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20

Just about any car can handle a good gravel road, with the notable exception being low slung performance cars (cars with very little ground clearance). That being said, "gravel roads" vary a LOT. I have seen roads that were the next thing to pavement and gravel roads that had rock gullies which could and would take out your oil pan if you dropped a tire ...


17

I'm from British Columbia, lots of BC is technically a rain forest, which pretty much means you're always starting your fire with wet wood. The trick to getting wet wood to light is to generate a lot of heat when you first start your fire, that means using lots of extra kindling. Cut triple or quadruple the amount of fine kindling and build yourself a ...


13

35° is 35°, whether in your car, in your pack, or in your refrigerator back home. However, handling raw meat otherwise is very different outdoors than at home. Personally, I think bringing raw meat into the wilderness is a bad idea. There are plenty of other foods that give you the same or better nutrition, don't require as careful handling, weigh ...


12

My wife & I are both in our mid-50's, and we stopped going car camping a few years ago largely because of the lack of sleep and difficulty getting into and out of our tent. Our last trip we were so tired that I was hallucinating on the drive back home & we had to pull over on a mountain road to take a nap before we carried on. Even the nice ...


11

The single most important consideration for your parents is going to be their comfort. For starters they must have something comfortable to sleep on or they're going to spend every day achy and tired, wishing they were sleeping in their own beds. The older you get, the more precious sleep is. If they can't get a good, comfortable night's sleep, then they ...


8

If your parents gear worked for them 10 or 15 years ago. If the gear has not seen significant wear in storage. If your parents have remained in nearly the same physical condition (or better) as 10 years ago. The only thing they need to do is load their gear in the car and go. Seriously, it worked then, it should work now. Much of the older gear is ...


8

You say car camping - does that exclude a caravan ? A caravan is a significant investment in cost to buy. There may be somewhere near you that hires/leases/rents them. Plus you'll need a tow fitting on your car rated for the weight of a towed caravan. Electric cars cannot be fitted with towbars (in New Zealand anyway) Some of the places you have camped ...


8

I can give you first hand experience with this. I have visited Goose Lake (and the Mount St Helens museum separately) over 5 times in the last 2 years. We drive a 2001 Dodge Grand Caravan with camping stuff and 3 kids in the back. The road is very well maintained, with few potholes. I'd rank it (on roughness) just below a newly tarred and rocked side ...


7

Since you didn't limit the question to materials found in nature: I've lit wet firewood in the rain using pieces of waxed cardboard. They burn very fast and hot. And wax firestarters are essentially waterproof themselves, so they're pretty reliable even in wet conditions. You used to be able to get waxed cardboard from any supermarket, in the form of ...


7

First things first: Has anyone else tried this? No I've not tried it. Would I use a mattress topper while camping No Why? They're heavy and awkward to move in and out of tent they'll absorb water they'y designed to sit on top of a nice flat mattress not a bumpy stone covered field (as you say) they will react differently depending on the ...


6

We used Outdoor/Indoor Protective Flooring interlocking Mats inside the tent ($20) (above ground sheet) insulates, soft enough to sleep on. Toddlers like this from experience (good for naps too) thermal rest (roller mat) $30 -$200 each depending on climate Baby can sleep with lots of cotton blankets wrapped up This mother blogs about it http://...


6

What you want to do seems to be referred to by the Forest Service as "dispersed camping," and you can find a lot of information by googling on that phrase. Different jurisdictions seem to have different rules, but this blog post has a nice attempt to summarize how the rules usually work in national forests and on BLM land. Basically what they seem to want ...


6

Is camping to you about the campsite or the outdoor activities? You've addressed the significant points, but I think the issue can be reduced to two factors: Time required to set up and take down Physical size Canvas will generally lose both due to the added bulk. So why use a canvas tent? As anyone familiar knows, they're amazing when you're inside ...


6

If its true canvas (cotton) and its leaking its pretty much past its best before date and replacement is the most reliable solution. Good news is Canvas takes water proofing products well and as long as its not rotten, should last you a many more seasons with the occasional re coat. Its been a long time since I have had to do a tent or similar. Its best to ...


6

Basically, you have to be excited and welcoming. Encourage them, thats the most important part of it. For me Camping means getting back to the simpler life. Gear: I don't think that you need any sort of a special gear for older people when you are typically car camping. The normal car-camping checklist should do just well. Needless to say, add their daily ...


