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20

Just about any car can handle a good gravel road, with the notable exception being low slung performance cars (cars with very little ground clearance). That being said, "gravel roads" vary a LOT. I have seen roads that were the next thing to pavement and gravel roads that had rock gullies which could and would take out your oil pan if you dropped a tire ...


12

My wife & I are both in our mid-50's, and we stopped going car camping a few years ago largely because of the lack of sleep and difficulty getting into and out of our tent. Our last trip we were so tired that I was hallucinating on the drive back home & we had to pull over on a mountain road to take a nap before we carried on. Even the nice ...


11

The single most important consideration for your parents is going to be their comfort. For starters they must have something comfortable to sleep on or they're going to spend every day achy and tired, wishing they were sleeping in their own beds. The older you get, the more precious sleep is. If they can't get a good, comfortable night's sleep, then they ...


8

If your parents gear worked for them 10 or 15 years ago. If the gear has not seen significant wear in storage. If your parents have remained in nearly the same physical condition (or better) as 10 years ago. The only thing they need to do is load their gear in the car and go. Seriously, it worked then, it should work now. Much of the older gear is ...


8

You say car camping - does that exclude a caravan ? A caravan is a significant investment in cost to buy. There may be somewhere near you that hires/leases/rents them. Plus you'll need a tow fitting on your car rated for the weight of a towed caravan. Electric cars cannot be fitted with towbars (in New Zealand anyway) Some of the places you have camped ...


8

I can give you first hand experience with this. I have visited Goose Lake (and the Mount St Helens museum separately) over 5 times in the last 2 years. We drive a 2001 Dodge Grand Caravan with camping stuff and 3 kids in the back. The road is very well maintained, with few potholes. I'd rank it (on roughness) just below a newly tarred and rocked side ...


6

These are common in Australia, where snakes (9 out of the 10 most poisonous in the world) and spiders (another insane number of highly poisonous variety) along with other wild life (Crocodiles?, Bullsharks :) ) make tenting on the ground something for the more adventurous or short term residents of the world. They also have the advantage over RV's in that ...


6

I drove around Namibia in 2011 in a 2000 Ford Focus, put nearly 8,000 miles on that car during that three-and-a-half week trip - and most of that trip was on sand or gravel roads. The car was fine at the end of the trip - a bit dusty, but perfectly serviceable and ran just great. 8 miles (16 in actuality if you ever intend to leave the campsite...) shouldn'...


6

Basically, you have to be excited and welcoming. Encourage them, thats the most important part of it. For me Camping means getting back to the simpler life. Gear: I don't think that you need any sort of a special gear for older people when you are typically car camping. The normal car-camping checklist should do just well. Needless to say, add their daily ...


6

Depending on where you are camping I would recommend a three or four season synthetic sleeping bag. Synthetic bags are generally cheaper and bulkier than down bags for an equivalent warmth. As you are car camping the additional bulk isn't that important. Most of Spain has night temperatures between 5-0 C this time of year so a three season bag should be ...


5

The main thing is just to do a practise run with their existing kit in the back yard, same way you'd do as someone starting from scratch. Ideally leave the tent up until it rains too, so you can check if it's waterproof. If it all works - don't mess with it. You can't beat familiarity when it comes to pitching tents. If something turns out to be broken, ...


5

Depending on where you are going, there may be options to stay in a canvas tent-cabins, for example these ones in Yosemite. I've done this several times with my parents-in-law. The advantages are: No tent set-up Often real (if basic) beds Sometimes heated Space to stand up Generally these will end up being more expensive on a per-night basis than a ...


3

A gravel road is not bad. We have a driveway that is gravel for half of its length, and I estimate we drove at least 275 miles on gravel during the last 5 years of our Volvo's life, when it was 12 to 17 years old. Our neighbors, who share the driveway, drove a similar distance in five years in an old, long, low Cadillac, and continue to do so


3

The obvious disadvantages for these types of tents are that they occupy valuable roof space making mounting racks (e.g., bike, kayak, or gear) more difficult and that you must pack up your tent every time you want to drive someplace. As for advantages, they allow for a smaller footprint then having a car and a separate tent and can be pitched on uneven, ...


3

As with all other kinds of roads, it depends on its condition. The only universal concern with all gravel roads is the incidence of pieces of gravel getting thrown up by the tires and spoiling somebody's wind-shield or paint job. The answer, of course, is to slow down and maintain proper following distance. 10-15 seconds behind the car in front of you ...


3

What sorts of considerations, gear, practices, should I/we/they acquire to help them get back into car camping? Others have covered the questions of comfort well, and I have nothing to add to what has been said about comfort. (I still need only an ensolite pad.) But I can say something about warmth and the need for leisure occupation. Layers become ...


3

My family took my Dad camping for his 80th birthday. We grew up camping with my Mom and Dad but it had been 20-30 years since my Dad had been camping. We brought all of our usual car camping gear for ourselves but we did bring a cot for him. I hate sleeping bags...too confining, so as usual we brought blankets and our own pillows. For his cot, I put ...


2

The most important advice is get a good quality 6-person tent. You don't want to deal with leaks and broken poles with 2 young kids while camping. Since your children are still napping, you want to make sure the tent has great ventilation and look at a tent fan as well. There are a ton of reviews to check out. We are both car campers and backpackers, so ...


1

Most likely, an average car will be able to handle this road without a problem. Growing up, I was on many forest roads throughout Washington, often in a little old Honda Civic. Access roads for campgrounds and trailheads are usually in decent condition. If you get off the "main" forest roads (logging access), all bets are off and road conditions can be much ...



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