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15

Although black clothing absorbs radiation from the sun more than white clothing, this is somewhat offset by the fact that it also emits it more efficiently. Good absorbers are also good emitters. If you're standing in dark shade and the objects in your environment are cooler than the temperature of your clothing, then black clothing will theoretically cause ...


12

Black robes are worn predominantely by Bedouin tribesmen. A scientific paper has been written on this Why do Bedouins wear black robes in hot deserts? article in journal Nature. This is summarised quite neatly here. To cut a long story short: "It seems likely," the scientists wrote, "that the present inhabitants of the Sinai, the Bedouins, would have ...


10

Sleeping with the socks on your torso is the most effective method I have found, and it does not require anything you wouldn't already have. For this, you just: Take socks off Put them inside your shirt, under all layers of clothing. They must be touching your skin. Sleep Wake up in the morning with dry socks. This works with a lot of things: socks, ...


8

The liner acts as a climate control mechanism for your body through a reduction of moisture and an increase in circulation. The synthetic fiber content acts as a wick to pull the moisture away from your skin, while the mesh composition acts as a suspension system that increases airflow by maintaining separation between your skin/undershirt and the remainder ...


6

When would actually one want to wear exactly cotton socks? Hygienic reasons where washing your socks hot (95 °C) and frequently is important. I guess the most common such reason (besides being doctor/nurse/...) is having a fungal infection. In that case in addition to the proper medication you should change your socks frequently (if they get moist even ...


6

I have always been advised to be in bright/light colours during the trekking expeds in regions which are known for bad sun. Everybody knows that Black clothing absorbs more heat(radiation). The lighter you wear, the lesser heat you attract(radiation). Now there is a point rightly said above that the darker colours will emit it faster as well, but the ...


6

Down is the lightest and most compressible delivering the best warmth. Down is the undercoating of water fowl. It provides the greatest amount of dead air space of any insulation material for its weight. A down pod consists of light, fluffy filaments that grow from one quill or point. These filaments intertwine and mesh, forming air pockets which trap air. ...


5

Goretex, generally consists of three chemicals. The outer The outer (wear resistant part) is simply nylon or polyester. This is typically non-hazardous and can be disposed as any other plastic (bearing in mind the long periods of time this is likely going to take to decompose) The inner This is the "Gore-tex layer". Goretex itself is simply a ...


5

While reading the answers to this question I had to disagree at some points. For example referring to @DavidR I don't think that Softshells are generally less windproof than Hardshells. Over the last years it seems that the manufacturers are mainly producing Softshell with Gore-Tex Windstopper membrane. I wouldn't say that those jackets are really that good, ...


5

I think the answer is as simple as: If you own a mid-layer wear it to the store when you purchase the shell. If you own a shell wear it to the store when you purchase your mid-layer. If you don't own either purchase them together to ensure best fit. There are several different layering systems find what works for you and try everything on in store. If ...


5

The key to cold weather clothing is viewing it as a system. The base layer of the system wicks moisture from the body and provides a small amount of insulation. The middle layer(s) of the system provide warmth and wind protection. The outer layer provides protection from the elements. That being said, a proven system for the temperature range you're ...


4

A hat. Or a cap with a sun shield. It covers the back part of your neck and ears from harmful sun rays. Also, make sure that the cap is UV protective. A simple hat might not do the trick of blocking out the UV (It might protect you from direct sun though). One disadvantage of a hat is that it blocks your peripheral view (i.e if the hat droops on the ...


4

For water-resistant or water-proof gear, I apply a DWR (durable water repellent) finish via aerosol spray about once or twice a year to gear that absolutely needs it (rain shell, rain pants, hiking pants, boots). I try to do this as infrequently as possible, or before a winter trips where failure of the membrane would be very unpleasant or dangerous. For ...


4

One problem with hemp compared to wool is how it conducts heat when it is wet. Wet hemp conducts heat very well when wet which means your feet could get freezing cold. Wet wool is a poor heat conductor so even if wet they will not be as cold.


4

http://www.gore-tex.com.au/faq/w1/i1085252/ How should I dispose of a GORE-TEX® product in an environmentally safe way? Garments or footwear made from Gore laminates can be safely disposed of just like any other apparel product. Contrary to most other plastics, Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) – the raw material of our membrane - is not made or ...


