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28

Here is an article that quantifies the heat loss effects of cotton, polyester and polypropylene: Rossi et al., Dry and Wet Heat Transfer Through Clothing Dependent on the Clothing Properties Under Cold Conditions, International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics (JOSE) 2008, Vol. 14, No. 1, 69–76. Experimental Summary Here is a rough summary ...


19

Yes, there have been studies on how much various fabrics insulate when wet and dry. I remember Dr Murray Hamlet mentioning these statistics in one of his lectures on outdoor survival in the cold. It's been a long time, but I think cotton looses something like 80% of its insulating properties when wet. I may be off on the exact number, but I definitely ...


18

They are basically measures for the quality of the down fill. The 90/10 part refers to the mixture of down and feathers. As down contains nearly no rigid structure, one adds some amount of feathers to give the whole filling some more stability. The example of 90/10 means 90% down, 10% feathers and seems to be quite a typical mixture. I'm not sure about the ...


17

Make a big fire. This may sound silly and couterintuitive, but the reason is pretty simple. If you make a small fire you need to put your stuff pretty close to it to have any chance of drying it in a decent amount of time. And if you put clothes or boots near the fire, then you concretely risk to burn them. While if you make a bigger fire, your equipment ...


13

Some general rules: layer system also for the hands is a good idea but those gardening gloves won't work pretty well better use inner liner gloves (wool or even a softshell glove) and a warm mitten as the outer layer to avoid cooling off use hats (again use a layer-system) including a warm winter hat which covers the ears (also see this about heat loss ...


12

Having built several fires while wearing down jackets I can confirm that your jacket will not burst into flames, nylon is not that flammable. The worst you will experience is a small burn hole in the outside if an ember lands on you. Probably still a good idea to keep a safe distance away anyway there are plenty of other ways to burn yourself on a fire. Me ...


11

Its not necessarily bad as long as you are careful, also somewhat dependent on material. Generally, you want to arrange your clothes so that they are about a temperature where you could comfortably hold your hand. If your clothes are steaming keep a close eye on them and think about moving them back. Material is also an important factor synthetic ...


11

I have a high-end gore-tex jacket and my wife has Paramo. I also have Paramo trousers. They are quite different: Gore-Tex is designed to be a physical barrier that prevents water getting through, while Nikwax Analogy (the fabric in Paramo jackets) is designed to be highly water-repellent and wick water quickly from inside to out rather than being actually ...


10

So at 5C, with 60Kmh winds, that gives you a feeling of about -2C See here. Not zero, If the air temperature gets to 0C then there's a potential for about -9C. You want to be aiming for a laying system so you can adjust your core temperature with movement, if you stop you'll want something to keep you warm. I'm not sure you have anything like that in that ...


9

In the context of camping, it's perfectly safe to wear a down jacket. Keep in mind that fleece is typically also made from synthetics, and so can be expected to have similar properties to your down jacket. (Actually somewhat worse, given the texture.) A table of synthetic fiber characteristics at ...


8

From a website giving information on jackets, specifically for "Venturi" fabric, the material appears to be similar to GoreTex, etc. and recommended washing is given as: The durability of Venturi is dependent on proper care. Regular and correct care has a positive effect on the durability of the membrane. Unless otherwise stated, wash in the washing ...


7

Ticks can attach anywhere, in particular, they will find spots like the back of your knee, around waistbands, under armpits, undergarment straps or any other constricted place. Firstly, prefer to wear the clothing which is already treated for tick prevention by means of some tick repellent solution. The solution is supposed to contain Permethrin. Spray ...


7

The variety used by pipe fitters working the oil fields in the Great White North: You sound like you're working on the oil rigs, which explains why the pointer finger on your gloves keeps blowing out. Ski gloves and climbing gloves aren't going to take the abuse of turning pipe all day, what you need is a sturdy pair of leather gloves with a reinforced ...


7

There is this informal study that suggests there isn't much difference between wet gear of any fabric. http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2012/11/cotton-vs-wool-insulation.html But it misses the point entirely. It's not getting wet that kills, it's how long it takes you to get dry afterwards that kills. A much better test would be to keep the water at a ...


7

Yes and don't even think about leaving your fleece at home... Even if you are moving fast and therefore producing a lot of warmth by the exercise there is always the possibility to get into bad weather. And if not, what are you doing when you stop for a break? You are wearing wet clothing and it is cold. Maybe even windy. This will feel really cold and you ...


