Hot answers tagged

24

My answer is "don't ask". It's not so much that it's "impolite", but it's an imposition to them and potentially dangerous for you: Belaying can take quite some time, so you're asking the person to give up a chunk of their recreation time to a total stranger. It's not like you're asking someone to help for 30 seconds You're putting your life in their hands, ...


16

Was it better than no protection? Probably. Would I recommend it? No. The reason is this: DMM performed some tests where they anchored a sling to a carabiner and a load (80kg), and dropped the load from various heights. The results are a bit more nuanced, but the gist is that you should never fall onto a sling from at or above the anchor without any dynamic ...


15

I couldn't have come up with a better example of "how carabiners should never be used" if I tried! In fact, the most likely explanation for that picture is either such a deliberate bad example, or a joke. A quite likely incomplete list: Use of non-locking carabiners in an anchor - rightmost arrow shows a nut wire just waiting to slip through a wire gate ...


15

Be observant If you go to the gym often take note of who the regulars are and their general abilities. You aren't going to know everyone's name but you might get a rough idea of their capabilities. This will give you introduction lines like: I haven't seen you around here very much. Are you new? I noticed you mostly stick to bouldering. Last week ...


15

Twin ropes can be as small as 6.9mm (35g/m), and are only used in pairs; you tie into two ropes, and clip both as though they were a single rope. This provides you with the redundancy of having more than one rope, but without the weight of carrying two single ropes. Twin ropes also allow a full-rope-length rappel which often strongly factors in the choice ...


14

Whether you run out of rope or just can't complete the route, you have to bail as safely as possible. As soon as your belayer reaches the rope's middle mark, he should double check that there's a stopper knot at the end. Then, you would down climb to the nearest bolt and then proceed to bail on the route using a prusik backup, as described by this old Petzl ...


13

The only thing this 30+ years old piece of climbing history should be connected to is a fixture to mount it in a frame or display case.


12

If it is load bearing, then hell no. This is a mess of cross- and ring-loading, which will break the biners. If it is just a material storage placement, then it is simply confusing. And of what I know about the Eiger, when you find a good placement, you will never ever only use it for hanging up your gear, always for protection. So all in all more ...


12

You wouldn't want to use one to climb. My favourite quote I found on the Internet: Here's my advice on climbing with grappling hooks: don't climb with grappling hooks. Real climbers never use them, and for good reason. You have no idea what they hook onto, so you are trusting your life with something completely unknown. Those things are just for the ...


12

From my experience, the simple act of asking won't be perceived as impolite. There is a good chance that people will let you join them, but be prepared to accept "no" as an answer just in case. It would be impolite to press on and try to get them to change their minds, but if you politely accept the "no", you should be fine. (I assume that you actually want ...


11

If your intending to top-rope with it, or unimaginably lead climb on it, then absolutely not... ever. Polypropylene not only has a super low melting point, but the fibres are a really large diameter, which means they are super susceptible to abrasion, i.e. your rope cutting. It lastly won't stretch when loaded, which is all around bad news in climbing! The ...


11

I'm a very static climber, but back in the day I was one of those climbing cave rats who campused and dyno'd his way through as much of a problem as he could. The key to becoming a more static climber, is to learn more technique and balance. I learned how to be a static climber from bouldering. You can learn a lot from reading a book, or watching some ...


11

In climbing, there isn't a good use. However, in canyoneering a variant of the grappling hook is occasionally used to escape from potholes. It is called an octopus. You make one by attaching several aid climbing hooks like the BD talon to a potshot (a little cloth bag usually filled with sand). See this book for a picture. I have personally used them and I ...


11

Grappling hooks are sometimes used in the arborist (tree climbing) world. Rather than being thrown upwards, they are attached to a line in order to retrieve the other end of the line. Here is a picture of the relevant maneuver: https://www.flickr.com/photos/naturejournal/3391768573/in/album-72157616026109442/lightbox/ The hooks on the end are often curved ...


11

Yes, it has been done! You can try contacting the people at Paradox Sports; this sort of adaptive climbing is exactly what they do. In terms of personal experiences, there are a couple of threads on Mountain Project covering this issue. (By coincidence, at least two or three of the climbers on those threads work/worked for Paradox.) The first thread has ...


