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13

I believe the conventional way is to use a double (triple) fisherman's bend. This has the advantage of being and relatively compact. The main disadvantage is that it can be hard to undo if you need to. Other options include the figure of 8 bend which is bulkier than the fisherman's but easier to untie. You could also use a (double) sheet bend or even a ...


8

Give them to those who need them. First of all, novice students in your gym or mountaineering school will be happy to use a bit heavier/older gear, but ease the burden of bying everything for their first trip. Just make sure that carabiners are safe, because the newbies can't tell themselves. Then, any local non-commercial groups, who organize rope fun ...


7

Obsolete biners are very useful for retreating. I've you've retired them because: made obsolete by an upgrade. and they are generally solid. Then it's well worth dragging a few of these along on climbs you're worried you may not be able to complete. I've been welcome of some old steel biners when retreating off of climbs in the past. They're solid and ...


7

As Hillsons suggested a good way to use it, let me put in what I would do: You can use it as a Weight. Simply knot a carabiner to the end of a rope that needs slinging over a pole or onto a roof. The weight helps with accuracy. Clip keys inside backpacks to loops for extra security Link a few together for your kid to play with while you are shopping. ...


7

You probably already do this, but make sure you mark all 'retired' carabiners with their own color of tape so that you never accidentally climb with one. Then let the fun begin. If you do any backpacking, they are extremely useful for attaching things to your backpack. A few other favorites: dog leashes, making clotheslines, or use with hammocks. If ...


6

I use the (double) Fisherman's knot for such cases. It's easy to tie and has a clear and concise form (easy to check if done right). As already mentioned in nivag's answer, it can be hard to untie if it was heavily loaded. One of its drawbacks is that it is not applicable for webbing as it is not possible to tighten it there to be stable. Here the waterman ...


5

When I managed a climbing gym we got some resole kits so I thought I would give one a try. The result was not particularly good, but meant a pair of shoes that were totally trashed were at least wearable. The edges didn't bond particularly well, so there is not a very precise toe/edge. It is certainly nowhere near as good as if you get it done ...


5

You can drill some holes in your carabiner and use it as handle for mugs and other things in your home you need to lift. mug example


4

This is probably going to be an unpopular opinion because it's not nearly as "feel good" as helping remote Asian herdsmen. (Which incidentally is probably one of few exceptions to what follows.) Nevertheless: It is my belief that unsafe carabiners should be destroyed. In my opinion it is too great a risk that someone will get ahold of one and see that it ...


4

If you're handy with welding (or a drill and screws, brackets, or a hot glue gun), you can make a pretty cool coat rack or key rack out of old carabiners. You can remove the gate for a coat rack by knocking or drilling or cutting off the pins, or leave them on if you're making a key holder. Just attached the carabiners with the hook down and out from the ...


4

I alternate between the double fisherman's (which everyone has already talked about) and the flat overhand. Lately I've been leaning towards the flat overhand. The benefit of the flat overhand is that it's much easier to tie, inspect, and (most importantly) untie after it's been loaded. When properly tied and dressed, the flat overhand has been shown to be ...


4

Coming from a climbing and industrial rope access background, the double fisherman's is the recommended way to make a loop using rope/cord. Undoing the knot was never part of the question, however under body weight loading even this shouldn't be too difficult. The figure of eight would work equally as well, I'd use it more for joining ropes for long ...


4

Where I am from it costs $60CAN to get your climbing shoes Resoled by a professional. Alternatively, you can try yourself with a KIT that costs $35CAN. However this $35 does not include a knife, sandpaper or acetone to clean the shoe/rubber and does not account for labour, in other words your time taken to repair your shoes. Ultimately to me it seems to ...


3

Foreword I fear it will be a bit complicated to get scientific reference for the answers to your questions as those things might be important but too less to be published. Therefore most of the evidence may be hidden somewhere in the corporate knowledge of the hammer drill manufacturers. Nonetheless I will try to answer you question on my experience in ...


3

I guess to understand the use of a campus board it's the easiest to have a look at it's genesis: The campus board was invented by Wolfgang G├╝llich, who was with Action Directe the first to climb the grade 9a. He invented the campus board while training for this ascent. The crux of Action Directe is a dyno into a shallow hole that has to be held with the ...


3

I would question that particular link. Rating climbs isn't really a tick box exercise, for a start their are multiple different grading systems all of which are slightly different. You cannot say: well it's at x angle and the hand holds are y size therefore it's w There are a number of different challenges to grading climbs: Climbing grades are a ...


3

How about a Figure 8 Bend? Easy to untie even under heavy load. We use them all the time in rock climbing. You might also use a double square knot (reef knot) (Same idea : slightly less secure but way easier to untie, even under heavy load)


2

A nalgene water bottle holder! You can then clip it to the back of your pack, and it helps with carrying it around! You may want to decorate yours though. Also caribiners are nice just to always be attached to your backpack for anything with a loop!


2

There's one exercise where I can't remember the name but let's call it climbing marathon. It is best done in a gym at the end of your climbing session when you are already somewhat pumped. Search for a sector in your gym that is vertical with routes where you know that you can climb them without really thinking about it and where you wouldn't need any funky ...


2

I've carried all my climbing gear as carry on with no problems in NZ, Australia, UK, and Europe - chalk and full trad rack included. In Canada I had it all in checked luggage with no issues. Cannot comment on other areas.


2

They are all very similar. I've attempted to summarise below: Chalk Pure natural calcium carbonate, nothing else. Advantages: It's natural, it doesn't dry your hands out (as much), you're not going to leave chemicals on holds and it'll wash off without leaving a trace, cheap Disadvantage: It can get a bit sticky and gritty on your hands, needs replacing ...



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