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4

It depends on the nature of the deficiency. The most common form, red-green colorblindness, isn't a problem: I'm not aware of any situation where color coding is used to convey safety-critical information. On the other hand, if you've got rod monochromacy, climbing mountains is probably a bad idea.


3

I don't know whether e.g. mountain guides for expeditions are accepted if they have color vision deficiency. But as a participant I don't think this is a no-go criteria. There were guys with asthma and other serious medical limitations going on 8000+ and Mark Inglis made it on the Everest with two artificial legs. I don't know what you suppose of a ...


5

Rest! I know you're going to want to climb every second of every day but you must give your ligaments time to heal! Muscle takes two days to repair however ligaments can take 1 -2 weeks. Gradually increase your time climbing, this will greatly reduce the chance of injury. Familiarize yourself with all the necessary safety requirements, do you know what a ...


0

Due to the different requirements of several types of climbing there are lots of different scales. There are systems all over the world: some are typical for North America, some for the Alps and some for Scotland/UK. Most are measured on the toughest spot (would be interested which ratings aren't scaled like this). @Ben Crowell gave a nice detailed answer ...


2

Disclaimer: My Answer is based off Canada's Tour de Bloc structure. My understanding for the use of the term Open is that it is "Open" to anyone who wants to give it a go. If you are not vying for a spot on the Canadian team you would go Recreational or Experienced. The Open category is for the top climbers who are serious about competing. Open ...


7

Suppose I get to the top of a sport route ... and I want to ... end up with a top-rope setup. "Top-rope setup" implies that someone else is going to climb the same route after you get down, right? Can anyone lay out all the typical steps...? Hang a locking karabiner (or a pair of non-locking quickdraws) on the anchor Clip your rope into it ...


6

What you're talking about is called Cleaning Cleaning This video covers the process in detail. But in short: Attach your self to the top anchor with a spare clip draw (or two), or better yet a sling attached to your harness using a larks foot and a locking biner. Inform your belayer that you're safe (but not off belay) Tie a figure of eight on the bight ...



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