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There is no secret to beat Fear. Fear is part of our inner core. Observe it widely, try small, under controlled conditions, learn when it leads the body, act big with this knowledge. Just dive! Beat Kammerlander said once: When I rest, fear can come. When I climb, concentration has to be there.


2

Generally a fall of 50-60 ft will kill most anyone. However, I had a friend fall of the back of a motorcycle that was not moving and he died because he hit his head on a rock, so go figure. A number of people have survived fall of 100-200 ft without substantial injury. There are three people who have survived falls of 10,000 feet. One, an airline passenger ...


2

The extract from a report linked below might be of assistance, and the report is well worth the read and should be quite accessible to those without a medical background. The American College of Surgeons' Committee on Trauma (ACS-COT) defines a critical threshold for a fall height in adults as > 20 feet (6 meters), as part of the field triage decision ...


3

I'd say the answer to this question is yes. Being ambidextrous while climbing will make you a better climber, because there are certainly routes that have forced, right-handed or left-handed cruxes that simply can't be done the other way around. I've seen people really struggle on problems that force them to rely on their weaker hand, instead of ...


23

It's not the fall that gets you, it's the sudden stop at the end. The most detailed data on the effects of large accelerations (or equivalently, decelerations) on the human body comes from research into spaceflight and aircraft ejection systems. There is a very detailed paper from NASA here, from which figure 5 (p. 36) is most useful. The summary is: it ...


3

I knew a guy who was a medical examiner for the State Coroner. He dealt with a lot of people who had jumped from things. His rule was "Jump from seven, straight to heaven" ie 7th floor or more if you wanted to go right now rather than after a very painful interval.


1

As other answers have mentioned, there are too many factors to determine a fatal fall height. However, the rule of thumb for determining if there's a likely mechanism of injury for a spinal injury is whether there's a fall from more than 3x the person's height.


11

16ft (5m) When rock climbing, you're pretty much guranteed to be landing on rock if you fall. When I trained in CSPS and EMP III, the magic number was 16ft (~5m). If someone fell from upright with their feet above that height or higher onto a solid surface, then they were an instant bag and drag, aka: strapped to a spine-board and rushed to the hospital. ...


6

This doctor's blog claims that: The median height leading to death is about 49 feet (15 meters), or about 4 to 5 storeys. 100% of victims die after falling 85 feet (25 meters), or about 8 storeys. Obviously, the 100% figure is incorrect as there have been individual people who survived higher falls. In any case, the height alone is not decisive. It ...


29

There is no specific distance from which a person can fall and have it said they will survive or not survive. There are simply too many other variables that will dominate the factor of "distance." In 1971, flight attendant Vesna Vulović fell 33,333 ft (10,160 meters) and survived without a parachute. On the other hand 556,000 people died in 2013 from ...


3

There is no such thing as this certain height. You can fall from a chair, hit your head badly and be right dead. On the other hand, a couple of people fell thousands of meters (without parachutes...) and survived. Some things affecting the outcome of the fall are: Your posture (head/feet first), the surface (water, rock, snow, trees or bushes...) and ...


6

I both agree and disagree with Michaels answer. If you can train your weaker hand to be as good as your stronger hand then good on you but this isn't always possible. My left is much weaker than my right. I train my left all the time but it's always not as strong as my right. As such, I will sometime vary my approach to "crux" moves so that I can get my ...


2

Aside from the excellent answer by Michael Borgwandt, I have to add that a climbing shoe isn't just there for better gripping. Just like any other shoe, it also protects your feet from any sharp objects or rough surfaces that you may encounter along your trip. The more widely used paths have probably been worn down, but if you're on a new path, it is likely ...


5

I climb in vibram five-fingers (KSO's), climbed in them for the first time in 2008 and loved them, where they excel is in roofs and overhanging problems because you can hook holds a lot easier with your toes, but for tougher wall climbing with small features (5.11+) I still use climbing shoes. There are some gyms that allow climbing barefoot, but for the ...


2

One thing is that I doubt it's possible to train the toes to have significant strength; unlike the fingers, they are simply not built for that job. And most of the time, you have a lot more weight on your feet than on your hands. Injury and strain would be a big problem. Then there's the sweating: there's actually more sweat glands in your soles than ...



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