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44

To answer my own question. I checked it with different dealers and experts, and all of them told that if I want to use it on regular basis, I should consider inflatables as toys. Also here in Switzerland it counts as flotation device and is not allowed more than 150 meters offshore. I bought myself a hardshell kayak for about 300$ more and next Monday I ...


14

This answer is based on a 17 foot plastic Coleman canoe with an aluminum frame. The length and the plastic increase the challenges. I have over 100 miles experience now, with legs of 14 to 15 miles. After much online research I purchased a Seattle Sports All Terrain Canoe Center Cart there is an option that includes a tow bar to connect it to your bike, ...


11

I have a 17.5' Clipper Tripper, and I live in Southern Alberta, which means I sometimes get caught on the water in Chinook winds (90km gusts), I know what it feels like to get tossed around in the wind like a wind sock. Unless you have a heavy load to keep the bow down, or someone in the bow that can help you out, your best option is to paddle the canoe ...


10

This answer is focused to a bike and canoe combination. This answer began as a an internet search, but I have completed all of the legs by bike and/or canoe. No Warranty on the information is implied here, it represents my findings at the time each piece was written. The bike trail is generally rails to trails, the trail generally well above the river ...


10

They sell fiberglass repair kits at most boating stores which are made for this exact sort of repair. It includes a fiber glass cloth which you put over the damaged area, as well as a resin / hardening agent to hold the patch in place. Any kit you buy should have instructions for applying the patch in it.


8

As requested, I'll give a run-down of why I am so happy with and constantly recommend the WIKE company's Woody Wagon Canoe Bicycle Trailer. I really like the DIY approach as well, but if you are going to buy something I think this is the one. I have owned one for three years now and in the summers use it several times a week. It was the only system I could ...


8

Upstreampaddling can be very exhausting, but in genereal it's more predictable than paddling downstream. I got my knowledge purely out of experience and not out of books, i paddled down the whole Rhine and in the process of it i had to change direction a few times, so i'll try to provide you with a rundown of the essential learnings. A River just flows ...


7

During the trip: duct tape. It's strong and flexible and it's easy to carry 3 or 4 feet with you. I've used it to repair a yoke in the middle of nowhere. Once you're home: a little fiberglass cloth and some epoxy resin. Or if it's more a deep scratch than a gouge, just the resin.


6

Bears don't generally like people, and the ones who do are usually going to be more interested in dumpsters and campgrounds than a random boat on the river. The likelihood of ever getting into a situation where you have to fend off a bear attack on the water is absurdly small. Bears are usually either crossing water to get somewhere else and want nothing to ...


6

These are main things that you would do. For most flow: Paddle upstream: What you'll do most of the time when there isn't much flow. Eddy-hop: Moving between the relatively still/upstream flowing parts of the river - they usually occur around bends at the sides of the river, outcrops rock in the middle of the flow or sides or, at nodes in waves(and the ...


6

Overall I think you should be okay with just making sure that the contact points on the oars are a bit padded, or at least, the contact point is not sharp. That way it shouldn't rub on the oar and degrade or scratch the finish. Rubber is a common way to keep oars in place without scratching the finish. You could consider using guitar hooks to keep them in ...


6

I don't have specific numbers on strength and duarability, but I have had both and repaired both rather often. I work with a scout troop that has currently 22 floating canoes. The protector we put on both is the same, the hole repair method is the same the only real difference is when you dent or completely wrap the Royalite canoe around a rock. With the ...


5

With a straght shaft paddle, one of two strokes is common: you put the paddle in the water ahead of you sloped like this \ and don't get great efficiency on the first half of the stroke, because it's hard to pull something down when you're above it you skip that whole first half of the stroke and just put the paddle in vertically right next to you. Now ...


5

Oh....you don't. It would only be a matter of luck, physical strength and breath holding capacity...much emphasis on luck. I was once kayaking with my GF in Florida when I was in my early 20s and still very althletic ally capable. We kayaked through a tidal creek, and the tide was on its way out. We were drifting down stream. The river looks navigable for ...


