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24

My answer is "don't ask". It's not so much that it's "impolite", but it's an imposition to them and potentially dangerous for you: Belaying can take quite some time, so you're asking the person to give up a chunk of their recreation time to a total stranger. It's not like you're asking someone to help for 30 seconds You're putting your life in their hands, ...


12

From my experience, the simple act of asking won't be perceived as impolite. There is a good chance that people will let you join them, but be prepared to accept "no" as an answer just in case. It would be impolite to press on and try to get them to change their minds, but if you politely accept the "no", you should be fine. (I assume that you actually want ...


8

I wouldn't count ascenders as common climbing gear, so I'm answering for gear that almost every climber has available: An ATC Guide (or Reverso, or similar device with a guide mode) and some cord or webbing. You fix the ATC guide to your harness in guide mode, so that you can easily pull in the rope, but it blocks when you load it (i.e. sit in your harness ...


8

This looks very much like a homemade Grigri replication (or a predecessor). I assume from your description that the moving parts both rotate around the visible upper axis (red circle): One is the cover and the upper the block with the hole on the left. The position of the block in the lower part is assumed to be fix. You insert the rope as in a Grigri, so ...


8

Where I climb (New Mexico, USA), I think it would be impolite to walk up to a stranger outside and ask them out of the blue to belay you. I have been awkward position of being asked to belay someone I don't know / don't want to, and it is certainly uncomfortable. However, it's certainly not impolite to go to a cliff looking to find new climbing partners or ...


7

I think even asking sometimes can be impolite. Some people just have a hard time saying 'no', even if they don't want you there. If there's a good chance they wouldn't want you in the group, don't put them in a difficult situation. Probably Don't Ask: A group of 2 climbers obviously on a climbing date An even-number group of climbers who look experienced ...


5

That brings back memories - the Troll Whillans was the first modern harness on the UK market and I bought one when they came out around 1970. I think I still have it in the shed. Before that, we improvised a harness by wrapping tape around our waist and thighs. As befits the hippy '60s, this was called a Swami Belt. The Whillans was tied on by passing ...


5

I don't have a reference handy but in conversations I've had in the past (several years ago) with people who compete/vie for speed records ascending ropes they exclusively use prusiks. If memory serves they preferred the Texas Prusik system. Here is another resource on the technique. The key benefits of using this system is it is efficient, light weight, ...


4

Now after I got some answers I'd like to post my own observations: The most 'efficient' method I found so far with out using foot ascenders is using two conventional ascenders/(or prussiks/tibloc etc) with each a footloop. (And both obviously also connected to your harness for safety.) That way you can use your leggs to push yourself up. But it still can ...


4

This may not be the most efficient, but is something I have done with the gear I am always carrying - which to me is more important. On any route where I will be abseiling (or may need to ascend) I always carry my Reverso, as well as a Shunt (or smaller / lighter equivalent device). I use the shunt while abseiling in place of a prusik. I generally have a ...


3

One case of taping I personally know to be effective has not yet been addressed. A typical injury in climbing is a lumbrical tear in the most severe case. More likely than a full tear is a strain, which does not even have to involve holding a one finger pocket. A typical symptom is a pronounced pain when load is only applied to some fingers (e.g. only index ...


3

As the others have said, this appears to be a homemade assisted-braking belay device or homemade descender, similar to a GriGri. The moving lobe inside is meant to grab the rope under upward pressure. More importantly, does the item have a UIAA or EN or CE markings, or any markings at all? I'm guessing not since it appears homemade. Regardless of ...


1

For all the reasons in the other answers, one probably should not ask to be belayed by another group of climbers. There's just a lot of awkwardness involved, and a lot of strange risk in trusting someone with your life. However, if you do want to try to get belayed by others, don't be afraid to use a social approach. Go up to groups and chat with them a ...


1

"Jumars" are the quickest method to ascend a fixed rope. They are mechanical devices that lock and each attach to your harness and to leg straps of specified lengths so you can step on one then the other like a ladder and rest on your waist rather than your hands. Climbing with these devices is referred to as "Jugging" and is commonly done by speed ...



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