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14

Here are a couple Climb on your Skeleton Overhanging climbing is hard work and tiring. You need to reduce the stress on your muscles by letting your skeleton hold as much of your body weight as possible. Keep your arms straight and your muscles relaxed, don't try and hold yourself against the face. Pull only when you need to pull Use your shoulders/Twist ...


10

You can buy specialist markers. They're designed to not impact the rope strength. Always use a sepecially designed rope marker as there is a comprehensive list of things to keep away from your rope and marker pen is one of them. The solvents can break down the nylon rope fibres making your rope potentially unsafe.


8

Here are some features to keep in mind when buying climbing shoes once you're past the beginner phase: Downturned: Most beginner shoes are pretty flat, which are fine for mainly vertical walls. However, as you climb harder stuff on overhanging walls, it's helpful to have downturned shoes for maintaining a hook-like foot shape. This allows you to hook your ...


7

No matter what, try not to use the spray-paints at all. Considering that fact that most of the spraypaint and allied products contain solvents/chemicals like CCl4, Acetone, Methyl ethyl ketone, Ethylbenzene, Butoxyethanol and Xylene, etc. If I were you, I would not use it on my ropes for that matter. Dedicated Rope Markers : Spend some bucks and get a rope ...


7

I'm guessing from how you phrased your question that you are really interested in how rebolting, specifically bolt removal, is performed. I have never rebolted anything, but the ASCA (American Safe Climbing Association) has pretty thorough articles for people interested in learning how to rebolt climbs here. It goes over the following topics in very good ...


6

The two terms specifically refer to the finer aesthetics of Lead Climbing, in which a climber will either create intermediate anchors using gear (referred to as traditional climbing), or will use the bolted anchors on a wall (referred to as sport climbing), and clip the rope to them as he/she ascends for protection. To understand the two terms, you will ...


6

"Freeing" a route does basically mean to climb a route, which up to then was only aid climbed, in free climbing style for the first time (i.e. using only the natural holds for gripping and stepping on them). Therefore it is a thing that can only happen once per every route. In the great times of the redpoint movement from the mid-70ies on, many single-pitch ...


6

In the UK this is controlled/coordinated by the BMC. They publish an extensive guide on how and when to do this Bolt Guidance Document. There is also a working group, coordinator and they even pay for new bolts. There are lot's of issues around this, the document goes into a lot of detail these. The most important one (in the context of your question) ...


6

The mistakes I mention might be more common at lower grades than yours, here goes anyway: Too big steps. When I started climbing I tended to make massive steps, leaving out many good footholds in between. A more experienced friend taught me to avoid this by clipping a quickdraw between my climbing shoes on a toprope climb well within my ability; suddenly I ...


5

a common footwork mistake is not keeping it still! I see this all the time with people starting in bouldering, their footwork can be indecisive. You need to pick how and where you want to place your foot and do it. Don't keep moving it around, unless you plan to do this. Use the correct parts of your foot/shoe. You want to only use the outside/indside ...


5

Moving up a 1 cm wide campus board one hand at a time is on par with the intensity of V4/V5 boulder moves, approximately. So unless you're very comfortable bouldering in this range, it's not suggested because you will probably injure yourself. If you are past this phase, then campusing is a very good training tool for increasing strength and power in a very ...


4

The best single tip I got when I started bouldering (especially overhangs) is If you are reaching for the next hold with your right hand, keep most of the weight on your right foot. If you are reaching with your left hand, keep most of the weight on your left foot. This is to prevent barn-dooring. In fact, taking the other foot off a hold will often ...


4

Firstly, warm up neatly, and Try to move through the overhang. Visualize the moves and flow through them. If you stop it's hard to get moving again. Use your whole body. It's easy to get good hands and try and pull yourself up. If you observe good climbers on overhanging problems or routes you will likely notice that they continually twist and turn, ...


4

Where does the route setter know from which movements capabilities and skills are assigned to each grade? He doesn't. Skills != grade. Grade is equal to difficulty. Are there some general catalogues / guidelines which movements or skills are necessary to master a certain grade? No, grading is a subjective process. It's more art than science. ...


3

There are rope manufacturers which mark their half ropes in the middle (as an option) or even produce them with different colors on both sides (Beal half ropes). For the reasons already mentioned, this is not standard. When abseiling you use both ropes so the middle is their connection. Still, when climbing alpine routes, I like to have the middle markers ...


3

Your options are limited and I think you've mentioned most of the only possibilities. Depending on where the belay is and presuming it's at ground level you could get your belayer to run backwards as you fall or jump down off a small rock to take in the slack quickly (you've already mentioned these). This will likely slow you decent a little at best and ...


3

I used fishermans thread, the sort used to bind the guide loops to the rod, as a whipping around the approriate point.


1

I use a figure-eight loop. Fairly easy to remove when you need to. Also gives the possibility to descend on one or two ends of the rope if the middle is brought to your anchor.



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