Hot answers tagged

20

First, prevention is going to give you the best bang for your buck. Make sure your shoes dry properly between uses by hanging them out, and not keeping them in a bag/trunk/confined space. During your climbing session, it's a good idea to take your shoes off between climbs, or at least once in a while to let them dry out some. For odor control, I find that ...


19

When it's unsuitable for removal by your group, contact the relevant authority for that land and let them know the type of litter and its location (pictures and GPS coordinates are helpful). For example, in cases of extreme littering, U.S. federal land management agencies will sometimes organize major cleanup efforts to pack out trash with mules or even a ...


16

The procedure is roughly the same for both Down and Synthetic, however down requires special precautions: Never dryclean. Wash by hand in a bathtub, or use a front-loading washing machine on gentle cycle. Down bags have thin baffles inside that keep the feathers partitioned. Agitators will put enough stress on the bag you risk tearing those baffles ...


15

CamelBak have a great Care & Tips section on their website. Summarising their recommendations: Keep it clean and dry when not in use. If mould develops: Use hot water and two tablespoons of baking soda or bleach Leave for about 30 minutes Wash with hot water and mild soap Air dry


15

In all likelihood, you just need to replace the helmet. Nearly all helmets, climbing and bicycle helmets included, need to be replaced once they become worn or older than 5 years. Ideally, you would track the age of each helmet. If you don't know how old one is and it looks well used, I wouldn't risk it. Stick to gently wiping it with a soft dry cloth. ...


15

This is what I do: I always have extra carry-bags to keep the trash in. Depending upon what my plans is, suppose if I am coming around the same way back home, I usually pickup everything which shouldn't be out there and place the bag at place wherein it possibly will not be fiddled with. On my way back home, when I know I don't have an extra bag to ...


14

All Gore-Tex products come with care instruction, these should be followed, obviously. It's important to understand how these membranes work, I feel. Many Gore-tex and similar products consist of 3 layers, the first layer (inside the jacket) is designed to protect the Gore tex fabric. The second layer is the actual Gore tex itself The outer layer ...


13

When washing in the backcountry there are some techniques and considerations that will benefit yourself and the pristine wilderness you are traveling within. Don't ever wash near a water source, you are contaminating it for yourself, everyone else, and the animals that drink from it. 1. Always carry water at least 500 feet away from: The source of the ...


13

I use boot bananas to tame the stench! http://www.bananafingers.co.uk/boot-bananas-p-1654.html Update 26 Nov 2015: I am still using the same bananas I had bought recently to this first post. I think I am on my 3rd pair of climbing shoes and I have not been bothered by the smell of any of them since. Great long lasting product.


13

I'll caveat this with -- I've never vomited in my gear, nor do I know anyone who has. But I did sit and figure out how I'd try to solve this if it happened to me. Dry the liquid. This will depend on gear and season. Sunshine, freezing cold, or dirt can all work for this. Even cooking materials such as flour can work. Anything to make it less liquid. ...


13

If the item is small enough to move, but too large to easily carry out. Organize the junk so that it is stacked as inoffensively as practical, but remains easily accessible. Don't hide it or drop it into a ravine, you want to make it easier to remove not harder. Contact the landowner or manager. This might be a park ranger, corporation or private land ...


12

Some methods Alcohol, either hand sanitizer or rubbing alcohol with a microfiber towel to have a "bath" Advantages: Lightweight, fast. Disadvantages: Dries your skin, have to carry the alcohol, and breathing it isn't perfectly healthy. Solar Shower Advantages: Can get pretty darned clean. Disadvantages: You have to carry it, collect water, and even ...


12

When washing rain coats and fleeces I use Nikwax tech wash and reproofer (millets link), on the bottle these say reconmended for Goretex so I assume it's the same. In general with waterproof clothing do not use normal washing powders as these remove the waterproof coating.


11

Normal detergent should be able to break down the poisonous oils in question, it shouldn't require any specialist stuff to remove them. Just be sure of a few things: Wash infected clothes separate from "clean" (i.e. unaffected) ones to eliminate any possible risk of spreading Make especially sure you don't overload the machine - leave plenty of room so the ...


