Hot answers tagged

21

One thing you can look into are long-legged thermal underwear - this wouldn't effect how you look on the outside as they go under your clothes and create an insulating layer to help keep you warm. Women can get away with this in everyday life with a nice pair of tights. So for city life, as you stated, this should mean no difference in your every day ...


18

A lot depends on the climate, on your budget, and on how much you sweat on the move. Pros and cons of merino Merino is the king if you want to prevent odour and most people find that it's the most pleasant against the skin. It wicks quite well but holds around 25% more water than synthetics and takes around 50% longer to dry. Another issue is abrasion - if ...


15

Besides being the manliest thing you could ever wear outdoors: Durability Have you ever had a flannel shirt, or pair of pants? If you have, then odds are you still have them. They are extremely abrasion resistant, and won't melt or burst into flames if a hot coal from the fire lands on them. There's a reason why lumberjacks favoured flannel shirts, and it'...


13

Drinking alcohol in a blizzard with potential for whiteout conditions is reckless, irresponsible, and possibly dangerous. Alcohol causes your blood vessels to dilate, which leads to an increased rate of heat loss. A much better source of quick energy would be a food with simple carbohydrates.


12

Caveat: Heading out into a blizzard seems an easy way to get killed. Personally I'd only do it in dire situations. Regarding your layers: Cotton stores about 27x it's weight in water. This makes it comfortable indoors or in hot weather, but it also means it will act like a swamp cooler once you're no longer throwing off enough heat to keep it warm. ...


11

Simply throwing them in the wash should suffice, but if you want to be extra sure the fungus dies, you could soak your socks in a 1 part bleach to 10 parts water mixture for ten minutes. Keep in mind that it's not your socks you need to worry about so much as your shoes, they're a little more difficult to clean. Try changing your insoles out, they make ...


10

So at 5C, with 60Kmh winds, that gives you a feeling of about -2C See here. Not zero, If the air temperature gets to 0C then there's a potential for about -9C. You want to be aiming for a laying system so you can adjust your core temperature with movement, if you stop you'll want something to keep you warm. I'm not sure you have anything like that in that ...


10

Long thick socks will help in 2 ways -- they'll reduce heat loss through your feet/lower calves and reduce draughts up your legs. Even 2 pairs of normal socks would be better than nothing. There are special thermal socks (sold as heat-holders for example) but they may not fit in your shoes. This could be regarded as in addition to thermal underwear. If it'...


10

Well, basically the difference is just that their design is mirrored. However, I have the feeling that your real question behind the actual one is "Why do they have to be mirrored?" Compared to "normal" socks, which are basically just a symmetrically knitted tube that is closed at one end and has a kink somewhere in the middle and can be worn on either left ...


9

In cold weather, I'm the guy that always has way more layers on than everyone else. I don't let myself sweat though, I just suck at retaining body heat. Sweating is the primary reason for not over-layering, but aside from hypothermia the only real danger presented from excessive sweating is dehydration. Sweating uses up fluids, and if you're not replenishing ...


9

The physicists answer: there could be such a measure (it exists for example for the insulation of buildings), but it would in the case of clothing depend on so many factors that it would be close to useless. Factors that have an influence here are things like physical activity, wind, humidity or personal disposition. To begin with the last one: There are ...


9

I also can't offer answers to all your problems but on a couple of points: 2) Coconut oil is very good at restoring moisture to your skin. It's quite 'light' in that it won't leave a greasy film on your skin and given how little you need to use it's very cheap. I've also been told that a thin layer of Vaseline on your skin will help prevent it from getting ...


9

There is a difference between just soaking up water and "wicking". Cotton is hydrophilic, which means it likes to attract and hang on to water molecules. Unlike a good wicking fabric (which relies on capillary action), cotton will not transfer that water up through your layers to the air as quickly. Here are some reasons why a wet base layer is bad: ...


8

It is normal to a certain degree that wet leather, after drying, is a bit stiffer than before. The effects will generally be worse the longer your leather was in contact with water if the water was hot/warm the faster the leather dries (so don't dry over a heater!) Normally the stiffness should go away soon if the items are worn/used: after a short ...


8

Always bring plenty of layers, so you can add/remove as necessary. When I cross country ski, I often end up very warm. Even if it's only 20°F out I may be skiing in a synthetic T-shirt. The important thing is to have the warm clothes available to put on when you stop or if the weather worsens. Should you bring a fleece jacket? 100% yes! Do you have ...