3

Although I agree with AM_Hawk as down being both light and compressible, I'd also suggest layering your clothing. Trapping heat between layers keeps warm air near your body, even without using a specific material. The first layer is packed tight next to your body and regulates moisture / sweat: It keeps you dry. For example, a tight t-shirt. Next, a layer ...


3

You could try any of the following that come in XS: Outdoor Research "Neoplume Jacket" North Face "Super Zephyrus" Patagonia "Nano Puff" Outdoor research has a good return policy I have dealt with them before. North Face has lifetime warranties and accepts returns, conveniently at retail locations even if purchased online. Also take a good look at MEC ...


3

I assume by hat you mean mean a full-brim hat, while by cap you are referring to a baseball cap (brim in front only)? Regardeless, in all instances of hiking anywhere with intense sun, your best bet will be: a hat The wider the brim the better, to keep the sun off your neck, ears, nose and shoulders. For sunny, arid regions: consider a thin airy ...


3

All Gore-Tex products come with care instruction, these should be followed, obviously. It's important to understand how these membranes work, I feel. Many Gore-tex and similar products consist of 3 layers, the first layer (inside the jacket) is designed to protect the Gore tex fabric. The second layer is the actual Gore tex itself The other layer ...


2

I use the following video as a guide: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4N6ZuKTZ_c Basically: Prep garment: close all main zippers, open pockets, and loosen elastics. Wash sweat/dirt/oils off using a performance washing liquid, using cold or warm water. Regular detergent is okay, rinse twice. Spray garment with a DWR reproofing spray, focusing on shoulders ...


2

I carry a pair of cotton socks on every backpacking trip for one reason: To sleep in. After a day on the trail, nothing like a dry pair of comfortable cotton socks to absorb all that foot moisture and leave your feet toasty dry by morning. Helps keep your feet happy and healthy. Bonus ProTip: A cotton handkerchief wedged in other "moist" and chaffing ...


2

Another issue to think about is whether you will have a backpack or not (and how high it rides up). Anyone who's tried backpacking with a sombrero knows what I mean - the hat is constantly whacking the pack and it drives you nuts. Also consider (as mentioned above) the wind - a string through the hat that can be tightened around the chin works, as does a ...


2

I can't recommend Hempsocks, except you use them as second socks to reduce friction. They're very durable but not comfortable to wear. A good alternative to Merinowool is Bamboo, it's also very smooth and dries very quick. So in short, hemp is good to protect your socks or reduce friction because it's a very cheap and durable material, doesn't cost much - ...


2

From looking at the pictures I would say that for the "default" conditions at summer glacier/alpine tours they should be perfectly fine. In dry but slightly coldish conditions they will give you good grip and rope handling, as long as you don't have to dig through snow with them. The reason why you have got cold fingers while cycling might be on the one ...


1

and are there other textiles that can work? One option is of course polypropylene, it is hydrophobic (unlike most other materials used in clothing) and has a lower thermal conductivity than wool - this does not mean better insulation, but it is a safe bet it can perform fairly well over natural fibres and is fairly cheap. You may see these as liners to ...


1

The mesh liner is for breath-ability, also makes things more lightweight. That way, the inner layer isn't as dense, and still allows moisture, heat, etc, to breathe through the outer layers, if they are so designed.


1

Another option is a cap/visor with a bandanna. I like doing this when I expect windy conditions. Wide brimmed hats (superior in most other circumstances) will have more wind resistance and can become quite the nuisance. When you can wear neither a hat nor a cap (because you are wearing a helmet, for example,) the bandanna alone is quite effective!


1

I would just like to add a comment about your "in the summer" bullet point. A few years ago I went to the southwest to hike in Utah canyon country. I had some smartwool socks. I wore a clean pair every day in the 100+ heat. They kept my feet nice and cool and dry. One morning I wondered if they were really making a difference; so, I wore cotton socks and ...


1

Availability factor - cotton socks you can buy practically everywhere. When it comes to price, the wool socks you can buy relatively cheap in the military surplus, but it usually means buying in internet. Wool socks are good for winter, but for me they are not-an-option in summer because my feet sweat in them like mad. Wool socks are also heavier and taking ...


1

I would not advise putting wet socks anywhere near anything that's preventing you from getting cold if it would generate a risk of hypothermia through decreased insulation or increased heat conductivity. Using your body heat to dry socks is dangerous in cold conditions as you're taking heat from yourself. With this in mind, you should use an external heat ...



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