Hot answers tagged

17

First, prevention is going to give you the best bang for your buck. Make sure your shoes dry properly between uses by hanging them out, and not keeping them in a bag/trunk/confined space. During your climbing session, it's a good idea to take your shoes off between climbs, or at least once in a while to let them dry out some. For odor control, I find that ...


15

The procedure is roughly the same for both Down and Synthetic, however down requires special precautions: Never dryclean. Wash by hand in a bathtub, or use a front-loading washing machine on gentle cycle. Down bags have thin baffles inside that keep the feathers partitioned. Agitators will put enough stress on the bag you risk tearing those baffles ...


15

In all likelihood, you just need to replace the helmet. Nearly all helmets, climbing and bicycle helmets included, need to be replaced once they become worn or older than 5 years. Ideally, you would track the age of each helmet. If you don't know how old one is and it looks well used, I wouldn't risk it. Stick to gently wiping it with a soft dry cloth. ...


12

I use boot bananas to tame the stench! http://www.bananafingers.co.uk/boot-bananas-p-1654.html Update 26 Nov 2015: I am still using the same bananas I had bought recently to this first post. I think I am on my 3rd pair of climbing shoes and I have not been bothered by the smell of any of them since. Great long lasting product.


12

I'll caveat this with -- I've never vomited in my gear, nor do I know anyone who has. But I did sit and figure out how I'd try to solve this if it happened to me. Dry the liquid. This will depend on gear and season. Sunshine, freezing cold, or dirt can all work for this. Even cooking materials such as flour can work. Anything to make it less liquid. ...


11

CamelBak have a great Care & Tips section on their website. Summarising their recommendations: Keep it clean and dry when not in use. If mould develops: Use hot water and two tablespoons of baking soda or bleach Leave for about 30 minutes Wash with hot water and mild soap Air dry


10

The answer depends on your sccenario, if you have access to an ice bath/cold shower within minutes of your activity that is your best bet as Liam has stated above. However, if you are unable to have an ice bath/cold shower directly following your activity there is an alternative. Some of us may have to take a bus home after the gym, drive our car, or ...


10

Care for your neoprene water shoes as you would for any neoprene wetsuit. http://scubadiverlife.com/2011/03/15/scuba-wetsuit-care-101-removing-odors-extending-suit-life/ You can use any search engine and search for 'wetsuit soap' or 'wetsuit wash' and will find suitable products. Stop by any dive shop where you are travelling and they will likely have ...


9

The two products have some commonality of use but a different focus. Both have their place. Soap is good for many things. Sanitiser is an excellent companion when squatty toilets or dead animals in your water supply must be dealt with - read on ... Soap is used (as I know, you know) for cleaning - it removes contaminants that are hard or essentially ...


9

First of all, check the label for directions. I have a synthetic bag. I take it to the laundromat and wash it in a sufficiently large front-load machine, using cold water and somewhat less detergent than a normal load. I put it in a large dryer set to low or no heat until it seems mostly dry. Then I hang it up indoors for a day or two to finish drying. ...


8

Using Tilex or bleach to eradicate mold is the wrong thing to do. Bleach does nothing to eradicate mold, it simply bleaches the the fabric. If you want to kill mold, then you need to use a product designed specifically for that purpose. I would recommend Concrobium which will do nothing to remove the mold stain, but will kill the mold on contact.


8

My boots are leather, as you've not stated what yours are made of at time of writing, here goes with what I do to clean my boots on walks and to store at home. Firstly for at home I will always leave my boots to dry off usually overnight - just on some newspaper away from any radiators or the fire, slow drying as they are leather. It's easier to remove dry ...


7

From experience with small sections I have used hand sanitizer and it works. My parents used to use baking soda for our pop up camper. It was a thicker material then a tent, but it cleaned and absorbed a lot of sticky substances.


6

Poison oak's "poison" is an oil-based substance; therefore any oil-removing soap will do the trick. Dish soap is a low-cost and easily available substance for cleaning poison oak from skin. This study found that: Dish soap was significantly better than no treatment. Dish soap was not significantly different from two other products (Tecnu, which is much ...


5

I just carry hand sanitizer for three reasons Weight Doesn't require water Environmental contamination (the soap goes somewhere, even if just onto the ground) It's going to come down to personal choice, but when I'm backpacking weight and water are huge concerns (and water is weight).


5

I'm a fan of a cold bath (ice bath if you can stand it). My understanding is that the contraction of the muscles that happens as they get cold forces out things like lactic acid thus improving your recovery and preventing injury. It's not everyone's cup of tea I admit though. Done a quick google on the actual benefit of this and it does seem to have some ...


5

Instead of cleaning them, fill them with cedar balls and hang them. That should eliminate the reek.


5

Leave the filler cap open to allow any water residue inside to evaporate and so the humidity level of the air inside the bladder matches that of the air in the environment around it


5

Mold can be harmful to your health and damage the waterproof fabric of your tent. Mildew stains shouldn't necessarily be removed as it can damage fabrics. However, growth of mold should be stopped. It is best to consult your tent manufacturer documentation to know what's the best treatment for your specific product. According to MSR's How do I prevent ...


5

Tilex or bleach will get rid of mold. It might also affect the water resistance of the tent fabric or change its color, so you might want to test it on a small area first.


5

I will not address the issue of whether the helmet in question is still usable or should be retired but instead answer the main question: How to wash a foam helmet? Generally water must not damage any kind of helmet you want to use for climbing, as it has to be usable in long constant rain. So rinsing with water without additives is certainly save. The ...


5

The magic skunk-smell-be-gone recipe: In a plastic bucket, mix well the following ingredients: 1 quart of 3% Hydrogen Peroxide 1/4 cup of baking soda 1 to 2 teaspoons liquid soap First thing you want to do is get as much of the skunk goo off of you as you can. Using paper towel, tissues, or a rag you can throw away, dab the spray off your skin. Rinsing ...


5

Start by wetting them so you don't get mold into the air. With a weak Lysol solution, scrub them with a toothbrush. Let them dry, and spray them with MiraZyme. Or as ShemSeger says, just get new ones :)


4

I clean it out then leave it to dry for a day or two. But you can never seem to get all of the water out of the hose, so I keep mine in the freezer. At -18 the mold can't grow.


4

They key to all smelly shoes is bacteria. From a prevention perspective, I always wash my feet before they spend a prolonged or arduous of time in shoes or boots. A good spray with an anti-bacteria can do the trick. I've also heard good thing about dusting them with bicarb and then vacuuming it out some time later.


4

It is most likely not sap but the excretion from Aphids (Greenfly). They suck the sap from the tree and then excrete this sticky substance, often called Honeydew. It may be worth contacting the tent manufacturers for advice, but I would suggest careful washing first with just water and if that isn't enough, try with some soap flakes (like Dreft).


4

Be careful to check the health warnings on most sterilizing sprays as most of them state not to get on your skin (I don't wear socks in my climbing shoes). There are also a large number of deodorizers, but they can at times produce a far more distracting scent that will fill a room instead of just filling your shoe. As for freezing your shoes, this can ...


4

There are cleaning kits designed specifically for cleaning hydration packs like Camelbaks: Camelbak also provides cleaning instructions on their website: The best way to care for your reservoir is to clean and dry it after every use, especially if you fill the reservoir with anything other than water. However, theoretically, if someone didn’t ...


4

As noted, the key is removing it quickly. If you like to carry around dishsoap, that will work great. However if you do not regularly carry that around, abrasives are a good alternative. I've effectively used the sand at the bottom of a small waterfall to remove the oils and of the entire hiking group, all of whom realized too late what we'd walked ...



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