7

Yes and don't even think about leaving your fleece at home... Even if you are moving fast and therefore producing a lot of warmth by the exercise there is always the possibility to get into bad weather. And if not, what are you doing when you stop for a break? You are wearing wet clothing and it is cold. Maybe even windy. This will feel really cold and you ...


7

They're not cheap, but they exist: http://www.rei.com/product/871649/outdoor-research-stormtracker-heated-gloves http://www.outdoorresearch.com/en/stormtracker-heated-gloves.html


7

I can't answer the rest, but for here's my 2c worth for gloves. Layering : As with other clothes, layering gloves is worth doing. I'd try fairly thin liner gloves inside either mitts or a larger glove than you'd normally wear. This gives an extra layer of insulation, but also means you can just take the outer layer off when you need more dexterity than ...


7

Related (4) there you see that (3) is working. There are definitively ways to get used to a colder environment. Of course it's also a matter of faculty/predisposition but still you can train it e.g. with increasing your willpower. Check out Wim Hof who is an expert in surviving cold situations. He can stay in ice water for nearly 2 hours straight. Everybody ...


7

Hot Water - needs to be very hot - 140 F (60C) - reported to kill all, but is not good for wool. UV Light - hang out to dry in direct sunshine. Products exist that claim to sterilize shoes using UV light and can be used for socks. Chemicals - Anti fungal Laundry rinse (e.g. Canestan) is effective, Borax etc. Bleach alone does not kill fungus spores. ...


6

Your criteria: a full day with a decent chunk of inactivity, cold but not frigid, with some precipitation. Normally when active outdoors in such weather I wear softshell pants (schoeller-type fabrics, such as Arc'teryx Gamma LT or Marmot Scree pants) and a lightweight or silkweight baselayer. This provides wind and water resistance, won't make me overheat, ...


6

Another option is flannel-lined jeans. I find them more comfortable and simple than thermal underwear, and they are very warm in the winter. You also have the option of adding the thermal underwear if you are still too cold. What kind to get is a matter of personal preference, and what kind of jeans you would typically wear. Amazon lists a selection of many ...


6

Cotton doesn't wick away any moisture, it will soak and capture it. Furthermore cotton is heavy (compared to other materials), doesn't insulate, becomes wet very quickly, and stays wet for a long time.


5

You could try wearing a pair of sweats under your pants. I've done that before, and was quite warm, and comfortable. Pajamas are also an option.


5

Too many layers => Sweating Sweating => Wet clothing (and plenty of it, here) Wet Clothing + Wind => Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling => Cold Body Cold Body (and no dry layers left) => Hypothermia Hypothermia => Death I know that's all bit of a leap, but if you had a problem our running in remote country and had to wait for rescue, having all your ...


5

Here's based on my experience of bicycling in Toronto in winter (a daily 18km / one-hour each-way commute) ... Don't let your hands and feet (fingers and toes) get cold. They don't have a lot of fat and blood circulation and muscle (I guess they're mostly bone and tendon) so they need insulation. It's been decades since I last cross-country-skied but when I ...


5

Layers are useful, but I've found upper body layering more critical (and easier to alter- you don't need to take your boots off). For me, the question is how much wind will there be, and how active are you? typically for back country XC skiing, I'll wear light base layer, loose fitting wind & water resistant hiking pants. Once in camp & out of the ...


4

The accepted answer is an excellent summary, but I'd like to add my personal observations. I do most of my walking in Scotland in "dreich", cold conditions. Paramo is the only thing that keeps me dry. Having gone through a series of GoreTex/Event/Triplepoint jackets beforehand, my experience was of being drenched in my own sweat even if they kept the rain ...


4

A lot of the cooling effect of sweat comes from evaporation so it is debatable whether wicking vs non wicking is better in hot dry conditions. Having said that in very hot and low humidity environments it may be a moot point. One area where it may make a difference is if you are wearing a large pack, in this case sweat can build up under the straps and ...


4

I would add an extra insulation layer for the morning. A light down or synthetic jacket would help you warm up when you get out of bed. Don't wear cotton pants. Not only will they keep you cold if they get wet, they will never dry, and will be very uncomfortable. When it does not rain, you'd want your fleece to be wind-stopper, or have a windproof jacket ...



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