6

Depending on where you are camping I would recommend a three or four season synthetic sleeping bag. Synthetic bags are generally cheaper and bulkier than down bags for an equivalent warmth. As you are car camping the additional bulk isn't that important. Most of Spain has night temperatures between 5-0 C this time of year so a three season bag should be ...


6

These are common in Australia, where snakes (9 out of the 10 most poisonous in the world) and spiders (another insane number of highly poisonous variety) along with other wild life (Crocodiles?, Bullsharks :) ) make tenting on the ground something for the more adventurous or short term residents of the world. They also have the advantage over RV's in that ...


6

I drove around Namibia in 2011 in a 2000 Ford Focus, put nearly 8,000 miles on that car during that three-and-a-half week trip - and most of that trip was on sand or gravel roads. The car was fine at the end of the trip - a bit dusty, but perfectly serviceable and ran just great. 8 miles (16 in actuality if you ever intend to leave the campsite...) shouldn'...


5

When meteorologists tell you the temperature, likely they mean the temperature more than 1m off the ground in a shaded place (for example in a Stevenson screen). Anything sunlit is likely to be warmer. The ground is likely to be different (warmer or cooler depending what else is going on). You can't assume that just because the weather report for the region ...


5

In most places I think the risk of theft while camping is generally low. People who choose to do camping for their holiday often don't give the impression of having lots of expensive gear. Even if some camping gear is quite expensive you either need specialist knowledge to know its value and/or its resale value is quite low. Added to the relatively low ...


5

I caution against storing the food in your car. Bears have been known to do serious damage to a car trying to get in. Hence Don't eat in the car - ever Do not store food or other items that "smell" open in you car While in transit, store items in sealed containers in your trunk If you are in designated car camping spots, check to see if they have ...


5

Depending on where you are going, there may be options to stay in a canvas tent-cabins, for example these ones in Yosemite. I've done this several times with my parents-in-law. The advantages are: No tent set-up Often real (if basic) beds Sometimes heated Space to stand up Generally these will end up being more expensive on a per-night basis than a ...


5

The main thing is just to do a practise run with their existing kit in the back yard, same way you'd do as someone starting from scratch. Ideally leave the tent up until it rains too, so you can check if it's waterproof. If it all works - don't mess with it. You can't beat familiarity when it comes to pitching tents. If something turns out to be broken, ...


4

Inflatable pillows blow. (Get it? Ha ha! I kill me.) Seriously though - after years of battling inflatables (sticky in hot climes, slippery, hard to breathe when you are face down in them) I've found the most comfy pillow is a fleece jacket rolled loosely in a pillow case. You presumably have extra clothes with you - roll em in there too. For extra comfy - ...


4

Have you tried fitting them both into a single pillowcase? That should keep them together for you. Failing that, if you are car camping, why not just take your normal pillow? Presumably you don't have any weight or space issues. That's what I do when car camping.


4

I've probably been car camping at a public campground a few 100 nights in my life. Of all those, I can only remember having stuff stolen from the campsite once. For some of the early experiences I was too young to remember such things, but I didn't hear any stories of getting ripped off from my parents either. The one time was when my son and I went to ...


4

This summer I went out canoe camping in some light rain that turned into a torrential downpour and wouldn't stop. When it finally did, there was a puddle in the fireplace and we had no dry wood. We had a little paper with us, and we got tinder from the inside of logs, and all those tricks, but nothing worked and we had a small child with us who was getting ...


4

The Milepost Guidebook has a list of points of interest along the Stewart-Cassiar Highway, which includes campgrounds. J 2.5 Cassiar RV Park to west. J 96.5 Meziadin Lake Provincial Park; camping. J 97.5 Meziadin Junction. Junction with BC Highway 37A which leads west 38 miles to 5th Avenue, the main street of STEWART, BC (pop. 699). Road ...


3

You don't mention budget, but a couple things I really like when car camping are: Beautyrest air mattress (about $100). Can be very firm if you like that, and the edges don't collapse like most air mattresses do. It's like a real bed. Does require A/C close by. A tent tall enough to stand in. I'll rough it while backpacking, but I like to be comfortable ...


3

What you want is a so-called 3-way fridge, generally called that in North America at least, because they can generally be powered by 12V, 110V or propane gas. Presumably similar items exist in areas with 220V or other electricity standards, and perhaps other burnable gases like butane... They cool very well, and have a thermostat and will keep things quite ...



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