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12

National parks tend to be absolutely open to anyone, their goal being to allow public enjoyment without compromising the area for future generations. From the park's own website: A permit is not required for front-country camping, hiking, moorage, etc. in most parks. Campsite reservations are accepted at many front-country parks. To be absolutely ...


11

In both the U.S. and Canada, amateur radio operators serve an important role in providing emergency radio communications during war, disaster, terrorist attack, or whatever other emergency. So amateur radio operators take an extremely dim view of unlicensed operators using frequencies allocated to amateur (or sometimes commercial) radio. Many will even hunt ...


8

I have phoned with the trail reservation office for Jasper National Park, and this is what they told me. The route has been decommisioned. This means that it is now considered wildland. Hiking and camping are permitted but require significantly more skills (and some more equipment) than hiking on a well-maintained "semi-primitive" trail. A backcountry ...


8

For any reasonable depth (ie. something you'd be willing to dig without specialized machinery), a deeper hole makes for a more stable temperature. The extra mass of soil surrounding your cellar acts to average out temperature changes: shallow burial averages out day-night shifts, while deeper averages out seasonal changes as well. The end result is that a ...


8

The answer is no, you may only camp in designated areas. Camping is only allowed in designated areas at Jasper park. If you contact the park directly by e-mail the answer is the following: In Jasper National Park, when hikers are hiking on trails they must camp in the designated backcountry campsites only. From the official Parks Canada Backcountry ...


7

No, there won't be anything electrical. A front country kitchen will usually contain: a wood burning stove 2-4 picnic tables food storage lockers a bear proof trash container (nearby) Depending on the park there may be a woodpile next to the kitchen. Food storage lockers are also dependant on the park and the wild life situation (e.g. bears, racoons), ...


6

As I understand it the permits have a couple of goals: It's a revenue stream to pay for the maintenance of the areas It's a way of controlling numbers It's a way of enforcing that the person with the permit has an understanding of the activity they are undertaking and has agreed to some kind of terms and conditions for said activity, it also means that if ...


5

At the federal level your best bet is either Parks Canada or the Canadian Forest Service, which is part of Natural Resources Canada, which also has tons of other relevant areas such as maps and map data. At the provincial level there is a whole gamut of environment, forestry and fishery departments.


5

Two parts to your question, and two parts to my answer. First, how can you plan your route lake by lake when you don't know the weather etc? You plan for somewhat shorter days, and deal with delays by having longer days. We typically plan for 6 hours of paddling - push off at 10 after breakfast, land at 4. On a crappy day we might not land until 6 or 7. We ...


5

No, it is not true that necessarily the deeper you get the cooler it gets. For really deep holes it is actually the opposite, the deeper you get the warmer the temperature gets. This is called the Geothermal Gradient. This states that temperature goes up 25C per 1KM of depth. For the first couple of meters the temperature will likely drop or raise ...


5

Canada does not really have any hard and fast rules, with regard to knives. Specifically, except for lists of a few specifically banned styles they do not even mention them. And something that must be kept at the top of your mind at all times is that a knife is not necessarily a weapon. There are specific lists and descriptions, but suffice it to say you ...


4

This is in fact an annoying feature of Provincial and Federal parks in Canada. I do not know of any which do not have those rules. In fact, even if you are hiking the IAT, a 3000km hike, you must reserve in advance for the Gaspesie National Park in Quebec. I believe it is fair to assume that the New-Brunswick IAT portion traverses crown lands. In which ...


4

I live in Banff National Park and go backcountry camping on a regular basis. Peak season for Banff, Kootenay, Jasper, Glacier, Yoho, and Revelstoke (and really, pretty much any Canadian National Park) are July and August. That said, it's also usually the best time to camp, as the weather is mild, the trails are at their best, and there is less chance of ...


4

I did find ethanol at Canadian Tire (in downtown Toronto). However, they only had a large bottle (almost 4L), so it's not suitable if one is already on their way; you should still get a smaller bottle and find a place to store the larger container.


3

You need to distinguish between a backcountry campground - a bunch of sites together - and a backcountry campsite. In Algonquin, while you may only camp on designated sites, you are all alone as though you had chosen a random place. You reserve a particular lake, which could have anywhere from a handful to dozens of sites on it, each night, but you choose ...


3

I can't speak for Jasper National Park, although you'll want to check out this page on warnings and closures regularly, but for Banff National Park the two areas that are commonly restricted to group access are Moraine Lake/Larch Valley/Sentinel Pass/Mt. Temple/Paradise Valley area (groups of 4 minimum, from mid-July to early October) and the Minnewanka/Mt. ...


3

Excluding the legality question, as to be honest, that's likely to depend on who detects you, and how much it interferes with licensed traffic, the safety angle has a couple of aspects: It doesn't look like you will clash with emergency services, however there is a risk that you will clash with local amateur radio operators who may be handling emergency ...


3

There are really no general principles. Some permits are free and self-issued: you pick up a form at the trailhead and fill it out. This is really more of a registration system, so that the authorities know who is out there, but it's still required. Example. Some permits are automatically issued to anyone who pays a fee, so it's really a way of ...


3

Rainfall in Banff/Lake Louise is pretty low in September. Thunderstorms are much rarer in the Canadian Rockies than in the rest of Canada. I've lived in Banff for six years and there have only been thunderstorms three times in that period. That said, avoid high mountain-exposure in the event of a thunderstorm. It's pretty much guaranteed to snow at least ...


2

I don't have a lot of experience in this field, but yes, Parks Canada has designated back country camping locations in most of its parks. Crown land camping can be done in almost any province. Rules vary by province, here's Ontario for example. I know that in BC you can camp on most logging roads, sometimes for free, sometimes you pay at designated sites, ...


1

Provincial park statistics: Québec Ontario British Columbia Nova Scotia Alberta Saskatchewan



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