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19

I was thinking about this question while rappelling over an overhang this evening with my little girl and payed attention to exactly what I do: Plant your feet on the edge of the overhang, keep your legs straight, and let the rope through your descender until your body has cleared the roof. Think of the wall as flat ground, you want your body as ...


17

The overall risk comparison between being alone or in a group can be split into parts: falling: no increased risk This is obviously independent of being in a group or soloing as climbing on a via ferrata is a solo activity. severity of fall: hardly any increased risk The safety device used on via ferratas is a single user device. So the only factor ...


15

Searching the climbing dictionary for "spit" shows that this is the french term for a "bolt". So the answer is simple: The translation of the guidebook isn't perfect. "Spit anchors" are bolted anchors (or rappels) on these routes. (Which actually matches my observation there.)


11

This is not a direct answer but more of an extended comment about safety when rappelling on overhanging terrain. When rappelling over an overhang or an overhanging wall, make sure that you are certain that you will be able to reach the ground. Ideally you know that both ends of your rope are touching the ground. If your rope doesn't reach the ground you ...


11

Quantifying the total risk of an activity is hard and to an extent opinion based. The increased risk of being solo, is more quantifable and that is what my answer focuses on. The major increase in risk of doing a via ferrata alone (as opposed to in a group or with a partner) is that if you get injured (e.g., from a fall, rock fall, or a bee sting), you will ...


10

I wont cover what is aid climbing here. Original Aid Rating System: A0: Occasional aid moves often done without aiders (etriers) or climbed on fixed gear; sometimes called “French free”. A1: All placements are solid and easy. A2: Good placements, but sometimes tricky. A3: Many difficult, insecure placements, but with little risk. ...


8

Toss the middle first. Throwing your rope isn't always the best solution. High winds, trees, and rocky slopes can make it easy for you to get your rope hung up. Throwing your rope is only really advisable if you're on a steep vertical cliff and there's little or no risk of getting your rope hung up on anything. When you do throw your rope though, it's ...


7

In the United States, a lot of climbers use www.mountainproject.com (MP) to document outdoor climbs and first ascents. If you discover a new boulder problem or bolt a new route, you could submit it here and enter any first ascent (FA) information. See example below: Some climbs had first ascents way before MP came about, so there are discussion boards for ...


7

I'm not aware of any special technique, as it mostly does depend on the actual situation. If you already rappelled quite a length, then the force pulling you to the rock might not be to great anymore, and if you feel confident you can certainly just take a big leap to cross the overhang. Otherwise I'd go slow. When rappelling you usually lean back and push ...


6

First of all, don't coil your rope in the "usual" U-shape, like climbers do! (example picture) Or in ASCII art ___ ------- //// o \\\\ |||| |||| |||| |||| |||| |||| \\// \\// This form is good for carrying, but not for tossing. You mention "lap-coiled", so probably you already know that, but it's worth mentioning (for the likes of ...


6

Very feasible, I know of a couple houses that have a climbing wall on one side, but you'd be better off leaving the siding up, your wall is going to have bolt holes in it which will let in water. You won't need a special support structure, your exterior walls should be framed with 2x6's if it's less than 30 years old, you just need to attach some boards flat ...


5

Previous summer I spent a week in Switzerland and did four via ferrata's on my own. The risk varies greatly depending on the weather and the route. One day there was mist and snow, and I went up a mountain anyway. The climb went well, but when I got to the top you couldn't see the very much and it was hard to find the way back. Luckily someone else did the ...


4

While most people think that the YDS system is easy compared to the British rating system, I am not sure that is the case. In the YDS system, there is a rating, a grade, and a class. The grade indicates the length of time the route typically requires ranging from I (the route takes a few hours) to VII (route takes a week or longer). The rating refers to ...


4

We used to call them 'wall sweepers' This is a wall that isn't climbed much. You can see in the video there are some fresh bolts that have been put in and few old ones. They are just using 'slings and carabiners' on their harnesses. They might have some cams or some nuts. I did not see any on them though. Only the slings and biners getting clipped into ...


4

Thanks to the help from this amazing guy at Reddit, I have got an answer for the question: Usually when you prepare a route for a first ascent you clean it, if it gets a decent amount of traffic then no further cleaning should be needed later on. But on alpine routes, long multi-pitches or big walls you should always be careful of loose rock: too ...


2

You could take steps to evaluate and mitigate your specific risk. e.g. Check whether the entire route is under cellphone network coverage Analyse how popular is the route? Should you have a disabling fall how long will it be before another person comes across you? Check on response times for rescue services to reach the route. Investigate the ...


2

To add to a set of already great answers I would like to add two points: Glued bolts and weird old bolts. There are generally two types of bolts used presently: Mechanical and glued bolts. Mechanical bolts are mostly sleeve anchors: When tightening the nut the first time a cone is driven under the sleeve which is thus forced against the wall of the borehole....


2

In old routes in European (at least) mountains and in quarries used by cavers for training you can find small expansion bolts called spits or Cheville Autoforeuse. They use just 8 mm thick screws and are very short because they are often drilled by hand. You often need your own hangers but sometimes they could be pre-installed. These can fail. Cavers never ...


2

This reminds me of basic training when I was in the military. We started with the basics and went backwards over a 30' rock wall then I think it was a 90-100' rock wall backwards. When you do it the first time, the most unnatural thing was going from standing on the edge and letting the rope through your hands until you were still standing at the edge but ...


1

I have the truly terrible technique of rappelling down to the point of the overhang, stopping, turning sideways so the rope is only half my hips width away from the cliff, then continuing. It makes me look like a rank amateur.


1

Lanyard + 2 ascenders + cordelette. So you have lanyard attached to your harness, and ascenders attached to both arms of the lanyard. You fix ascenders on the rope - one will be above the other. Then you attach cordelette to lower ascender and make a loop on its end. So what do we have - you can put all your weight on a lower ascender, then you stand down (...



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