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15

A carabiner is designed to be loaded only along the long axis, near the spine (leftmost figure below). It will be weaker in any other direction of stress. Primary long-axis strength should be marked on the carabiner spine with an up-down arrow symbol, and is typically given in kilo-Newtons (one kN equals approximately 225 pounds of force). Cross-loading ...


15

Hanging things on your pack Hanging things on that little loop at the top of your tent (like a nightlight) We use ours to lift and hang our packs As a simple pulley to change direction of a pull (less abrasive to your rope than a tree)


10

As Hillsons suggested a good way to use it, let me put in what I would do: You can use it as a Weight. Simply knot a carabiner to the end of a rope that needs slinging over a pole or onto a roof. The weight helps with accuracy. Clip keys inside backpacks to loops for extra security Link a few together for your kid to play with while you are shopping. ...


9

Give them to those who need them. First of all, novice students in your gym or mountaineering school will be happy to use a bit heavier/older gear, but ease the burden of bying everything for their first trip. Just make sure that carabiners are safe, because the newbies can't tell themselves. Then, any local non-commercial groups, who organize rope fun ...


8

You can largely mitigate the problem by braking to the front and keeping tension on the carabiner throughout by pressing the system away from your body, rather than braking to the side. Nevertheless (as mentioned) these specialized carabiners may add some comfort: Black Diamond Gridlock and Magnetron Gridlock DMM Belay Master C.A.M.P. HMS Belay Lock ...


8

You can drill some holes in your carabiner and use it as handle for mugs and other things in your home you need to lift. mug example


8

You probably already do this, but make sure you mark all 'retired' carabiners with their own color of tape so that you never accidentally climb with one. Then let the fun begin. If you do any backpacking, they are extremely useful for attaching things to your backpack. A few other favorites: dog leashes, making clotheslines, or use with hammocks. If ...


7

It represents a two major things. I'm not going to illustrate, but the core of it is: Don't load carabiners across the gate or spine side of the carbiner (i.e. the side opposite the gate). This is pretty obvious, but happens sometimes when you make an anchor or whip out a quick draw and then load it without getting all the carabiners in-line with the ...


7

Obsolete biners are very useful for retreating. I've you've retired them because: made obsolete by an upgrade. and they are generally solid. Then it's well worth dragging a few of these along on climbs you're worried you may not be able to complete. I've been welcome of some old steel biners when retreating off of climbs in the past. They're solid and ...


6

This is probably going to be an unpopular opinion because it's not nearly as "feel good" as helping remote Asian herdsmen. (Which incidentally is probably one of few exceptions to what follows.) Nevertheless: It is my belief that unsafe carabiners should be destroyed. In my opinion it is too great a risk that someone will get ahold of one and see that it ...


6

If you're handy with welding (or a drill and screws, brackets, or a hot glue gun), you can make a pretty cool coat rack or key rack out of old carabiners. You can remove the gate for a coat rack by knocking or drilling or cutting off the pins, or leave them on if you're making a key holder. Just attached the carabiners with the hook down and out from the ...


6

Keeping some outward tension on the belay device really helps. If you're toprope belaying you should already be doing this, if you're lead belaying basically keep the climber locked off unless you are feeding slack. The other important factor is to make sure your belay device is through the belay loop, not the two tie-in points. All harness manufacturers ...


6

If you want to store your hiking poles on the outside of your pack I find a carabiner works quite well as a stirrup for holding the lower parts of the poles. I also put a lot of my loose items on one in the top pouch of my pack including, headlamp, lighter (on a keychain ring), multi-tool, flashlight, keys, etc. Easier to add/remove items than on those ...


5

I think this depends on what exactly you want the carabiners for. Most hardware stores carry a variety of carabiners in a range of sizes, weights, and purposes. The "S-Biner", for example, is a cheap, stainless steel multi-purpose clip. I use them for all sorts of household things and while camping, but there aren't really any ways to use them climbing. ...


4

Store your sandals or boots on the hip belt of your pack, while walking barefoot. Hook small items to your pants belt rings - while camping or in the city. Hook the nylon pouch, used to collect rubbish, to a tree branch (no one will step in it). Secure your travel mug to the exterior of the backpack for easy access and "mountain guy" look.


3

A nalgene water bottle holder! You can then clip it to the back of your pack, and it helps with carrying it around! You may want to decorate yours though. Also caribiners are nice just to always be attached to your backpack for anything with a loop!



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