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12

How dangerous is it to fall 3 meters when lead climbing? This depends a lot on the fall factor. Counterintuitively, the fall factor is higher, indicating a more dangerous fall, when you are near the beginning of a pitch. This is because there's less rope out, so there's less stretchiness. As Steed's comment points out, you're going to fall more than 6 ...


12

Like with most climbing related questions, I personally find it hard to give a definitive rule that applies to all circumstances. There are a couple of safety factors to consider, as well as the perception of the climber. Don't venture out on your own if any of the following doesn't seem intuitive to you. Keep in mind the following: Rope stretch: Rope ...


12

In general climbing ropes are quite robust in terms of storage. The Safety Research Group ("Sicherheitskreis") of the German Alpine Club (DAV) has done a lot of research about this in the 90ies and their general result was: as long as they aren't exposed to sunlight or aggressive chemicals or have been strained over a sharp edge during a fall their ...


11

With dedication you could learn to climb at a top-rope or bouldering climbing gym without professional instruction. The key skill there is belaying, and you could learn that from videos. However I would never recommend this route if good instruction is available. You may have difficulty separating Internet know-it-alls from experts, therefore you may not ...


10

Question: Should I girth hitch my main belay loop Answer: No! You shouldn't girth-hitch a sling to your belay loop. The belay loop should only ever be in contact with a carabiner, as the trained instructor told you. As the instructor told you, girth hitching to the main belay loop will cause it extra wear, and make it wear out faster. You can girth ...


10

What you're talking about is Sport climbing. Generally these anchors are placed by the person who is creating the climb. They will normally top rope or abseil the climb and work out where they want it to go, then spend a couple of days placing the anchors, while on a top rope. They are drilled and glued into place and this can take a lot of time. ...


9

Both, sport climbing and trad climbing are a form of lead climbing, which means the first climber to go up is not protected by a rope from above. A sport climber just uses carries quick draws that, as you mentioned, get clipped to bolts that have been placed in 10 to 15 foot intervals. At the end of the climb, a sport climber can expect to find a belay ...


9

I wanted to mention two additional scenarios not covered by Ben Crowell's great answer. When it is possible to fall past the belayer (on a multi-pitch climb, or when getting to the start of a climb involves a scramble or stepping out onto the face,) the fall factor is the greatest. In those cases the old mantra "the leader must not fall" still very much ...


8

The WP article is pretty good, but SE is meant to be standalone, so I'll try to give my interpretation of the American system, the Yosemite Decimal System. This system is for free climbing (mountaineering, trad climbing, sport climbing, and gym climbing). It doesn't cover aid climbing or bouldering. 1 = Hiking. Example: Kilimanjaro. 2 = May use hands for ...


8

Rather than try to answer the personal part of your question, which as Liam said needs a doctor's attention to answer properly, I shall reply to the more general title: Can a Finger Pulley injury be predicted / anticipated? In an absolute sense I do not believe it can be. In a relative sense it is caused high stress on these "pulleys" so avoiding hard use ...


7

In Europe we have a few systems depending on the country, so in the UK we have two grading systems, adjectival and technical and they work as follows: Easy - E Moderate M - US 5.2 Difficult D - US 5.3 Hard Diff HD Very Difficult VD - US 5.4 Hard Very Difficult HVD Severe S - US 5.5 Hard Severe HS - US 5.6 Very Severe VS - US 5.7 or 5.8 Hard Very Severe HVS ...


7

I love doing routes with 3 people. Once you are efficient at it, those don't take much longer than going with 2 people, you have someone to talk to when the leader is taking forever, and you have an additional hand, if you need it (for taking pictures, dealing with rope tangle, keeping an eye out on the weather, another belayer if the leader gets in ...


7

Climbing Self Rescue: Improvising Solutions for Serious Situations This book presents self-rescue techniques in the first section. The latter half contains several dozen "what would you do" scenarios, allowing you to test what you've learned. It gives one or more solutions to each scenario, as well as highlighting things to watch out for. Most ...


7

In a gym, the toprope will be wrapped over a cylindrical bar. Some gyms have it just over the top of the bar (180 degrees of contact), while others give it an additional full wrap around (540 degrees of contact). In the former setup, a belayer can hold the static weight of a climber who weighs roughly twice as much as she does; the friction between the rope ...


