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3

When I was in central Alaska, courtesy of Uncle Sam, we wore vapor barrier boots. They are great for extremely low temperatures, but of you are heavily exerting in milder weather* (down to -23C/-10F range), your socks would get downright soggy. Some soldiers did put anti-perspirant on their feet to help with cold and trench foot symptoms. If plastic ...


0

This is basicaly a cut and paste of my answer here: Rating climbs isn't really a tick box exercise, for a start their are multiple different grading systems all of which are slightly different. You cannot say: well it's at x angle and the hand holds are y size therefore it's w There are a number of different challenges to grading climbs: Climbing ...


5

Could the use of anti-perspirant give benefit in extreme cold climate where sweating can be a significant problem. TL;DR answer: Unlikely. The issue is the sheer amount of water your body will secrete during physical exercise. It would be impossible for anti persperant to prevent this amount of moisture. To clarify Anti-perspirants work by: ...


17

The Dawn wall is one of the largest and most difficult climbs in the world, it's nearly 1000m of blankness, there isn't a lot to hold onto all the way up. But you're right, it has been "climbed" before. The Dawn wall was first climbed in 1970 by Warren Harding and Dean Caldwell. These climbers used a different technique to what Kevin Jorgeson and Tommy ...


2

Yes, stop climbing. You're connective tissues are not ready for it. Active rest (easy climbing/easy training) and rehab/prehab for your fingers, wrists, forearms, and upper body in general will help. Look at it this way, however long you have had the injury/been feeling pain, you will need to rest and rehab your joints/connective tissue for the same amount ...


2

This is a very, very common problem, perhaps the most common limiting factor among all climbers. It may be worse for you than for most climbers, but at least you realize it and wish to adress it, so you have a better chance of overcoming it than someone who pretends there is no problem! First of all, to really get used to falling, you need to take far more ...


2

I'd focus less on the falling part and more on the climbing part. Get some miles under your belt by leading climbs that you feel comfortable on. Leading is a separate skill from the purely physical act of climbing, you need to train your mental control as well as your physical. It's unreasonable to expect that you'll be leading at the same technical level ...


0

The technique I learned through AMGA is to extend your rappel using a full length nylon sling. Girth hitch one end through your hard points, tie an overhand knot halfway through the sling then clip the remaining end back to your belay loop with a carabiner. You can then clip your ATC carabiner through both loops (over the midway overhand knot) and set up ...


3

I would argue you've left off the most subjective of metrics, but the most useful: similarity to other routes in the same area. I don't think there's going to be a single equation to grade a route. You'll have general rules of thumbs that hold true (more holds = easier, more overhang = harder), but those will never give you a grade from first principles. ...


1

Being a climber (mostly indoor these days) with a lifetime of eczema on my hands, and some nasty flapper experiences (and a pulley injury), I've done lots of research into this! So lots of mentions of product, but I'm not getting handouts ;) RE. Moisturisers. I think this is a very personal decision about the type, frequency and timing. I'm a big fan of ...


2

I'm getting back into leading indoors and going through similar things with the 'head-game' part of climbing. Agree with Brian and the others. Practising indoor falls, and talking to myself are helpful strategies for me. Although I'm doing more of the talking myself over stuff ("You'll be OK, you can do this!" or through moves "right hand, twist-lock then ...



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