outside the lines if you want to. From http://www.ontarioparks.com/park/mikisew There ...


4

Nordegg has a via ferrata that was set up by COE, the owner Mike Adolph "...recommends anyone using the via ferrata to do so through a guide, although if a climber shows up with a helmet and the correct harness and clips, they could go solo." Mt. Nimbus, BC has a via ferrata run by CMH. CMH says that "while the public could, in theory, access Mt Nimbus, ...


4

The Milepost Guidebook has a list of points of interest along the Stewart-Cassiar Highway, which includes campgrounds. J 2.5 Cassiar RV Park to west. J 96.5 Meziadin Lake Provincial Park; camping. J 97.5 Meziadin Junction. Junction with BC Highway 37A which leads west 38 miles to 5th Avenue, the main street of STEWART, BC (pop. 699). Road ...


3

Since the snow has been quite light in BC this year, Garibaldi should be okish mid June, unless you wish to go all the way up to Black Tusk. The valley and lakes below Black Tusk should be ok, i.e. there may be snow but you should be able to hike without snowshoes. However be aware that Garibaldi is a very popular destination and there will definately be ...


3

You need to distinguish between a backcountry campground - a bunch of sites together - and a backcountry campsite. In Algonquin, while you may only camp on designated sites, you are all alone as though you had chosen a random place. You reserve a particular lake, which could have anywhere from a handful to dozens of sites on it, each night, but you choose ...


3

I can't speak for Jasper National Park, although you'll want to check out this page on warnings and closures regularly, but for Banff National Park the two areas that are commonly restricted to group access are Moraine Lake/Larch Valley/Sentinel Pass/Mt. Temple/Paradise Valley area (groups of 4 minimum, from mid-July to early October) and the Minnewanka/Mt. ...


3

Excluding the legality question, as to be honest, that's likely to depend on who detects you, and how much it interferes with licensed traffic, the safety angle has a couple of aspects: It doesn't look like you will clash with emergency services, however there is a risk that you will clash with local amateur radio operators who may be handling emergency ...


3

There are really no general principles. Some permits are free and self-issued: you pick up a form at the trailhead and fill it out. This is really more of a registration system, so that the authorities know who is out there, but it's still required. Example. Some permits are automatically issued to anyone who pays a fee, so it's really a way of ...


3

Rainfall in Banff/Lake Louise is pretty low in September. Thunderstorms are much rarer in the Canadian Rockies than in the rest of Canada. I've lived in Banff for six years and there have only been thunderstorms three times in that period. That said, avoid high mountain-exposure in the event of a thunderstorm. It's pretty much guaranteed to snow at least ...


3

I would suggest for you to attach some kind of small bells or something that will produce noise, on the shoes, hands, and your belt. Mobile would not be recomended because battery might die on your trip. So every time you run it will signal every one in the nature, HERE I AM. After some time you will not notice the sounds.



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