11

Care for your neoprene water shoes as you would for any neoprene wetsuit. http://scubadiverlife.com/2011/03/15/scuba-wetsuit-care-101-removing-odors-extending-suit-life/ You can use any search engine and search for 'wetsuit soap' or 'wetsuit wash' and will find suitable products. Stop by any dive shop where you are travelling and they will likely have some....


11

Simply throwing them in the wash should suffice, but if you want to be extra sure the fungus dies, you could soak your socks in a 1 part bleach to 10 parts water mixture for ten minutes. Keep in mind that it's not your socks you need to worry about so much as your shoes, they're a little more difficult to clean. Try changing your insoles out, they make ...


10

The answer depends on your sccenario, if you have access to an ice bath/cold shower within minutes of your activity that is your best bet as Liam has stated above. However, if you are unable to have an ice bath/cold shower directly following your activity there is an alternative. Some of us may have to take a bus home after the gym, drive our car, or ...


9

First of all, check the label for directions. I have a synthetic bag. I take it to the laundromat and wash it in a sufficiently large front-load machine, using cold water and somewhat less detergent than a normal load. I put it in a large dryer set to low or no heat until it seems mostly dry. Then I hang it up indoors for a day or two to finish drying. ...


9

The two products have some commonality of use but a different focus. Both have their place. Soap is good for many things. Sanitiser is an excellent companion when squatty toilets or dead animals in your water supply must be dealt with - read on ... Soap is used (as I know, you know) for cleaning - it removes contaminants that are hard or essentially ...


9

My boots are leather, as you've not stated what yours are made of at time of writing, here goes with what I do to clean my boots on walks and to store at home. Firstly for at home I will always leave my boots to dry off usually overnight - just on some newspaper away from any radiators or the fire, slow drying as they are leather. It's easier to remove dry ...


8

I trust Arc'teryx's Product Care Information. There's a video to take you through the whole process. And you actually DO want to use the dryer because the heat reactivates the durable water repellant (DWR). DWR is the actual substance/layer that does the water repelling. You can also follow the instructions recommended on the actual GoreTex site: Washing ...


8

Using Tilex or bleach to eradicate mold is the wrong thing to do. Bleach does nothing to eradicate mold, it simply bleaches the the fabric. If you want to kill mold, then you need to use a product designed specifically for that purpose. I would recommend Concrobium which will do nothing to remove the mold stain, but will kill the mold on contact.


8

After a long day on the trail, I'll take my grooming bucket (reused plastic margarine or sherbet container with lid), and go down to the water hole. Collect some water and rinse out the bandana. Start at the head and work my way down/in. I'll pull off my shirt and then wash my torso. Pull off my socks and wash my legs. I then wash my groin area, and ...


7

The best I've found for this sort of thing is normal household bleach - you can dilute it to start with and try it on a small area if you're scared of wrecking the tent. In many cases, working diluted bleach into the fabric is enough and I've personally never had any issues with it removing the waterproof coating.


7

I just couldn't bring myself to bleach my tent. I was too worried it would damage the material. In the end I used Mirazyme and a bathtub. The Mirazyme removed the mildew and airing it out removed the smell. We just mixed it in the ratios listed on the bottle.


7

Leave the filler cap open to allow any water residue inside to evaporate and so the humidity level of the air inside the bladder matches that of the air in the environment around it


7

Rinse your socks and undies out with water, rub them on rocks then re-rinse and wring dry. Put them on damp in the morning. I can't think of a lighter weight solution than that :) I've done plenty of trips with no extra pairs of anything. You certainly won't smell good at the end of 10 days, but I don't think your performance will be affected. Edit: ...


7

From experience with small sections I have used hand sanitizer and it works. My parents used to use baking soda for our pop up camper. It was a thicker material then a tent, but it cleaned and absorbed a lot of sticky substances.


7

Hot Water - needs to be very hot - 140 F (60C) - reported to kill all, but is not good for wool. UV Light - hang out to dry in direct sunshine. Products exist that claim to sterilize shoes using UV light and can be used for socks. Chemicals - Anti fungal Laundry rinse (e.g. Canestan) is effective, Borax etc. Bleach alone does not kill fungus spores. ...



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