Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I second the recommendation of taking a course, don't just learn it from a single picture. Travelling on glacier doesn't only requires to know how to tie (and, there's not one-way-fits-all-situations way to tie in, you got to know how to tie according to the situation, that is, number of members of the party, their expertise, their weight, the kind of ...


0

You can anchor your belayer, this is especially important to do when multi-pitching, but if you're belayer is always going to be on the ground then she should learn how to catch a fall without being anchored to the floor. It's easier on your gear and it softens your fall if the belayer comes off the ground, especially on big falls. I had one climbing friend ...


0

I would also not hang your rope on one single cord, because this causes damages on this part. This is a problem specially if you have it over a sharp edge or a small hanger, where diameter gets really small. It's better to have in like you described stored in a dark dry rope bag in a shelf.


4

Part of the reason you get pumped out while climbing is because your arms are up over our head. Compression sleeves work for runners because the gradient compression helps the blood in their legs flow back up to their hearts against gravity (they give extra elasticity to the veins which are superficial[nearer to the surface of the skin] to your muscles). ...


-2

I do use those compression sleeves when I am going for cycling. I have observed that with the sleeves that I have, there is a gradual difference in the elasticity of the material towards the middle of the arm sleeve, such that the compression is tighter at the lower endpoints, like wrists in case of arm sleeves and ankles in case of leg sleeves. The idea ...


5

As the comments have mentioned, grades vary somewhat between gyms, but I think you can still provide some rough guidelines. Peg boards can probably be done by anyone at any climbing level. You're not stressing your fingers really, so there's little chance of injury. It's essentially like practicing pull-ups. It probably won't help your climbing too much ...


9

The answer of @BenediktBauer covers pretty much everything you have to know as a beginner on glaciers. What you also have to know is the proper knot (and that was the second part of your question). You can use the figure eight, like is recommended in sport climbing too (so most people will already know this knot). You of course have to watch out, because of ...


13

First of all: Walking a glacier contains some serious risks and roping up is not enough to cover that risks, but also knowledge of crevasse rescue is needed. Therefore I strongly recommend a glacier course where all those things are taught. Now for some basic things to consider when walking a glacier as a roped party: When walking a glacier, one normally ...



Top 50 recent answers are included