Hot answers tagged

21

One thing you can look into are long-legged thermal underwear - this wouldn't effect how you look on the outside as they go under your clothes and create an insulating layer to help keep you warm. Women can get away with this in everyday life with a nice pair of tights. So for city life, as you stated, this should mean no difference in your every day ...


15

I have a high-end gore-tex jacket and my wife has Paramo. I also have Paramo trousers. They are quite different: Gore-Tex is designed to be a physical barrier that prevents water getting through, while Nikwax Analogy (the fabric in Paramo jackets) is designed to be highly water-repellent and wick water quickly from inside to out rather than being actually ...


14

Besides being the manliest thing you could ever wear outdoors: Durability Have you ever had a flannel shirt, or pair of pants? If you have, then odds are you still have them. They are extremely abrasion resistant, and won't melt or burst into flames if a hot coal from the fire lands on them. There's a reason why lumberjacks favoured flannel shirts, and ...


12

Having built several fires while wearing down jackets I can confirm that your jacket will not burst into flames, nylon is not that flammable. The worst you will experience is a small burn hole in the outside if an ember lands on you. Probably still a good idea to keep a safe distance away anyway there are plenty of other ways to burn yourself on a fire. Me ...


11

Drinking alcohol in a blizzard with potential for whiteout conditions is reckless, irresponsible, and possibly dangerous. Alcohol causes your blood vessels to dilate, which leads to an increased rate of heat loss. A much better source of quick energy would be a food with simple carbohydrates.


10

Long thick socks will help in 2 ways -- they'll reduce heat loss through your feet/lower calves and reduce draughts up your legs. Even 2 pairs of normal socks would be better than nothing. There are special thermal socks (sold as heat-holders for example) but they may not fit in your shoes. This could be regarded as in addition to thermal underwear. If ...


10

So at 5C, with 60Kmh winds, that gives you a feeling of about -2C See here. Not zero, If the air temperature gets to 0C then there's a potential for about -9C. You want to be aiming for a laying system so you can adjust your core temperature with movement, if you stop you'll want something to keep you warm. I'm not sure you have anything like that in that ...


10

Caveat: Heading out into a blizzard seems an easy way to get killed. Personally I'd only do it in dire situations. Regarding your layers: Cotton stores about 27x it's weight in water. This makes it comfortable indoors or in hot weather, but it also means it will act like a swamp cooler once you're no longer throwing off enough heat to keep it warm. ...


9

From a website giving information on jackets, specifically for "Venturi" fabric, the material appears to be similar to GoreTex, etc. and recommended washing is given as: The durability of Venturi is dependent on proper care. Regular and correct care has a positive effect on the durability of the membrane. Unless otherwise stated, wash in the washing ...


9

In the context of camping, it's perfectly safe to wear a down jacket. Keep in mind that fleece is typically also made from synthetics, and so can be expected to have similar properties to your down jacket. (Actually somewhat worse, given the texture.) A table of synthetic fiber characteristics at ...


9

The physicists answer: there could be such a measure (it exists for example for the insulation of buildings), but it would in the case of clothing depend on so many factors that it would be close to useless. Factors that have an influence here are things like physical activity, wind, humidity or personal disposition. To begin with the last one: There are ...


9

In cold weather, I'm the guy that always has way more layers on than everyone else. I don't let myself sweat though, I just suck at retaining body heat. Sweating is the primary reason for not over-layering, but aside from hypothermia the only real danger presented from excessive sweating is dehydration. Sweating uses up fluids, and if you're not replenishing ...


8

Always bring plenty of layers, so you can add/remove as necessary. When I cross country ski, I often end up very warm. Even if it's only 20°F out I may be skiing in a synthetic T-shirt. The important thing is to have the warm clothes available to put on when you stop or if the weather worsens. Should you bring a fleece jacket? 100% yes! Do you have ...


8

It is normal to a certain degree that wet leather, after drying, is a bit stiffer than before. The effects will generally be worse the longer your leather was in contact with water if the water was hot/warm the faster the leather dries (so don't dry over a heater!) Normally the stiffness should go away soon if the items are worn/used: after a short ...


8

I also can't offer answers to all your problems but on a couple of points: 2) Coconut oil is very good at restoring moisture to your skin. It's quite 'light' in that it won't leave a greasy film on your skin and given how little you need to use it's very cheap. I've also been told that a thin layer of Vaseline on your skin will help prevent it from getting ...


7

They're not cheap, but they exist: http://www.rei.com/product/871649/outdoor-research-stormtracker-heated-gloves http://www.outdoorresearch.com/en/stormtracker-heated-gloves.html


7

Yes and don't even think about leaving your fleece at home... Even if you are moving fast and therefore producing a lot of warmth by the exercise there is always the possibility to get into bad weather. And if not, what are you doing when you stop for a break? You are wearing wet clothing and it is cold. Maybe even windy. This will feel really cold and you ...


7

Reason a) Golf is synonymous with a form of fashion, to play Golf you must be wearing the 'correct' (i.e. insanely expensive) clothing. Some Golf courses have a high required standard of dress and although not breaking the rules, non-Golf specific gear is frowned on. Other courses are more relaxed and as long as you don't wear your crampons on the green they ...


7

To answer the question simply - no, you shouldn't spray it with anything. Waterproof fabrics (the higher end kind) are coated in the factory with a DWR (Durable Water Repellent) finish that is usually silicone based. DWR will wear out over time (and then you spray again), but straight off, it is good to go for many days of wear and use. Just wash it ...


7

I can't answer the rest, but for here's my 2c worth for gloves. Layering : As with other clothes, layering gloves is worth doing. I'd try fairly thin liner gloves inside either mitts or a larger glove than you'd normally wear. This gives an extra layer of insulation, but also means you can just take the outer layer off when you need more dexterity than ...


7

Related (4) there you see that (3) is working. There are definitively ways to get used to a colder environment. Of course it's also a matter of faculty/predisposition but still you can train it e.g. with increasing your willpower. Check out Wim Hof who is an expert in surviving cold situations. He can stay in ice water for nearly 2 hours straight. Everybody ...


6

Hold up two pieces of cloth in front of the sun, one black and one white, and see for yourself which passes more light. Dark cloth can be very thin and still block light effectively. Re-emission of energy from darker colors may be a little faster but I think other factors (see below) are much more significant. And don't kid yourself into thinking people ...


6

It may be safe for you, but not for your jacket. While it won't instantly burst into flames, your very expensive jacket will get holes melted in it by hanging around a fire, same goes for any other nylons or non fire-resistant synthetic materials. Goose down will burn fairly well, oddly enough there are quite a few youtube videos of people burning down ...


6

Personally, I keep it simple. One long sleeve shirt for daytime use, one long sleeve shirt at night. I wear one set of boxers in a week, and a pair of long underwear at night (if it's under 50f). One pair of pants I can roll up. Three pairs of socks per week. One to wear, one for bed, and one that's been rinsed out and drying on my pack. Bringing a beanie ...


6

Your criteria: a full day with a decent chunk of inactivity, cold but not frigid, with some precipitation. Normally when active outdoors in such weather I wear softshell pants (schoeller-type fabrics, such as Arc'teryx Gamma LT or Marmot Scree pants) and a lightweight or silkweight baselayer. This provides wind and water resistance, won't make me overheat, ...


6

Another option is flannel-lined jeans. I find them more comfortable and simple than thermal underwear, and they are very warm in the winter. You also have the option of adding the thermal underwear if you are still too cold. What kind to get is a matter of personal preference, and what kind of jeans you would typically wear. Amazon lists a selection of many ...


5

You could try wearing a pair of sweats under your pants. I've done that before, and was quite warm, and comfortable. Pajamas are also an option.


5

Here's based on my experience of bicycling in Toronto in winter (a daily 18km / one-hour each-way commute) ... Don't let your hands and feet (fingers and toes) get cold. They don't have a lot of fat and blood circulation and muscle (I guess they're mostly bone and tendon) so they need insulation. It's been decades since I last cross-country-skied but when I ...


5

At least one of everything, an extra pair of undies, and as many socks as you want. You're going out into the backcountry, not staying at a Hilton. If you're going to be out on a long trip, bring a bag and some soap to wash your clothes if they get too soiled. The last thing you want on a long trip is more weight on your back. Bringing multiple pairs of ...


5

Too many layers => Sweating Sweating => Wet clothing (and plenty of it, here) Wet Clothing + Wind => Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling => Cold Body Cold Body (and no dry layers left) => Hypothermia Hypothermia => Death I know that's all bit of a leap, but if you had a problem our running in remote country and had to wait for rescue, having all your ...



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