Hot answers tagged

18

When it's unsuitable for removal by your group, contact the relevant authority for that land and let them know the type of litter and its location (pictures and GPS coordinates are helpful). For example, in cases of extreme littering, U.S. federal land management agencies will sometimes organize major cleanup efforts to pack out trash with mules or even a ...


15

This is what I do: I always have extra carry-bags to keep the trash in. Depending upon what my plans is, suppose if I am coming around the same way back home, I usually pickup everything which shouldn't be out there and place the bag at place wherein it possibly will not be fiddled with. On my way back home, when I know I don't have an extra bag to ...


12

If the item is small enough to move, but too large to easily carry out. Organize the junk so that it is stacked as inoffensively as practical, but remains easily accessible. Don't hide it or drop it into a ravine, you want to make it easier to remove not harder. Contact the landowner or manager. This might be a park ranger, corporation or private land ...


11

Care for your neoprene water shoes as you would for any neoprene wetsuit. http://scubadiverlife.com/2011/03/15/scuba-wetsuit-care-101-removing-odors-extending-suit-life/ You can use any search engine and search for 'wetsuit soap' or 'wetsuit wash' and will find suitable products. Stop by any dive shop where you are travelling and they will likely have some....


11

Simply throwing them in the wash should suffice, but if you want to be extra sure the fungus dies, you could soak your socks in a 1 part bleach to 10 parts water mixture for ten minutes. Keep in mind that it's not your socks you need to worry about so much as your shoes, they're a little more difficult to clean. Try changing your insoles out, they make ...


7

Hot Water - needs to be very hot - 140 F (60C) - reported to kill all, but is not good for wool. UV Light - hang out to dry in direct sunshine. Products exist that claim to sterilize shoes using UV light and can be used for socks. Chemicals - Anti fungal Laundry rinse (e.g. Canestan) is effective, Borax etc. Bleach alone does not kill fungus spores. ...


5

Start by wetting them so you don't get mold into the air. With a weak Lysol solution, scrub them with a toothbrush. Let them dry, and spray them with MiraZyme. Or as ShemSeger says, just get new ones :)


5

I will not address the issue of whether the helmet in question is still usable or should be retired but instead answer the main question: How to wash a foam helmet? Generally water must not damage any kind of helmet you want to use for climbing, as it has to be usable in long constant rain. So rinsing with water without additives is certainly save. The ...


5

This is country specific - but yours may have some automated way of reporting this. My own little homeland made me proud when they rolled out a smartphone app for hikers that allows to report any kind of environmental damage (along with GPS data and possibly pictures) directly to the authorities. They are usually pretty quick to investigate such things.


5

If it is a more polluted area, try the method suggested by WedaPashi (cleanup activity with friends), or take a look at Let's Do It - a worldwide trash-collecting/volunteering action; find your country and contact the local organization. This also puts the issue in an other light (and on the world map), and it might get bigger media attention too, spread the ...


4

Contact USFS via their website and let them know the location and description of the item. They have a 'Contact Us' link in the About the Agency drop-down menu.


3

I solved the problem with a combination approach. Given that throwing them away was one option, I didn't see the point in trying anything weak. We all know the phrase "kill the mold on your shoes or destroy them trying". These are tough sandals and have seen quite a bit of abuse during the years. I'm a bit emotionally attached, which means that I don't ...


3

Rinsing them in clean water when you are finished using them will definitely help stop them smelling. To deal with the current smell I would just leave them in a sink/bucket of clean water for a couple of hours/overnight. I wouldn't worry too much about drying them as long as they are cleaned. As you said using soap is not a a good idea unless you get ...


2

Apart from what all options suggested by other users here, If you are up for investing a bit, You might want to look out for Neoprene shampoos that are used by Scuba Divers to clean their Scuba suits. The Bacteria and the stinking has a close relation. The other way to go is Vinegar with water. A bucket of water with 2-3 tablespoons of vinegar should do. ...


2

If you cut it up, then many hikers could each take out a piece and eventually the job would be done. Just leave it better than you found it.


1

I agree with the answers that recommend notifying the managers of the land. In addition, if the area is served by a packer, I would notify the packer. The packer might be able to take the trash out in a return trip when his mules were lightly loaded. As James Jenkins said in his answer, organize the junk and put it in an easily accessible place. Packers ...


1

Chlorine Bleach is not good for wool. Found a solution that worked for me - phenolic disinfectant (Lysol) the web site also suggested Pine Oil (Pine Sol or Lysol Pine Action) http://laundry.about.com/od/handwashing/fl/How-to-Wash-Wool-Socks.htm Remember to also disinfect towels, shower shoes/sandals, etc as the athlete's foot fungus can spread via laundry ...



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