Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

In all likelihood, you just need to replace the helmet. Nearly all helmets, climbing and bicycle helmets included, need to be replaced once they become worn or older than 5 years. Ideally, you would track the age of each helmet. If you don't know how old one is and it looks well used, I wouldn't risk it. Stick to gently wiping it with a soft dry cloth. ...


11

I'll caveat this with -- I've never vomited in my gear, nor do I know anyone who has. But I did sit and figure out how I'd try to solve this if it happened to me. Dry the liquid. This will depend on gear and season. Sunshine, freezing cold, or dirt can all work for this. Even cooking materials such as flour can work. Anything to make it less liquid. ...


7

From experience with small sections I have used hand sanitizer and it works. My parents used to use baking soda for our pop up camper. It was a thicker material then a tent, but it cleaned and absorbed a lot of sticky substances.


7

My boots are leather, as you've not stated what yours are made of at time of writing, here goes with what I do to clean my boots on walks and to store at home. Firstly for at home I will always leave my boots to dry off usually overnight - just on some newspaper away from any radiators or the fire, slow drying as they are leather. It's easier to remove dry ...


5

Start by wetting them so you don't get mold into the air. With a weak Lysol solution, scrub them with a toothbrush. Let them dry, and spray them with MiraZyme. Or as ShemSeger says, just get new ones :)


5

Poison oak's "poison" is an oil-based substance; therefore any oil-removing soap will do the trick. Dish soap is a low-cost and easily available substance for cleaning poison oak from skin. This study found that: Dish soap was significantly better than no treatment. Dish soap was not significantly different from two other products (Tecnu, which is much ...


5

The magic skunk-smell-be-gone recipe: In a plastic bucket, mix well the following ingredients: 1 quart of 3% Hydrogen Peroxide 1/4 cup of baking soda 1 to 2 teaspoons liquid soap First thing you want to do is get as much of the skunk goo off of you as you can. Using paper towel, tissues, or a rag you can throw away, dab the spray off your skin. Rinsing ...


4

It is most likely not sap but the excretion from Aphids (Greenfly). They suck the sap from the tree and then excrete this sticky substance, often called Honeydew. It may be worth contacting the tent manufacturers for advice, but I would suggest careful washing first with just water and if that isn't enough, try with some soap flakes (like Dreft).


4

There are cleaning kits designed specifically for cleaning hydration packs like Camelbaks: Camelbak also provides cleaning instructions on their website: The best way to care for your reservoir is to clean and dry it after every use, especially if you fill the reservoir with anything other than water. However, theoretically, if someone didn’t ...


4

Key thing is to get the shoes clean and dry. Wash the shoes at the hottest possible temperature and let them dry thoroughly. (Use a hair dryer on cool/warm setting carefully if needed). Use an anti fungal laundry rinse such as CANESTEN laundry wash if the problem is persistent. Don't wear the same shoes two days in a row - with barefoot shoes look at ...


3

Some options I have used in the past UV Pen - Strong UV Light will kill fungus Anti-Fungal Powder - Works just as well on shoes as it does on toes Anti-Fungal Cream - Same premise


3

As noted, the key is removing it quickly. If you like to carry around dishsoap, that will work great. However if you do not regularly carry that around, abrasives are a good alternative. I've effectively used the sand at the bottom of a small waterfall to remove the oils and of the entire hiking group, all of whom realized too late what we'd walked ...


2

I solved the problem with a combination approach. Given that throwing them away was one option, I didn't see the point in trying anything weak. We all know the phrase "kill the mold on your shoes or destroy them trying". These are tough sandals and have seen quite a bit of abuse during the years. I'm a bit emotionally attached, which means that I don't ...


2

Be careful to check the health warnings on most sterilizing sprays as most of them state not to get on your skin (I don't wear socks in my climbing shoes). There are also a large number of deodorizers, but they can at times produce a far more distracting scent that will fill a room instead of just filling your shoe. As for freezing your shoes, this can ...


2

Kill the bacteria that turns perspiration into a foul smell, sounds crazy but put them in the freezer overnight. This and a through onslaught with any other antibacterial treatments e.g. biological washing powder in luke warm water. As far as I'm aware there is no permanent cure. Do Not put them in the washing machine or use hot water as this may melt the ...


2

I also gave this option a thought. Cleaning it up with strong potable soda water. This has to be done when the precipitation is moist, and not dry. That would flush it off at least better then water.


2

How about using a long pipe cleaner? You can make them by joining and twisting the ends.


1

The trick to preventing chronic athletes foot in toe shoes is the same as with regular shoes, and that is to wear socks. Injinji toe socks are by far the most popular socks to wear with fivefingers shoes. They keep your shoes cleaner, and help prevent funguses from forming inside them. Just keep in mind that if you wear toe socks in your toe shoes, that ...


1

If it's honeydew, then soap & water should do the trick. Do not use harsh soap. An alternative method is to use a gritty, oily mixture to rub it out. I'm thinking maybe baking soda & vegetable oil. The grit helps break up the sticky substance, and the oil keeps it from re-sticking. Similar to using peanut butter to get gum out of your hair. Then ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible