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10

It's not strictly too soon. I have known plenty of people who camped with a nine month old in rougher conditions than you describe. It's too early if you are not in condition to carry a baby in addition to all of your gear. They make packs specifically for carrying wee ones. That's really the best way to go.


8

Carrying all the gear won't be easy. Whoever has the baby will probably only be able to carry one day's worth of baby stuff and nothing else. Either you get a rucksack carrier as Russell suggested (I recommend this as well, a Deuter kid comfort fitted me and was still usable over age 2), or you wear a daypack as well as a front carrier and have 2 sets of ...


4

Last month I camped with my then-nine-month-old son. This was his second time sleeping in a tent with us, the first time he was four months old. It helps that my family, including our 7- and 9-year old daughters, have been camping in tents since they were infants. I'm not sure what the conditions in a hut are, so I'll give advise for tents which I should ...


4

This is one of those "it depends" answers. Based on my experience growing up in-part in America, with other Americans, going to camp: Size matters. Very big camps end up breaking people out in small groups, and the small groups (and entire large group) may not have award ceremonies. Setting matters. Is this a day camp or a sleep-away camp? How long have ...


3

I have been doing quite a bit a research on rope as I am nearing the completion of my magnificent 40 foot tree swing project. in all that I have gathered from seemingly knowledgeable sources...braided polyester is what you want, for durability, and non-stretch. After that it seems the fallback would be a natural rope fibre requiring replacement at least ...


3

I'd go with either polyester rope or Dyneema cord. Both are resistant to UV and neither rot nor stretch. Dyneema has superior wear resistance and is much stronger by weight, but is probably more expensive. Maybe have a look at an (online) marine store. Other yarns such as polyamide (nylon), polypropylene, etc. tend to have inferior UV resistance. I'd try ...


3

It looks like the entire trail is 631 miles long, so how much experience is needed will depend on where you go. The map does show some Class 3 rapids and portages (which are pretty miserable) but it does look like it would be possible to find an easy stretch of the river with no portages. The main resource that I found for planning the trip is here. As far ...


2

As others suggest, it's almost certainly best to go with a backpack style kid-carrier. One option you might not know about is the Aarn Universal Balance Bag which attaches to your pack. http://www.aarnpacks.com/#!balance-bags/c1paj The balance bag counterbalances the awkward weight of a kid on your back, and gives you easy access to water, maps, hats etc ...


2

The most important advice is get a good quality 6-person tent. You don't want to deal with leaks and broken poles with 2 young kids while camping. Since your children are still napping, you want to make sure the tent has great ventilation and look at a tent fan as well. There are a ton of reviews to check out. We are both car campers and backpackers, so ...


2

This ReserveAmerica article has a lot of good ideas: Bike Riding What better way to explore the region you're camping in than on a bike ride? Strap on your pedaling shoes, and head out for a day of cycling. Whether you prefer mountain biking or street biking, most campgrounds support both camping activities. Don't forget to ask about bike-specific ...


1

Any system which relies on preventing kids form exploring while outdoors seems to be both self-defeating and unlikely to work. My advice is to talk to them about what they should do if they do get lost so they can help in their own rescue. Similarity putting too strong a prohibition on wandering off is only likely to make them more prone to panic and ...



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