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22

Your legs aren't as sensitive to temperture extremes. Right now it's winter here and I'm walking around outside with a regular shirt, a wool sweater, and a wind breaker on my torso. Inside I take off the windbreaker an sweater. However, inside or outside, I'm wearing the same single-layer pants and it's not a problem. My legs don't feel hot inside or ...


14

There's a reason desert cultures almost all wear coverings from head to toe. Three main things to consider: Protection from the sun's harmful rays. Air flow for convection cooling Moisture retention (you heard that right) for evaporative cooling. Despite the convention, "cotton kills," in the desert those same properties (slow drying, water retention) ...


13

To be honest I was dubious about getting something that I thought was gimmicky, but my son’s Scout troop was selling custom Buffs to raise group funds so I ended up buying one. A Buff is just a tube of lightweight, stretchy material. I’ve found them useful in three particular situations: They are thin, so can be worn like a hat under a bicycle helmet for ...


12

The short answer is, it varies. The three factors that most influence the UV transmission factor of clothing are kind of obvious: Material: Some materials are better at absorbing UV than others; for example, the paper cited below suggests that polyester absorbs more UV light (particularly UVB) than cotton. Weave: The thicker and more tightly woven a piece ...


12

I'm not sure why pants don't receive the same attention but the layers are available. You can easily find base, insulating, and shell layers. Olin's answer gives some good reasons layering pants may not seem as common. In reply: (2) There are full-side-zip pants for mountaineers (crampons) and wide-opening pants for skiers/boarders and regular boots. ...


11

Don't use cotton socks for hiking. When your feet sweat, the socks become wet, and take forever to dry out. Good socks remove the bacteria and moisture that thrive in the environment created by sweating feet and help to prevent blisters. Cotton retains moisture, thus cotton socks will not do the job properly. Rather, buy non-itching ("merino") wool, ...


10

I strongly recommend you purchase, borrow, or possibly rent a proper ski jacket and pants. Given that you don't have a ski jacket I'm guessing that you are a relative beginner. It is likely that you might be falling down quite a bit. One thing to consider is does your jacket give you good mobility? If it does not, you could very easily expose your waist ...


10

Correct size. That might sound obvious, but consider also width and height (of the instep). Each make is a bit different, so there's a need to try on many before you find one that fits really good. For all-day trips get boots one size larger than your usual office shoes are. Vibram sole If properly maintained, leather upper is much more waterproof and ...


10

Although black clothing absorbs radiation from the sun more than white clothing, this is somewhat offset by the fact that it also emits it more efficiently. Good absorbers are also good emitters. If you're standing in dark shade and the objects in your environment are cooler than the temperature of your clothing, then black clothing will theoretically cause ...


9

My experience in this field is quite limited, but this is what I'd look for: Light - Hiking boots should be as light as possible. Believe me when I say that walking around when carrying a ton sucks. A proper sole - and by proper I mean one that isn't too hard or too soft. Too hard will provide little to no traction on slippery surfaces, and one that is too ...


9

Sleeping with the socks on your torso is the most effective method I have found, and it does not require anything you wouldn't already have. For this, you just: Take socks off Put them inside your shirt, under all layers of clothing. They must be touching your skin. Sleep Wake up in the morning with dry socks. This works with a lot of things: socks, ...


8

The liner acts as a climate control mechanism for your body through a reduction of moisture and an increase in circulation. The synthetic fiber content acts as a wick to pull the moisture away from your skin, while the mesh composition acts as a suspension system that increases airflow by maintaining separation between your skin/undershirt and the remainder ...


7

a two layer winter hat to protect your ears a good winter jacket (long enough) supporting -40ºC (-40ºF) winter boots a two layer gloves a scarf For the intermediate layer: The key point is to not sweat. Depending on your body, you should choose the appropriate "heat level" intermediate layer. Some shops will have different categories from very cool to ...


7

The wikipedia article on sun protective clothing is very informative. A summary of the relevant parts: Apart from clothing specifically marketed as protecting against the sun most clothing will not block all sun to fully protect you against sunburn depending on circumstances. Some general rules of thumb: Darker clothes provide more protection than ...


7

According to one study of one species of mosquito, "attractiveness was found to vary inversely with their reflectivity or brightness, although the different textures represented in the series tended to obscure the generalised relationship" (Brown 1954). Meaning the brighter the clothing, the less attractive for one species of mosquito found in Canada... I ...


