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1

You can see a list of the mebership discounts currently at: https://www.thebmc.co.uk/membership-discounts It covers a wide variety of things. TBH, if your looking to join the BMC for a discount it's likely not worth it. Often I get better discounts from memberships to walls, etc. (hold on a second while I get on this high horse) The BMC is really ...


3

For certain purposes, the offset overhand bend is not just safe but safer than any known alternative. The alternative name "European death knot" is a joke referring to the fact that to the uninitiated, the knot looks like it wouldn't be secure. It's like the phrase "politically incorrect," which nobody today uses without irony. There is a common ...


6

The European Death Knot is commonly used for joining two ropes for an abseil. I would not say it is "not considered safe" - e.g. the British Mountaineering Council's website lists it as a possible abseil knot. Although not the strongest knot it has the advantage that it is small and less likely to snag on edges than larger knots or stronger symmetrical ...


5

According to this source its name arose initially in the US where unfamiliarity bred distrust, and because the occasional disaster, likely with the Flat Figure 8 version, caused both knots to be branded with the EDK (European Death Knot) name. Another source says its name is because this knot looked sketchy for americans when they european climbers using ...


0

I've had a lot of discussions about this and what I gather is hooking a carabiner into both hard tie-in points when belaying from the ground is OK and it's moot point. Here's what happens when you catch your lead climber (from the ground). The rope goes tight and your carabiner has an upward pull. This upward pull will pull the bottom loop up and the impact ...


7

It may help to take a bit of cord and work through the instructions in order. After trying it out here, I would describe the finished product as follows: You have a massively-rethreaded figure-8; instead of two side-by-side strands forming the 8, it will have four. This massive knot will have two loops coming out of one end. The other end will have one ...


5

Below is the list that I found by googling on "chuck wilts" 1956 tahquitz yds. After the name of each route is the consensus rating on mountainproject.com. Each climb is hyperlinked to a description on mountainproject. 5.0 - The trough, FA 1936 (.4) 5.1 - Fingertip traverse, FA 1936 (.4) 5.2 - Frightful variation of the trough, FA 1944 (.2) 5.3 - East ...


8

Off width cracks are cracks that are too big to finger jam or fist jam, but too small for you to fit inside and chimney climb, so you have to come up with really awkward and very physically excerting moves to get up them, like climbing upside down (literally). Basically they are cracks that are just the right width to not be fun, and take a lot of physical ...


4

They are user replaceable, in fact some manufacturers recommend replacing slings every 2-5 years if they're very frequently used, but they're only user replaceable if you know how to sew structural climbing gear and have the equipment to bartack a loop of SuperTape or 10mm Dynex. The simplest thing to do is simply replace the worn sling with 1" tube ...


4

A generic list: Not testing the holds, anchors and knots. Miscommunication, leading to improper positioning may be. While climbing stepping on the uphill side of the rope leading to upside down falls. Climbing without Helmets. More Confidence than Competence/Capability Not judging the slack rope and the length of the rope needed, reaching the end of the ...


7

Combing through the 2015 issue of Accidents in North American Mountaineering, here were the four mistakes that I saw over and over: no helmet not placing any pro, or climbing unroped starting too late in the day rappelling off the end of the rope, no knots in the ends This is just my subjective, unscientific impression, and I've biased the list toward ...


4

I love these situations "It tried it once, and it worked, must be safe"...... I am so glad aviation and car industry don't work that way. The answer has to be No, its not safe with ropes of different dimensions. Its also not safe with ropes of the same dimension. Which is less safe - I don't know and I don't care and neither should you. There is one place ...


1

Look at the average heights of the worlds top climbers and very few of them are over 6ft tall. Being tall is an advantage when you start climbing but the harder it gets and the smaller the hand/foot holds get the more advantage there is to being small and light. I'm 6'2" and weight 85kg so moves with high feet push my weight further away from the wall than ...



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