7

Suppose I get to the top of a sport route ... and I want to ... end up with a top-rope setup. "Top-rope setup" implies that someone else is going to climb the same route after you get down, right? Can anyone lay out all the typical steps...? Hang a locking karabiner (or a pair of non-locking quickdraws) on the anchor Clip your rope into it ...


6

I was always using and teaching the method, which Ben Crowell described very well in another answer, and it was standard in our club for a long time. However, over time it showed some important disadvantages. First, it doesn't work reliably on slippery surface. When you "sit down", the force applied to your feet is high, and if one of them slips, you lose ...


6

Alright, there are several different issues here that we must be sure to address. I'll give you my thoughts on each of them. As before I recommend receiving in-person instruction as there may be serious technique problems at the root of this question. Sufficient braking friction A basic requirement is that your belayer is able to easily produce enough ...


6

What you're talking about is called Cleaning Cleaning This video covers the process in detail. But in short: Attach your self to the top anchor with a spare clip draw (or two), or better yet a sling attached to your harness using a larks foot and a locking biner. Inform your belayer that you're safe (but not off belay) Tie a figure of eight on the bight ...


6

Rest! I know you're going to want to climb every second of every day but you must give your ligaments time to heal! Muscle takes two days to repair however ligaments can take 1 -2 weeks. Gradually increase your time climbing, this will greatly reduce the chance of injury. Familiarize yourself with all the necessary safety requirements, do you know what a ...


5

I have to admit that I am no health professional but to me it sounds like you are just trying to climb harder that your muscles allow after your climbing break. The problem with restarting any physical activity after some time of being away from it is, that your brain and the memory of your motor system still know how to do things but your muscles, tendons, ...


5

The best way, when it works It usually works to grab the whole mass of coils, and flip them over when handing them to the second. When you're doing this, care has to be taken that you don't wrap one of the ends around one of the climber's anchor cord. The leader (when bringing up the second) has to make sure that the loops are neatly and tightly stacked, ...


5

I disagree with DavidR's answer to point 1. Girth hitching a sling to your belay loop to clip into the anchors whilst setting up a rappel is common practice and perfectly ok. Leaving a sling permanently girth hitched to the same spot on your belay loop and using it that way for years is a bad idea that has led - in the entire recorded history of climbing - ...


5

Being as your talking about climbing gyms I'm going to limit my answer to indoor climbing only. First things first: Is it a realistic goal to teach yourself how to climb I'd say no. is it really necessary (and safe) to be taught by a professional Necessary: Depends on who you know. If you don't know any other climbers to teach you Yes. If you do ...


5

Libby peters book is good and covers self rescue in detail. It's also the offical book for the UK Mountain Leader and single Pitch award qualifications There is a series on self rescue which I saw recently on UKClimbing.com, could be worth a watch


4

The hardshell/softshell distinction doesn’t mean pretty much anything today. It used to be that hardshell was completely waterproof and windproof, implying limited breathability, and softshell was somewhat waterproof, somewhat windproof and much more breathable. In other words, softshell used to mean a material you could wear most of the time while being ...


4

First off - whether one is more durable or not, they're somewhat different products. Whether you need one or the other is more based on what you're doing than on "durability". Hardshell vs Softshell note - these are marketing terms in the US outdoor industry. Apparently they're not standard internationally. Hard shell jackets offer a high level of ...


4

Some rappels are simply awkward to start. The awkwardness isn't the most important issue in and of itself, but you want to avoid a situation in which the start is so messy that you get banged around, it causes you to lose your grip on your brake hand, and you fall to your death. To prevent this, you can use a Prusik backup below the rappelling device; ...


4

First, if you remove the descender from the harness, you can accidently drop it down (this really happens sometimes). Second, you have one more connection, which you need to control. This can increase the risk, if you are tired and/or do a lot of descents in a row. Third, and the most important, figure 8 twists and tangles the rope like hell. It is not a ...


4

It's a bit of both. Security When toproping, an experienced belayer should have the necessary training to adjust slack/tension depending on the route itself. For example, to avoid any swings that would crash the climber into the rock. There are many examples on safety-related criteria for determining tension (safety for both the climber and the belayer), ...


4

Leg loop verses main belay loop You'll find recommendations for placing an autoblock on either the leg loop or the main belay loop. Some concerns about either placement are: Leg Loops If you're placing an autoblock on your leg loop AND you're using a "quick release" buckle, the carabiner that's holding the autoblock can catch on the buckle and release ...



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