7

Despite the convention, "cotton kills," in the desert those same properties (slow drying, water retention) are useful for keeping you cool by slowing down the near instant evaporation experienced at such high heat and low humidity. Your goal is to make that moisture work as long for you as possible. Since "water is 24.5 times more conductive than air," ...


7

Nylon, among other synthetics, is an ideal material for clothing for most outdoor pursuits for several reasons. I will use the example of cotton as the traditional fabric for comparison: Durability: Nylon itself can come in several varieties, some of which are more durable than others due to different weights and weaves. The fabric can handle abrasion, ...


6

There are many excellent natural fabrics for winter hiking: Merino wool is often used as a baselayer but I have also found silk and bamboo to be very good. I have a knitted raw silk midlayer but also like cashmere, which is warm, light, doesn't smell and releases moisture pretty well. In colder conditions I wear sweaters made of untreated wool (Black ...


6

I trust Arc'teryx: http://www.arcteryx.com/product-care.aspx?EN There's a video to take you through the whole process. And you actually DO want to use the dryer because the heat reactivates the durable water repellant (DWR). DWR is the actual substance/layer that does the water repelling. You can also follow the instructions recommended on the actual ...


6

It's not clear what you think the layer principle, is but you don't have to dress in layers. It's the performance of the complete stackup that matters. In cold weather, this could be achieved, for example, by a polypro sweater then wool sweater then wind breaker, or with a single "winter" jacket. Both can be made to keep you warm equally well, and the ...


6

I believe that you should prepare with some additional first layers, bringing more socks is not a bad idea since you will be walking quite a bit (I assume). Otherwise I would focus some on bringing a little extra protection, in form of a scarf, fleece cap and a pair of gloves. Winter is a unforgiving time of year and you need to plan your clothing with ...


6

When would actually one want to wear exactly cotton socks? Hygienic reasons where washing your socks hot (95 °C) and frequently is important. I guess the most common such reason (besides being doctor/nurse/...) is having a fungal infection. In that case in addition to the proper medication you should change your socks frequently (if they get moist even ...


5

Are you sure you need boots? I absolutely love my trail running shoes (La Sportiva Wildcats). They are much lighter than boots, and while they aren't water proof, they dry out very quickly due to being mostly mesh uppers. On hot days, you can literally feel the breeze through the uppers. It is very nice for me as my feet tend to sweat a lot in boots.


5

As long as you are washing with a front-loader, then putting in your water-proofs and washing on a low temperature with reproofer (instructions should be on the bottle) will get your get clean and waterproof. Top-loaders batter the hell out of your clothes, and can damage the waterproofing. Also - do not but them in a dryer... hang them out (you probably ...


5

As a rough guide to waterproofness - 5000mm is generally rainproof but won't necessarily stand up well to torrential rain. Around 15000 should be fine in that context. If you go higher than that then you're looking at fabric that can be immersed in water and still stay waterproof for a while, but should be ample for any rain shower that might come along! ...


5

The key to cold weather clothing is viewing it as a system. The base layer of the system wicks moisture from the body and provides a small amount of insulation. The middle layer(s) of the system provide warmth and wind protection. The outer layer provides protection from the elements. That being said, a proven system for the temperature range you're ...


5

Expedition weight relates to the temperature rating and level of activity. It usually means cold and low activity. According to REI expert-advice section. For cool conditions, thermal underwear is available in light-, mid- and expedition-weights. Choose the weight that best matches your activity and the temperature. [...] Like thermal underwear, ...


5

My hard shell and puffy down shell both have hoods, but they are the only layers of mine that do. I rarely wear the down shell while in motion, unless it's extremely cold (below -15C), which basically just leaves the waterproof hard shell. To adjust for warmth in the gap between 0 and -15C I just use a toque and a scarf, and vary the type, thickness, and ...


4

You probably want wool. Wool has a fairly good warmth to weight ratio, and keeps most of its warmth when its wet. You can get wool products for both base layers and insulating middle layers. "Merino wool" is the style of wool that seems to be popular for high end outdoor wear now. They can be expensive, but the following companies make very high quality ...


4

There are a variety of important features that your leather jacket will lack compared to a ski jacket. Borrowing or buying a ski jacket from a thrift shop would definitely be worth it. Skiing is pretty physically intense. If it's not very cold (above 20?), you'll sweat, and most ski jackets don't actually have much insulation as they're designed to block as ...



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