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1

I use a figure-eight loop. Fairly easy to remove when you need to. Also gives the possibility to descend on one or two ends of the rope if the middle is brought to your anchor.


5

Moving up a 1 cm wide campus board one hand at a time is on par with the intensity of V4/V5 boulder moves, approximately. So unless you're very comfortable bouldering in this range, it's not suggested because you will probably injure yourself. If you are past this phase, then campusing is a very good training tool for increasing strength and power in a very ...


3

I used fishermans thread, the sort used to bind the guide loops to the rod, as a whipping around the approriate point.


7

No matter what, try not to use the spray-paints at all. Considering that fact that most of the spraypaint and allied products contain solvents/chemicals like CCl4, Acetone, Methyl ethyl ketone, Ethylbenzene, Butoxyethanol and Xylene, etc. If I were you, I would not use it on my ropes for that matter. Dedicated Rope Markers : Spend some bucks and get a rope ...


10

You can buy specialist markers. They're designed to not impact the rope strength. Always use a sepecially designed rope marker as there is a comprehensive list of things to keep away from your rope and marker pen is one of them. The solvents can break down the nylon rope fibres making your rope potentially unsafe.


5

a common footwork mistake is not keeping it still! I see this all the time with people starting in bouldering, their footwork can be indecisive. You need to pick how and where you want to place your foot and do it. Don't keep moving it around, unless you plan to do this. Use the correct parts of your foot/shoe. You want to only use the outside/indside ...


6

The mistakes I mention might be more common at lower grades than yours, here goes anyway: Too big steps. When I started climbing I tended to make massive steps, leaving out many good footholds in between. A more experienced friend taught me to avoid this by clipping a quickdraw between my climbing shoes on a toprope climb well within my ability; suddenly I ...


7

Here are some features to keep in mind when buying climbing shoes once you're past the beginner phase: Downturned: Most beginner shoes are pretty flat, which are fine for mainly vertical walls. However, as you climb harder stuff on overhanging walls, it's helpful to have downturned shoes for maintaining a hook-like foot shape. This allows you to hook your ...


3

There are rope manufacturers which mark their half ropes in the middle (as an option) or even produce them with different colors on both sides (Beal half ropes). For the reasons already mentioned, this is not standard. When abseiling you use both ropes so the middle is their connection. Still, when climbing alpine routes, I like to have the middle markers ...


4

Where does the route setter know from which movements capabilities and skills are assigned to each grade? He doesn't. Skills != grade. Grade is equal to difficulty. Are there some general catalogues / guidelines which movements or skills are necessary to master a certain grade? No, grading is a subjective process. It's more art than science. ...


3

Your options are limited and I think you've mentioned most of the only possibilities. Depending on where the belay is and presuming it's at ground level you could get your belayer to run backwards as you fall or jump down off a small rock to take in the slack quickly (you've already mentioned these). This will likely slow you decent a little at best and ...


6

Muir Valley is a privately owned area, so presumably the coins are acceptable to the retired couple that owns it. Don't know about Ontario, but in the US (the Red River Gorge aside) most climbing areas are owned by federal or state governments who may likely have regulations against physically marking the starts of the routes (this is in addition to any ...


9

How about if you just take photos and post them on mountainproject or summitpost, along with verbal descriptions and UTM coordinates? Physically marking the starts of the routes is not compatible with a leave-no-trace ethic.


1

I'm presuming your on an overhanging wall here as if you can touch the wall you should walk down preventing this issue. It's very common to twist and spin a little when being lowered off overhanging terrain so don't worry about it! Keep calm and relax. If you tense up and try and correct any spining or swinging your likely only going to make things ...


3

For lowering on top-rope: Grab a quickdraw and attach one end to your belay loop and the other end to the belayer end of the rope. For lowering on lead: Same idea, but you will have to unclip the quickdraws on the wall as you go down essentially cleaning the route before getting stuck on the quickdraw attached to your belay loop


1

I'd like to make an addition to the answer of @RoryAlsop. Namely the case where only ONE end of the rope is used. Next to descending on both rope-ends at the same time, it's also possible to do it only on one end. This is for example done if you have very technical rappels where you need to use extra gear or lock yourself into the rope (in that case ...


5

Iztaccihuatl would use about the same skills as Aconcagua, but is lower altitude and can be done in a day, rather than the 2 weeks usually required for Aconcagua. I acclimatized by spending several days hiking on La Malinche. If you're interested in Aconcagua and don't have a lot of high-altitude/snow experience, you might want to do Izta as a warmup. Point ...


8

It's what @imsodin said. Bloqueur is the french term for "blocker" in English. So when I talk about a bloqueur, I'm talking about blocking devices. The two that I use for ascending a rope are the Petzl basic and Petzl croll. The use of French terms is a habit that I picked up from canyoning, which is by origin a French sport, so most of the terms used there ...


6

I can only assume, that it derives from bloquer which is french for blocking. What the "c" is doing in there I have no clue - but then, I am not a native french speaker. In this case there are several devices that are generally used for this: There is Petzls Tibloc, a very light device. But it is also very aggressive and may damage the rope so it has to ...



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