5

In my experience, and from what I've heard from my whitewater canoeing friends, the best thing to do when handling a canoe in rough conditions is to kneel in the middle. This will a) bring the bow down b) bring your paddling position closer to the front, giving you more torque and precision in the direction of the bow c) lower your center of gravity, ...


5

I looked into this a while ago when I was planning on making my own sailing rig for my canoe. The answer largely depends on the size of your sail, and whether or not you have a prominent keel, but if you want to put your paddle away and actually sail your canoe, then you need both a outriggers and leeboards. I've been looking at getting this kit for my ...


4

I'll share what thoughts I had in the moment, and after, while reflecting on the matter: My first thought I've already mentioned in the question, being that the bear was slow and we were fast in our 17.5ft Kevlar Clipper Tripper, so we could have speedily paddled away no problem. But what if we were in a situation where a swift getaway wasn't an option, ...


4

While I was crossing a stream, I was caught in one such but not so serious kind of a strainer. We call that strainers. These are formed when some obstacles get piled up and let a very narrow window for a person to pass through, but the water pass through it. Most of the strainers that you will (unfortunately) come across are likely to be formed by trees and ...


4

This answer is focused to a bike and canoe combination. Camping areas appear to be appropriate but I have not contacted or visited them. It is the result of several hours searching the internet, I have not been to any of these locations in person. No warranty is made about the accuracy of the information but all appears to be correct. The Ohio River ...


4

This Interactive Map Tool pinpoints all locks and dams, as well as paddling access and amenities, including boat launches on the Ohio River: There are at least two tenting campgrounds by the water about halfway between Pittsburg and Wheeling near East Liverpool: Smiths Landing Campground & Yellow Creek. Then another just past Wheeling: DC Ventures. ...


3

From your link, the manufacturer's claim is The blade of the paddle is offset from the shaft to allow the blade to remain vertical to the canoe's path throughout the stroke. This improves the efficiency of each stroke and allows shorter strokes at an increased stroke rate. I haven't used one, but I can see how that could help - a higher stroke ...


3

If you were a voyageur, among your most important equipment would be your fellow voyageurs and a larger boat so as to hold them all. Assuming you're a little more modern and have a 16 or so foot boat with two paddlers, you get upriver by: paddling somewhat harder than you do on flatwater choosing a river that doesn't flow at you too hard lining up stubborn ...


2

The point of the bent shaft is to maximize the amount of stroke for which the paddle is vertical through the stroke. Take a look at this video. The logic is explain in this video. He does a good job of visually showing why you might choose a bent shaft paddle. He also explains that it is not good for all types of canoeing.


2

Using Google Maps, with Bicycling as the transportation mode (August 2015). I was able to identify about 111 miles of dedicated bike paths and a few bike friendly roads that fairly closely parallel the Ohio River. Local area paths that have less than about 2 miles and not connecting to bike friendly roads near the river, are ignored in this answer. At this ...


2

I used a "rocket stove" on a long wilderness survival trip. That stove was also heavy and very efficient in burning "found wood." It made good sense for a fixed camp. In my opinion it would be far too bulky and heavy for either biking or canoeing and certainly backpacking. On that trip, and others, I used solar chargers for electronics. I think solar ...


1

I have not actually had a sailing canoe in the water, but I have looked at a bunch of pictures and videos. Almost every leeboard you see on a canoe is hinged so it will raise up when there is an obstruction. When the canoe gets up any speed then the water becomes an obstruction, this video is for an add on sail kit maker for canoes. Notice that when the ...


1

I would recommend a soft open frameless pack, like a Duluth, which is made of canvas. We can fit three food barrels into our Duluth, but they are olive barrels (watertight) not the standard blue ones. I looked at the 115 L dry bags on the MEC site and it looks like your barrel might just squeeze into one, though paying for a drybag and then putting something ...



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