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14

First, prevention is going to give you the best bang for your buck. Make sure your shoes dry properly between uses by hanging them out, and not keeping them in a bag/trunk/confined space. During your climbing session, it's a good idea to take your shoes off between climbs, or at least once in a while to let them dry out some. For odor control, I find that ...


14

The procedure is roughly the same for both Down and Synthetic, however down requires special precautions: Never dryclean. Wash by hand in a bathtub, or use a front-loading washing machine on gentle cycle. Down bags have thin baffles inside that keep the feathers partitioned. Agitators will put enough stress on the bag you risk tearing those baffles ...


13

In all likelihood, you just need to replace the helmet. Nearly all helmets, climbing and bicycle helmets included, need to be replaced once they become worn or older than 5 years. Ideally, you would track the age of each helmet. If you don't know how old one is and it looks well used, I wouldn't risk it. Stick to gently wiping it with a soft dry cloth. ...


11

I'll caveat this with -- I've never vomited in my gear, nor do I know anyone who has. But I did sit and figure out how I'd try to solve this if it happened to me. Dry the liquid. This will depend on gear and season. Sunshine, freezing cold, or dirt can all work for this. Even cooking materials such as flour can work. Anything to make it less liquid. ...


10

CamelBak have a great Care & Tips section on their website. Summarising their recommendations: Keep it clean and dry when not in use. If mould develops: Use hot water and two tablespoons of baking soda or bleach Leave for about 30 minutes Wash with hot water and mild soap Air dry


10

The answer depends on your sccenario, if you have access to an ice bath/cold shower within minutes of your activity that is your best bet as Liam has stated above. However, if you are unable to have an ice bath/cold shower directly following your activity there is an alternative. Some of us may have to take a bus home after the gym, drive our car, or ...


9

I use boot bananas to tame the stench! http://www.bananafingers.co.uk/boot-bananas-p-1654.html


9

The two products have some commonality of use but a different focus. Both have their place. Soap is good for many things. Sanitiser is an excellent companion when squatty toilets or dead animals in your water supply must be dealt with - read on ... Soap is used (as I know, you know) for cleaning - it removes contaminants that are hard or essentially ...


8

First of all, check the label for directions. I have a synthetic bag. I take it to the laundromat and wash it in a sufficiently large front-load machine, using cold water and somewhat less detergent than a normal load. I put it in a large dryer set to low or no heat until it seems mostly dry. Then I hang it up indoors for a day or two to finish drying. ...


8

Using Tilex or bleach to eradicate mold is the wrong thing to do. Bleach does nothing to eradicate mold, it simply bleaches the the fabric. If you want to kill mold, then you need to use a product designed specifically for that purpose. I would recommend Concrobium which will do nothing to remove the mold stain, but will kill the mold on contact.


7

From experience with small sections I have used hand sanitizer and it works. My parents used to use baking soda for our pop up camper. It was a thicker material then a tent, but it cleaned and absorbed a lot of sticky substances.


6

My boots are leather, as you've not stated what yours are made of at time of writing, here goes with what I do to clean my boots on walks and to store at home. Firstly for at home I will always leave my boots to dry off usually overnight - just on some newspaper away from any radiators or the fire, slow drying as they are leather. It's easier to remove dry ...


5

Leave the filler cap open to allow any water residue inside to evaporate and so the humidity level of the air inside the bladder matches that of the air in the environment around it


5

Mold can be harmful to your health and damage the waterproof fabric of your tent. Mildew stains shouldn't necessarily be removed as it can damage fabrics. However, growth of mold should be stopped. It is best to consult your tent manufacturer documentation to know what's the best treatment for your specific product. According to MSR's How do I prevent ...


5

Tilex or bleach will get rid of mold. It might also affect the water resistance of the tent fabric or change its color, so you might want to test it on a small area first.


5

I just carry hand sanitizer for three reasons Weight Doesn't require water Environmental contamination (the soap goes somewhere, even if just onto the ground) It's going to come down to personal choice, but when I'm backpacking weight and water are huge concerns (and water is weight).


5

The magic skunk-smell-be-gone recipe: In a plastic bucket, mix well the following ingredients: 1 quart of 3% Hydrogen Peroxide 1/4 cup of baking soda 1 to 2 teaspoons liquid soap First thing you want to do is get as much of the skunk goo off of you as you can. Using paper towel, tissues, or a rag you can throw away, dab the spray off your skin. Rinsing ...


5

Poison oak's "poison" is an oil-based substance; therefore any oil-removing soap will do the trick. Dish soap is a low-cost and easily available substance for cleaning poison oak from skin. This study found that: Dish soap was significantly better than no treatment. Dish soap was not significantly different from two other products (Tecnu, which is much ...


4

It is most likely not sap but the excretion from Aphids (Greenfly). They suck the sap from the tree and then excrete this sticky substance, often called Honeydew. It may be worth contacting the tent manufacturers for advice, but I would suggest careful washing first with just water and if that isn't enough, try with some soap flakes (like Dreft).


4

I'm a fan of a cold bath (ice bath if you can stand it). My understanding is that the contraction of the muscles that happens as they get cold forces out things like lactic acid thus improving your recovery and preventing injury. It's not everyone's cup of tea I admit though. Done a quick google on the actual benefit of this and it does seem to have some ...


3

All forms of soap are formed from a combination of natural ingredients. It's best to find soaps that are marketed as "biodegradable" or "natural" - these have the least complex chemical formulas and will be the most nature-friendly. Soap is simple to carry and has many uses. Sanitizer, same.


3

I clean it out then leave it to dry for a day or two. But you can never seem to get all of the water out of the hose, so I keep mine in the freezer. At -18 the mold can't grow.


3

Instead of cleaning them, fill them with cedar balls and hang them. That should eliminate the reek.


3

There are cleaning kits designed specifically for cleaning hydration packs like Camelbaks: Camelbak also provides cleaning instructions on their website: The best way to care for your reservoir is to clean and dry it after every use, especially if you fill the reservoir with anything other than water. However, theoretically, if someone didn’t ...


3

Some options I have used in the past UV Pen - Strong UV Light will kill fungus Anti-Fungal Powder - Works just as well on shoes as it does on toes Anti-Fungal Cream - Same premise


3

Key thing is to get the shoes clean and dry. Wash the shoes at the hottest possible temperature and let them dry thoroughly. (Use a hair dryer on cool/warm setting carefully if needed). Use an anti fungal laundry rinse such as CANESTEN laundry wash if the problem is persistent. Don't wear the same shoes two days in a row - with barefoot shoes look at ...


2

Be careful to check the health warnings on most sterilizing sprays as most of them state not to get on your skin (I don't wear socks in my climbing shoes). There are also a large number of deodorizers, but they can at times produce a far more distracting scent that will fill a room instead of just filling your shoe. As for freezing your shoes, this can ...


2

Kill the bacteria that turns perspiration into a foul smell, sounds crazy but put them in the freezer overnight. This and a through onslaught with any other antibacterial treatments e.g. biological washing powder in luke warm water. As far as I'm aware there is no permanent cure. Do Not put them in the washing machine or use hot water as this may melt the ...


2

A UV-C germicidal light kills the odor-producing bacteria, so used regularly the smelly compounds never build up and your shoes don't stink. It also helps to dry your shoes after use, e.g. in front of a fan. And, as stevemarvell said, wash your feet before you climb. I assembled my own UV-C sterilizer and I can attest that it works. It uses a higher ...



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