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10

So at 5C, with 60Kmh winds, that gives you a feeling of about -2C See here. Not zero, If the air temperature gets to 0C then there's a potential for about -9C. You want to be aiming for a laying system so you can adjust your core temperature with movement, if you stop you'll want something to keep you warm. I'm not sure you have anything like that in that ...


5

Always bring plenty of layers, so you can add/remove as necessary. When I cross country ski, I often end up very warm. Even if it's only 20°F out I may be skiing in a synthetic T-shirt. The important thing is to have the warm clothes available to put on when you stop or if the weather worsens. Should you bring a fleece jacket? 100% yes! Do you have ...


5

Yes and don't even think about leaving your fleece at home... Even if you are moving fast and therefore producing a lot of warmth by the exercise there is always the possibility to get into bad weather. And if not, what are you doing when you stop for a break? You are wearing wet clothing and it is cold. Maybe even windy. You might get hypothermia really ...


4

Here's based on my experience of bicycling in Toronto in winter (a daily 18km / one-hour each-way commute) ... Don't let your hands and feet (fingers and toes) get cold. They don't have a lot of fat and blood circulation and muscle (I guess they're mostly bone and tendon) so they need insulation. It's been decades since I last cross-country-skied but when I ...


3

I just browsed the meta site, and am encouraged to add an answer. I agree with the above answers and comments, especially (1) don't wear cotton pants; (2) carry spare socks and mitts; (3) poly is lighter and warmer than wool when wet; (4) your clothing is on the light side; consider the additions suggested. I'd ADD: a neck gaiter. This is a fleece tube ...


3

I would add an extra insulation layer for the morning. A light down or synthetic jacket would help you warm up when you get out of bed. Don't wear cotton pants. Not only will they keep you cold if they get wet, they will never dry, and will be very uncomfortable. When it does not rain, you'd want your fleece to be wind-stopper, or have a windproof jacket ...


2

Actually, what you are missing here is that we also have heat radiating from our body. When we wear dark color, it absorbs that heat, and allows it to escape. When we wear a light color, it reflects body heat right back to us. There's a number of articles and studies that discuss this.


1

It's a simple calculus: weigh the inconvenience of carrying some extra layers (weight and bulk) vs. the danger of being under prepared. Keep in mind that weather forecasts are only advisory, and conditions can change (sometimes for the worse). When I hike in the mountains (White Mountains, New Hampshire) or backcountry ski, I always err on the side of ...



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