7

Always bring plenty of layers, so you can add/remove as necessary. When I cross country ski, I often end up very warm. Even if it's only 20°F out I may be skiing in a synthetic T-shirt. The important thing is to have the warm clothes available to put on when you stop or if the weather worsens. Should you bring a fleece jacket? 100% yes! Do you have ...


6

When you are facing a serious sweating problem, maybe your overall setup is too warm. What layers/jackets do you wear above the one-suite-fleece? I am thinking of a very thin layer which is highly breathable and will just be a shelter against the elements (wind, rain/snow) like e.g. the Gore Active Shell. Still, sweating to some degree is pretty normal. ...


6

If the suggestions in Everything's answer don't work, try these heating options: Heated gloves (I have linked to an example) Hand warmer packs to tuck into your gloves My wife has Reynaud's which leads to poor circulation in fingers and toes, so needs to use these solutions on occasion, and they are very effective.


6

To answer the question simply - no, you shouldn't spray it with anything. Waterproof fabrics (the higher end kind) are coated in the factory with a DWR (Durable Water Repellent) finish that is usually silicone based. DWR will wear out over time (and then you spray again), but straight off, it is good to go for many days of wear and use. Just wash it ...


6

Reason a) Golf is synonymous with a form of fashion, to play Golf you must be wearing the 'correct' (i.e. insanely expensive) clothing. Some Golf courses have a high required standard of dress and although not breaking the rules, non-Golf specific gear is frowned on. Other courses are more relaxed and as long as you don't wear your crampons on the green they ...


6

Personally, I keep it simple. One long sleeve shirt for daytime use, one long sleeve shirt at night. I wear one set of boxers in a week, and a pair of long underwear at night (if it's under 50f). One pair of pants I can roll up. Three pairs of socks per week. One to wear, one for bed, and one that's been rinsed out and drying on my pack. Bringing a beanie ...


5

Hold up two pieces of cloth in front of the sun, one black and one white, and see for yourself which passes more light. Dark cloth can be very thin and still block light effectively. Re-emission of energy from darker colors may be a little faster but I think other factors (see below) are much more significant. And don't kid yourself into thinking people ...


5

Not Cotton Related: Does cotton really kill? Any active base layer will suffice as long as it is not cotton. Cotton is great for keeping you cool, but terrible for wicking moisture and keeping you warm. The classic "Union Suit" that your suit is modelled after was developed as, and is still worn by some as underwear, so you could use your suit as your ...


5

Could the use of anti-perspirant give benefit in extreme cold climate where sweating can be a significant problem. TL;DR answer: Unlikely. The issue is the sheer amount of water your body will secrete during physical exercise. It would be impossible for anti persperant to prevent this amount of moisture. To clarify Anti-perspirants work by: ...


5

Your question is also addressed at http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Down-Jacket-Reviews/buying-advice High-end jackets often use lighter-weight fabrics and high-quality down. The only practical differences between them may be in features (hood? two-way zipper? water bottle pocket?) and exact fill weights. Lower-end models may use heavier, more durable ...


5

When to use it: An vapour barrier is used when the temperature is very cold and when a wet down-suit/sleeping bag, clothes or shoes can cause serious hypothermia. It's also used if you can't dry your stuff because of no sun, cold temperature or bad weather, so everything stays dry at least from the inside. Thinking behind this: When the isolation layers get ...


5

This depends on the actual type of clothing and mostly on the wind speed. The wind evaporates moisture from the body. Since evaporation is a cooling process and absorbs latent heat away from the body, the person feels colder. Skin always has moisture on it. Just like a tree transpires, the human body is constantly having water evaporated from it. Wind ...


5

It may be safe for you, but not for your jacket. While it won't instantly burst into flames, your very expensive jacket will get holes melted in it by hanging around a fire, same goes for any other nylons or non fire-resistant synthetic materials. Goose down will burn fairly well, oddly enough there are quite a few youtube videos of people burning down ...


5

At least one of everything, an extra pair of undies, and as many socks as you want. You're going out into the backcountry, not staying at a Hilton. If you're going to be out on a long trip, bring a bag and some soap to wash your clothes if they get too soiled. The last thing you want on a long trip is more weight on your back. Bringing multiple pairs of ...


4

I'm pretty sure this concept originated with search and rescue teams, who noticed a correlation between what the lost hiker was wearing, and whether the result of the search was a 'rescue' or a 'recovery'. I strongly believe this to be true, and I tried to find good data online, but no luck yet. If somebody can find a proper, double-blinded study of the ...



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