10

There are many phrases that you will find concerning dry treatment of ropes, but they can all be easily related to your three categories: non-dry rope This rope has no treatment to repel water. Consequently it absorbs the most water and thus getting heavier. Wet ropes also loose some of their dynamic properties, so falls will get harder. As it is the ...


10

As already stated, these are very similar knots regarding there use. So there is not much that differentiates them from each other, but to other friction hitches. The advantage of the prusik is the "clean" design: All strands are neatly position parallel to themselves, so it is easily inspected for correctness. For the Klemheist this is not the main ...


10

A number of prominent climbing organizations (e.g. International Federation of Sport Climbing) either recommend or require two locking carabiners for clip-in attachment to a harness, e.g. IFSC Rules 2015 [1MB DOC] 8.3.5 The climbing rope shall be connected to the competitor's harness by two Screwgate or Self-Locking Karabiners arranged in opposition ...


9

Essentially para cord is stronger, but its less resilient. Climbing ropes do not need to be strong - you die above about 10G (1000kg) force from internal injuries caused by your harness, a braking strain above this is pointless, even if the rope does not break in a fall that generates very high G forces, you die. Anchors have a force, which if exceeded ...


9

Off width cracks are cracks that are too big to finger jam or fist jam, but too small for you to fit inside and chimney climb, so you have to come up with really awkward and very physically excerting moves to get up them, like climbing upside down (literally). Basically they are cracks that are just the right width to not be fun, and take a lot of physical ...


9

I have a friend with cerebral palsy who likes to climb, and can only use one arm, he did fairly well belaying with a Petzl GRIGRI: It's a self locking belay device, and can be used easily and rather safely with only one hand. Though not as safe, you can belay one handed with and ATC easily enough, the trick is to never let go of the rope while belaying, ...


8

What are the differences? The different ropes basically differ by how they have been treated to handle water: non-dry ropes (although I've never seen that mentioned explicitly) have no special treatment at all, dry ropes have only the sheath, treated with some water-repellant, while dry core ones also have a treatment for the core. In both latter cases, the ...


8

The equalette is the evolution and combination of the cordalette and sliding-x. It makes up for the short comings of each system, while incorporating their strengths to produce a more SRENE anchor. One of the criticisms of the cordalette is after you've tied the master knot, you have potentially poor equalization if you deviate from your set direction of ...


8

Climbing ropes are meant to hold falls, and to absorb the shock of the fall itself through stretching (they can stretch up to 30% of their length during a severe fall so to reduce the impact force on the climber). There's no need for a climbing rope to hold more than it does, because any more force during a fall and the body of the falling climber would be ...


8

They are user replaceable, in fact some manufacturers recommend replacing slings every 2-5 years if they're very frequently used, but they're only user replaceable if you know how to sew structural climbing gear and have the equipment to bartack a loop of SuperTape or 10mm Dynex. The simplest thing to do is simply replace the worn sling with 1" tube ...


8

This is more likely than not, related to two things: Your balance Your core strength Those two things are related. I can't find the reference but Sonnie Trotter once said: Climbing is three things: Strong fingers, strong mind, strong core. I would recommend improving your core strength as this will certainly improve your balance. This will also ...


8

Short answer: Climb lots of other routes in many different areas and have lots of other people climb your routes. Let me get into why you opened a can of worms with your question: Ratings for routes are almost always in a greater context both historically and in respect to their location. The people who created the Yosemite Decimal System for example had ...


8

Take off the wire cable and you're pretty much left with an old school belay plate: The original belay device was simply a munter hitch on a "Karabiner", or "Halbmastwurfsicherung" (often abbreviated HMS) as it was originally called, but munter hitches are hard on ropes, which was the reason belay plates ("Sticht plates" after their inventor Fritz Sticht) ...


8

So what does the keeper wire do. Makes it easier to attach the device to your harness when not using. Prevents the belay device working it's way up the rope when giving slack. Keeps the delay device in the optimal position for use one could simply cut it off and carry the device using the large hanging eye or rope eye. Why?! What does this gain ...


8

Carabiners always attach to the belay loop. Attaching carabiners to the tie-in-points causes them to get loaded incorrectly. Carabiners are designed to load the spine, which is the side opposite the gate. Attaching a carabiner to the tie-in-points causes the gate to be loaded, since three strands get loaded (the tie-in loops and the rope end). An ...



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