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12

The only thing this 30+ years old piece of climbing history should be connected to is a fixture to mount it in a frame or display case.


10

A number of prominent climbing organizations (e.g. International Federation of Sport Climbing) either recommend or require two locking carabiners for clip-in attachment to a harness, e.g. IFSC Rules 2015 [1MB DOC] 8.3.5 The climbing rope shall be connected to the competitor's harness by two Screwgate or Self-Locking Karabiners arranged in opposition ...


10

Yes, it has been done! You can try contacting the people at Paradox Sports; this sort of adaptive climbing is exactly what they do. In terms of personal experiences, there are a couple of threads on Mountain Project covering this issue. (By coincidence, at least two or three of the climbers on those threads work/worked for Paradox.) The first thread has ...


9

I have a friend with cerebral palsy who likes to climb, and can only use one arm, he did fairly well belaying with a Petzl GRIGRI: It's a self locking belay device, and can be used easily and rather safely with only one hand. Though not as safe, you can belay one handed with and ATC easily enough, the trick is to never let go of the rope while belaying, ...


8

Carabiners always attach to the belay loop. Attaching carabiners to the tie-in-points causes them to get loaded incorrectly. Carabiners are designed to load the spine, which is the side opposite the gate. Attaching a carabiner to the tie-in-points causes the gate to be loaded, since three strands get loaded (the tie-in loops and the rope end). An ...


4

Two answers: If you are climbing toprope, then you connect the rope via locking carabiner to your belay loop. You do not have to expect high forces. If you are leading you should tie the rope directly to the tie in loops. When falling in a lead you have to expect much higher forces than when toproping. They can relatively easily exceed the crossloading ...


3

As far as I am aware there are no obligatory guidelines on belaying in climbing. Manufacturers, climbing associations and climbing businesses establish their own rules/recommendations, sometimes trying to get them applied universally. Of course these rules are not completely independent, but are based on past experiences (accidents) and commonly accepted ...


2

It's not necessary, but neither is using two non-lockers really. People usually use two carabiners because they will bend the rope less sharply, reducing friction when loaded (also reducing wear on the biners). This is very common in top roping, when the climber is expecting to be lowered. I suspect the person that setup the anchor in the picture wanted ...


1

This question has already been well answered but I would like to address a slightly different point: What's the problem with a wet rope anyway? Dynamic climbing ropes are, to the best of my knowledge, universally manufactured from Nylon 6 or Nylon 6,6. Nylon is a somewhat unusual polymer in that it readily absorbs water, and its properties change ...



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